Horse Hoof Abscess

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Contains 57 items.
  • Equine Hoof Care: abcess distress (hoof care) - http://216.156.6.245/hoof/0398abcess.html
    • Equine Hoof Care: abcess distress (hoof care)
    [Abstract]
  • Horse Hoof Abscess - http://horsequest.com/journal/health/hooves2.html
    [Abstract]
  • Effects of Farrier's Formula - http://www2.lifedatalabs.com/bulletinboard/_ldldiscuss/0000011c.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Rural Heritage - Village Smithy - http://www.ruralheritage.com/village_smithy/villagesmithy_view.cgi?top=74&follow...
    [Abstract]
  • STABLE - Sunday, June 25, 2000 - http://www.emdowns.com/00stable/s062500.html
    [Abstract]
  • Rural Heritage - Village Smithy - http://www.ruralheritage.com/village_smithy/villagesmithy_view.cgi?top=74&follow...
    [Abstract]
  • CRITTER ARCHIVES - http://www.critterexchange.com/critterex/CRITTERARCHIVES/decabscessdistress.html...
    [Abstract]
  • Re: Hoof Abscess, continued lameness - http://www.horseshoes.com/archive/fhbb8/1104.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Canada's Gina Smith Makes World Cup Dressage Final Debut - http://www.equijournal.com/equestrian/canada271.shtml
    [Abstract]
  • EQ Interactive -- Guidelines for Detecting Lameness, Part III - http://www.tes-laec.com/facts/tes/vets-notebook/lameness-3.html
    [Abstract]
  • Horse hoof repair of quartercracks wall separations or abscess bar cracks and disease resection! - http://www.quartercrack.com/
    [Abstract]
  • Country Road Chronicles - Articles - Messages to You from Your Horse - http://www.countryroadchronicles.com/Articles/CountryRoadRoundup/messages.html
    [Abstract]
  • What's Happenin' - http://www.sidelinesnews.com/1216/whats.html
    [Abstract]
  • Epson Salt - http://forums.thathomesite.com/forums/load/horses/msg1109383025488.html
    [Abstract]
  • Equine Hoof Problems - http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/ceps/petcolumns/equine_hoof_conditions.html
    • horse's foot in the painful area until a bruise (or abscess) is found.
    [Abstract]
  • Equine Lameness - http://web.vet.cornell.edu/CVM/Imaging/notes_equine_lameness.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Pus and Us - http://www.horseshoes.com/advice/pusandus/pusandus.htm
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  • Thrush - http://members.tripod.com/cavanaughc/id121.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Equine News and Views: March - http://www.pondside.com/aeonline/newsnvws/news2000/marnews.asp
    [Abstract]
  • Dictionary - A - http://www.horseshoes.com/glossary/a/glsra.htm
    [Abstract]
  • The Hoof Abscess - http://www.v-henning.de/eabzess.htm
    [Abstract]
  • The Horse Interactive -- Answerline March 2000: Coffin Bone Fractures - http://www.thehorse.com/0003/answerline.html
    [Abstract]
  • Equestrians Online - Reiber Withdraws from World Cup - http://www.equestriansonline.com/news/reiber.htm
    [Abstract]
  • clipclop.com - See Also - http://www.clipclop.com/info/askexperts/health/farrier_hoof_index.shtml
    [Abstract]
  • Best Horse Products of the Last Decade - http://www.flyingchanges.com/_disc2/000000bc.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Broken Bones in Horses - http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/ceps/petcolumns/eqfrac1.html
    [Abstract]
  • Re: Hoof Abscess, continued lameness - http://www.horseshoes.com/archive/fhbb8/1100.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Media Release - http://www.equestrian.ca/2000%20World%20Cup%20Results.htm
    [Abstract]
  • clipclop.com - See Also - http://www.clipclop.com/info/askexperts/health/farrier_hoof_9.shtml
    [Abstract]
  • dolympics - http://www.sidelinesnews.com/1218/dolympic.html
    [Abstract]
  • HORSE REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT EXAM 1995 - http://203.5.65.5/Horses/ADHM/HRM/EX95.html
    [Abstract]
  • Lameness Questions and answers for Ask the Veterinarian at Harris Farms-Thoroughbred Division - http://www.harrisfarms.com/askvet/quesandansla.html
    • Then this sore (abscess) burst and was like an open wound.
    [Abstract]
  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - http://www.ahsa.org/press/2000/reiber.html
    [Abstract]
  • Value of Radiographs - http://caltest.nbc.upenn.edu/LARAD/course/ctext2-4.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Wet - Dry - Hot - Cold - http://www.anvilmag.com/farrier/wtdrhtcl.htm
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  • Conners to appeal $12,000 fine after Skalato is stripped of Caulfield Guineas victory - smh.com.au - Sport - http://www.smh.com.au/news/0011/21/sport/sport3.html
    [Abstract]
  • Hoof Wraps - http://www.equinehealthcare.com/products/ecbjwp4/itm00119.htm
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  • Flying Changes - http://www.pvda.org/page8a.htm
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  • equipodiatry.com, Penetration Wounds of the Equine Foot - http://www.equipodiatry.com/penewoun.htm
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  • Infections - http://www.patentskon.com/english/infections.html
    [Abstract]
  • Farrier Science - http://www.neosoft.com/~iaep/pages/farrier/farrierscience.html
    [Abstract]
  • Canada's Gina Smith Makes World Cup Dressage Final Debut - http://www.atlanticrider.com/national71.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Treating Founder (Chronic Laminitis) Without Shoes--Guest Posts 2-18-2000 to 8-1-2000 - http://members.screenz.com/GretchenFathauer/guestposts4.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Related Founder/Laminitis Links - http://www.montana-art.com/links.htm
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  • HBOC'99: Proceedings - New Horizons in Therapeutic Shoeing and Hoof Care - http://www.agric.gov.ab.ca/livestock/horses/hbo9906.html
    [Abstract]
  • THE WARMBLOOD HORSE - HOOF CARE FORUM - http://www.warmbloods.net/VirtualServers/warmbloods/hoofcaredisc9_toc.htm
    [Abstract]
  • E3 Information about Horses - http://www.nauticom.net/www/algae/horse/
    [Abstract]
  • Michelle - http://www.redwrench.com/mischorse/michelles_horse_pages.htm
    [Abstract]
  • Footrot in sheep: 2. Diagnosis - http://www.nre.vic.gov.au/web/root/domino/infseries/infsheet.nsf/948cf8407d6ac5d...
    [Abstract]
  • Abcess Problem - Between Rounds - http://www.chronofhorse.com/ubb/Forum5/HTML/000134.html
    [Abstract]
  • Contracted heels - http://www.horse10.com/Applications/contractedheels.htm
    [Abstract]
  • The Horse Interactive -- Features, Nov. 1997: Thrush - http://www.thehorse.com/1197/thrush1197.html
    [Abstract]
  • Large Animal Radiology - Quiz 3 - http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/larad/quiz/quizc.htm
    [Abstract]
  • DairyBiz -- Animal Health -- Lameness and Hoof Health - http://www.dairybiz.com/archive/a_health_35.htm
    • he horny capsule of the claw (hoof) is comprised of the wall, sole, heel, and
    [Abstract]
  • Laminitis Simplified - Hyperion Farm, Inc. - http://www.hyperionfarm.com/laminitis_simplified.htm
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  • Sunday Times - sport - 22 November 1998 - http://www.suntimes.co.za/1998/11/22/sport/sport27.htm
    [Abstract]
  • http://lam.vet.uga.edu/LAM/LM000061.HTML
    [Abstract]

    Abstracts

    Contains 57 items.
    • Equine Hoof Care: abcess distress (hoof care) - http://216.156.6.245/hoof/0398abcess.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Equine Hoof Care abcess distress hoof care Abscess distress by Rebecca Colnar. M y first experience with hoof abscess came a few days after I bought my thoroughbred mare at the track. Did she possibly have an existing injury I wasn't told about Instead my vet said her acute lameness was a hoof abscess. Veterinarian Steve O'Grady of Virginia Equine Podiatry Center confirmed what I had learned the hard way hoof abscess is a common cause of acute lameness. Abscesses occur when foreign matter commonly called gravel gains entry into the hoof through the sole-wall junction or white line explains O'Grady. The debris will migrate in the hoof to the laminae the sensitive tissue above the horse's sole leading to an infection. Mechanical breaks or weakness in the white line can happen with improper trimming leading to hoof imbalance hoof-wall separations aggressive removal of the sole during trimming and chronic laminitis the veterinarian explains. Treat a simple subsolar abscess by opening and draining the infection. If the pain can be located but drainage cannot be established at the white line then the infection has migrated under the sole away from the white line. This will lead to a persistent non-healing wound and more susceptibility to bone infection O'Grady cautions. Instead expect your vet to make a small channel in the subsolar tissue leading to the infection. Although abscesses sound like an equine hoof problem that just happens they can be prevented insists Dr. Enhance these strong features through proper trimming the vet insists. Excessive removal of the protective horn is a common practice when too much emphasis is placed on eye appeal instead of functional strength-not a good idea. Preventive maintenance in dry weather includes a hoof dressing painted on the entire foot to contain moisture. In extremely wet weather or when the horse is being washed frequently during show season consider hoof hardeners such as Keratix. Send us a message with our comment form books breeding diseases feeding forage how to health hoof care issues legs links management The Mane Points is produced by Southern States Cooperative Inc. The intent of this site is to provide equine enthusiasts with articles advertising and commentary relating to horses. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and are offered for general information not to provide specific recommendations. Agri-Land GardenSouth Mane Points Energy Services Shop SSC Southern States Info News Search SSC Sites Index of Products Services C 1997-2000 Southern States Cooperative Inc.
      [Contents]
    • Horse Hoof Abscess - http://horsequest.com/journal/health/hooves2.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Internet Horse Resource Hoof Abscess DEFINITION An abscess is an extremely localized infection which is generally walled off within the hoof capsule. There are numerous causes for such infections however the primary causes are fungal infections puncture wounds and seedy toe. Left unattended an abscess will migrate up the hoof capsule following the path of least resistance until it eventually blows out through the hoof wall or often at the coronary band. TREATMENT Abscesses must be opened and drained from the ground surface otherwise they will migrate up the hoof capsule extending the period and the severity of the lameness. Since opening an abscess is an invasive procedure and often involves contact with sensitive tissue a veterinarian should be contracted to debride the infected area and administer appropriate medications and tetanus vaccines. Treatment varies according to the practitioner some recommending a complete paring out of the infected and surrounding area followed by application of a shoe and pad. Others myself included prefer a less invasive approach and recommend providing a small drain hole which should be left open for extended drainage and application of medication s poultices and or soaks. A compromise approach which is more expensive but returns a horse to service more quickly is to provide a small opening for drainage and medication followed by shoeing with a conventional shoe capped with a removable hospital plate. My general recommendation is to treat the area with Zenadine a tamed Iodine before packing the opening with cotton soaked in Zenadine. This procedure should be repeated until the opening is dry and healing usually about a one week period If I suspect the abscess is still active I'll apply a poultice I prefer using Animal Lintex for at least one day prior to the above treatment. BTW I ll keep adding to the opinions tirades forwarded here but I don t plan to organize or categorize them I ll simply add a new item to the top of the list. The ideal angle is a wrong-headed idea that should die Despite all the ludicrous statements that you ll find in various treatises on horseshoeing there is no generic ideal angle. Most saddle horses trotting around the countryside will fall somewhere between 52 and 58 degrees. There s no law that says all horses have to be shod There are only three valid reasons for shoeing Protection if a horse's rate of hoof wear exceeds his rate of hoof growth or if he s being asked to work on rough or variable terrain his hooves must be protected in some manner. pulling horses Gait alteration a farrier will try to change an animal's way of going for one of two reasons either to stop the horse from hitting interfering in some way or in an attempt to modify a particular gait to better meet an arbitrary standard usually related to a particular breed. The basics are essential but technology and technique are rethought daily. If he's not taking advantage of continuing education-reading books and periodicals attending clinics and seminars participating in local state regional national and international organizations-he's not educated. There's a big difference between having ten years'experience and having one year's experience repeated ten times. Establish a good working team of equine professionals trainers farriers veterinarians dentists chiropractors etc. and make sure that they can work together and that you facilitate their working together by calling upon the appropriate person for the task at hand. The end result that you desire is more specific to usage than to breed or type subsequently the farrier you select should be familiar with the discipline or activity you are engaged in. No matter how good the farrier is he'll occasionally find himself standing in a pool of blood. It doesn't matter how good you are or how experienced you are you're occasionally going to take a nail too close or a knife too deep especially when working on bad-footed or bad-mannered horses. You can look at a horse statically you can look at a limb you can look at a hoof capsule but you've got to look at the whole horse to do things properly and you've got to see that horse in motion Good horseshoers will often evaluate a horse dynamically without the owner or the casual bystander even knowing it they may watch the horses in the paddock as they drive in they may watch the horse moving down the alleyway as he's being brought to the shoeing area or they may simply be listening without looking to the cadence and rythm of the horse's footfalls as he's being brought to the shoeing area-but they're paying attention and evaluating that horse in motion. Regular maintenance at this most important time is preventative maintenance. Furthermore good farriers can recognize problems in foals recognizing angular and or flexural deformities while they're manageable. Cutting doughnuts is tough on your tires your shocks your tierods and your rearend. Although longeing has become a training tool of choice I suggest that longeing be kept to a minimum. It creates repetitive uneven weight loads on the fetlock pastern and coffin joints. Of course if you longe a horse properly working the horse in large circles using a surcingle and driving set or longing the horse free it s not a problem. This article was reprinted with the authors Danvers Child CF RJF permission.
      [Contents]
    • Effects of Farrier's Formula - http://www2.lifedatalabs.com/bulletinboard/_ldldiscuss/0000011c.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Effects of Farrier's Formula. Contents Search Post Reply Next Previous Up Effects of Farrier's Formula. E-Mail teadams@erols.com. Gravlee I would like to thank your staff for being so helpful and prompt in responding to my request for copies of studies performed on Farrier's Formula for my daughter's high school chemistry project. In October of 1997 we started him on the treatment level of Farrier's Formula and within 3 weeks his hoof wall had strengthened to the point he was able to hold steel shoes and in the past year he has only lost one shoe and nevel had another hoof abscess. I suspect that our horse was used for breeding we learned he was raced at a late age as we recently discovered his grand sire was Albatross. Currently we are feeding a combination of 5 quarts per feeding twice per day of Southern States Legend 10 10 protein pelletized feed and sweet feed along with the maintenance dose of Farrier's Formula. Will there be any complications if we add Compose to this feed combination Also do you have a listing similar to the one for Farrier's Formula that states how many applications are contained in each size container Thank you again.
      [Contents]
    • Rural Heritage - Village Smithy - http://www.ruralheritage.com/village_smithy/villagesmithy_view.cgi?top=74&follow...
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Rural Heritage Village Smithy. Ask the Blacksmith Chris Gregory is happy to answer your questions related to hoof trimming and shoeing of draft horses mules and donkeys as well as questions related to forge work in general but please do yourself and Chris a favor by reading the hoof forging information posted in the Village Smithy before asking a question that may already be answered there. Start a New Subject The following message was posted 00 07 29 at 08 36 23 Name Karla Subject re Chronic hoof abscess Message Thanks again She stopped being lame on that foot as soon as the abscess ruptured through the coronary band. re Chronic hoof abscess posted by Chris Gregory MS CJF FWCF on 00 07 11 at 22 38 29. re Chronic hoof abscess posted by Chris Gregory MS CJF FWCF on 00 07 17 at 08 02 09. re Chronic hoof abscess posted by Chris Gregory MS CJF FWCF on 00 07 27 at 19 47 53. How To Post a Related Message Enter your name subject and message Click Send to send your message to the virtual blacksmith. Please be patient the virtual blacksmith may have other irons in the fire. Name Subject Message 281 Dean Ridge Lane Gainesboro TN 38562-5039 Phone 931-268-0655 editor@ruralheritage.com.
      [Contents]
    • STABLE - Sunday, June 25, 2000 - http://www.emdowns.com/00stable/s062500.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: STABLE Sunday June 25 2000. EMERALD DOWNS. STABLE NEWS AND NOTES. CONTACT Bruno Zalubil 253 288-7723 By Jenny Webber FIFTEEN POSSIBLE FOR 40 000 INDEPENDENCE DAY HANDICAP. The next race in the series the 6 1 2 furlong Independence Day Handicap has drawn 15 quality nominations. Possible contenders nominated for the race include Blue Tejano Colors of the Wolf Country Echo Crafty Boy Crowning Meeting Find Our Star Handy N Bold Inclinator Kid Katabatic Koslanin Naab the Win Red River Valley Thetruthisoutthere Three Card Willie and You've Got Action. All effort in the Doris Harwood Barn is being pointed to Thetruthisoutthere winner of the FOX Sports Net Handicap. The Elttaes Stable-owned nominee was forced to miss the Budweiser-Emerald Handicap due to a bruised hoof. We're working towards the race said Harwood who is planning to work Thetruthisoutthere sometime next week. Owners Bill Bridges and Bill O'Connor have nominated Country Echo to the Independence Day but with only one 6-furlong work under his belt it is doubtful that he will go. The 1999 Top 3-year-old Male and Claimer of the Meeting was brought back into training late in the season and is still battling a hoof abscess that ended his 1999 campaign early. Crafty Boy who surprised bettors with his second-place finish in the Budweiser-Emerald Handicap is also being considered for the race. He came out of the race fine said trainer Bill Beamer of the big strapping gelding. MAKORS MARK TO RETURN TO STAKES COMPANY. Makors Mark has become ultra confident since winning his last three outs against allowance company and there is no better way to go into the 50 000 Seattle Slew Handicap on July 2 than on a winning note. Eleven 3-year-old colts and geldings have been nominated for the mile-long race including Astral Thunder Cantil Hamilton Island Makors Mark Mt. Ouray Rattle Bag Secret Launch Shake Loose Sou'wester Target's Away and Very Victoria. Ouray will be facing strong opposition from Pepsi-Cola Handicap winner Shake Loose in the Seattle Slew Handicap. Montana Hoofer will also skip the Seattle Slew due to recurring foot problems. Altastarr who finished third in the Auburn Stakes breezed 6 furlongs in 1 15 on Saturday for trainer Steve Bullock. Secret Launch who is coming off of an allowance victory breezed 5 panels in 1 02 3 5 for trainer Sharon Ross Sunday morning. An anonymous Thoroughbred owner has bolstered the purse for a 3 200 claiming race on Saturday July 8 to 7 500. The sponsor is a prominent owner and horseman said Emerald Downs Director of Racing Grant Holcomb. This owner is showing his support he wants to acknowledge the bottom-level equine stars. In addition to the extra purse money the owner of the winning horse will receive a trophy and a horse blanket and the trainer will receive a side of beef from Green River Valley Meats of Auburn. NOTES Kittys Link the winner of the 1998 Washington Championship breezed 4 furlongs in 49 3 5 Sunday morning for the Penney Cooper connections. Dash Eight the Sharon Ross-trained winner of the 1999 Washington Championship posted a 5-furlong breeze in 58 on Sunday. Maid in the Moon the speedy 3-year-old filly trained by Bill Tollett breezed 4 furlongs in 48 on Sunday. Amocat who ran second in the Pierce County Stakes clocked 1 12 4 5 for a 6-furlong breeze on Sunday.
      [Contents]
    • Rural Heritage - Village Smithy - http://www.ruralheritage.com/village_smithy/villagesmithy_view.cgi?top=74&follow...
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Rural Heritage Village Smithy. Ask the Blacksmith Chris Gregory is happy to answer your questions related to hoof trimming and shoeing of draft horses mules and donkeys as well as questions related to forge work in general but please do yourself and Chris a favor by reading the hoof forging information posted in the Village Smithy before asking a question that may already be answered there. Start a New Subject The following message was posted 00 07 17 at 08 02 09 Name Chris Gregory MS CJF FWCF Subject re Chronic hoof abscess Message I am glad to hear that the abscess has found a way out. re Chronic hoof abscess posted by Chris Gregory MS CJF FWCF on 00 07 11 at 22 38 29. re Chronic hoof abscess posted by Chris Gregory MS CJF FWCF on 00 07 17 at 08 02 09. re Chronic hoof abscess posted by Chris Gregory MS CJF FWCF on 00 07 27 at 19 47 53. How To Post a Related Message Enter your name subject and message Click Send to send your message to the virtual blacksmith. Please be patient the virtual blacksmith may have other irons in the fire. Name Subject Message 281 Dean Ridge Lane Gainesboro TN 38562-5039 Phone 931-268-0655 editor@ruralheritage.com.
      [Contents]
    • CRITTER ARCHIVES - http://www.critterexchange.com/critterex/CRITTERARCHIVES/decabscessdistress.html...
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: CRITTER ARCHIVES. AVOIDING ABSCESS DISTRESS by Rebecca Colnar My first experience with hoof abscess came a few days after I bought my thoroughbred mare at the track. Did she possibly have an existing injury I wasn't told about Instead my vet said her acute lameness was a hoof abscess. Veterinarian Steve O'Grady of Virginia Equine Podiatry Center confirmed what I learned the hard way hoof abscess is a common cause of acute lameness. Abscesses occur when foreign matter commonly called gravel gains entry into the hoof through the sole-wall junction or white line explains O'Grady. The debris will migrate in the hoof to the laminae the sensitive tissue above the horse's sole leading to an infection. Mechanical breaks or weakness in the white line can happen with improper trimming leading to hoof imbalance hoof wall separations aggressive removal of the sole during trimming and chronic laminitis the veterinarian explains. Treat a simple subsolar abscess by opening and draining the infection. If the pain can be located but drainage cannot be established at the white line then the infection has migrated. This will lead to a persistent non-healing wound and more susceptibility to bone infection O'Grady cautions. Instead expect your vet to make a small channel from the sole-wall junction into the subsolar tissue leading to the infection.
      [Contents]
    • Re: Hoof Abscess, continued lameness - http://www.horseshoes.com/archive/fhbb8/1104.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Re Hoof Abscess continued lameness. Re Hoof Abscess continued lameness. Follow Ups General 1 Posted by Crystal P. on February 11 1999 at 21 20 51 In Reply to Re Hoof Abscess continued lameness posted by Danvers Child on February 11 1999 at 10 44 06 My 5 year old gelding had an abscess in his left front hoof. Do you have any suggstions It has us completely puzzed Although farriers are often called upon to deal with hoof abscesses and we generally address them as an immediate concern it's really a veterinary concern since proper treatment usually involves invasive technigues and administration of drugs and or vaccines. Done properly then the treatment of hoof abscesses is a joint effort among the farrier the veterinarian and the owner primary caregiver. get him her working together with your farrier to address the problem. relatively inert material that while it may have some softening effect may in fact provide a barrier which works against the abscess venting. The increased moisture along with the dark unoxygenated environment tends. to promote and exacerbate the condition rather than remediating it. Crys Follow Ups Post a Followup Name E-Mail Subject Comments My 5 year old gelding had an abscess in his left front hoof. Do you have any suggstions It has us completely puzzed Although farriers are often called upon to deal with hoof abscesses and we generally address them as an immediate concern it's really a veterinary concern since proper treatment usually involves invasive technigues and administration of drugs and or vaccines. Done properly then the treatment of hoof abscesses is a joint effort among the farrier the veterinarian and the owner primary caregiver. My first recommendation then is that you call your veterinarian and get him her working together with your farrier to address the problem. Rather than packing the hoof with pine tar it would be more advisable to use a drawing poulticing agent such as ichthamol animal lintex or magna paste-all of which are designed to draw or pull the infection out while the pine tar is a relatively inert material that while it may have some softening effect may in fact provide a barrier which works against the abscess venting. The increased moisture along with the dark unoxygenated environment tends to promote and exacerbate the condition rather than remediating it.
      [Contents]
    • Canada's Gina Smith Makes World Cup Dressage Final Debut - http://www.equijournal.com/equestrian/canada271.shtml
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: News from the Canadian Equestrian Team Dortmund Germany March 27 2000 Canada s Gina Smith of Brockville ON finished in fourteenth position overall yesterday in the annual World Cup Dressage Final held March 23-26 in s-Hertongenbosch NED. Competing against the top dressage riders in the world Smith earned a percentage of 60.20 in the grand prix with Fledermaus a 13-year-old grey Dutch Warmblood gelding by Purioso. Smith and Fledermaus owned by Faith Berghuis then scored 63.36 in the Grand Prix Freestyle that sees riders choreograph required movements to the music of their choice. The Dutch dominated this year s Final with Coby Van Baalen and Olympic Ferro finishing in second position while Arjen Teeuwissen and Gestion Goliath T were third. representative Cheri Reiber was forced to withdraw G Tudor when it was discovered he was suffering from a hoof abscess. After the grand prix Australian representative Rosamund Ryan s hopes of completing her first World Cup Final came to an end when her horse Excellent was injured by a nail piercing the hoof. Smith a 1988 Olympic bronze medallist spent time in Germany training with her long-time coach Jo Hinnemann in preparation for the Final. Smith earned her World Cup berth and also celebrated her 42nd birthday by winning the 1999 Swarovski Canadian League Dressage Final at last November's Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto ON.
      [Contents]
    • EQ Interactive -- Guidelines for Detecting Lameness, Part III - http://www.tes-laec.com/facts/tes/vets-notebook/lameness-3.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: EQ Interactive Guidelines for Detecting Lameness Part III. Guidelines for Detecting Lameness Part III by Dr. David Ramey DVM In my first two articles I explained how a veterinarian detects lameness-both how to determine which leg is lame as well as some methods used to locate the site of the lameness. Inevitably they want to know why it happens if only so that they ll know what or who to blame or how to prevent it from happening again Unfortunately there s not always a good answer to the question Why is my horse limping Sometimes horses go lame because of an accident. For example in spite of careful efforts it can be very difficult for a farrier to drive a nail in the right spot in a hoof with a thin wall or next to impossible to see the nail down in the stall bedding that punctured the hoof and caused the abscess. On the other hand the hoof abscess that occurred because the horse was left standing in the mud or improper cleaning of the hoof that led to thrush are caused by neglect. For example nobody knows for sure why a particular horse may develop arthritis navicular syndrome or osteochondrosis to name a few conditions People come up with all sorts of good ideas why they might happen but as a point in fact they don t KNOW. Having a horse examined by a veterinarian at the first sign of lameness will prevent it from getting worse. If you have questions about lameness please submit them to the editor for the new Q section of the newsletter. Some Common Sense Rules for Preventing Lameness Make the effort to educate yourself about basic horse care through lectures video tapes books and knowledgeable horse people such as your instructor your veterinarian or your farrier. If you will be competing learn basic principles for conditioning your horse and develop a training schedule with your instructor so that your horse will be prepared for the physical stresses involved in the competition. Learn about the various injuries ailments and diseases that cause lameness so where possible you can prevent them such as not allowing your horse to gorge himself on grain which may cause a disease called founder C 1998 by Dr. He is the author of numerous books and articles on horse health including Horsefeathers Facts vs. Return to EQ Interactive Index C 1998-2001 by Traditional Equitation School.
      [Contents]
    • Horse hoof repair of quartercracks wall separations or abscess bar cracks and disease resection! - http://www.quartercrack.com/
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Horse hoof repair of quartercracks wall separations or abscess bar cracks and disease resection hoof repair quartercracks hoof wall separations hoof wall abscess hoof bar cracks hoof wall disease hoof wall resection hoof wall reconstruction. Are quartercracks hoof wall separations hoof wall abscess hoof bar cracks causing poor performance in your horse Is your horse plagued by hoof wall disease and in need of a hoof wall resection or hoof wall reconstruction Allow me Rusty Freeman to place your Horse back into the excitement with my proven Millennium Patch Application Technique This cutting edge horse hoof repair technology combined with my 22 years of experience exclusively in the Art of Hoof Repair can place your horse back into competition without missing a beat If you wish to extend me the opportunity to place your horse back into the excitement you may contact me by Phone or E-mail or toll-free at 1-877-278-7897 for horse hoof repair HORSE HOOF REPAIR MY SERVICES VIEW MY WORK RUSTY'S REVIEW EDUCATIONAL TESTIMONIALS RUSTY'S PRODUCTS YOUR MARKETPLACE LINKS WEB RINGS CONTACT RUSTY If you are interested in learning more about Click Here hoof repair quartercracks hoof wall separations hoof wall abscess hoof bar cracks hoof wall disease hoof wall resection hoof wall reconstruction. Horse hoof repair by Rusty's Equine Hoof repair Copyright 1999 Rusty Freeman and Rusty's Equine Hoof Repairs. Disclaimer This information is provided as a service to the equine community by Rusty's Equine Hoof Repairs. Neither Rusty Freeman nor the web-page maintainer of www.Quartercrack.com assume responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors or advertisers on this website. Likewise Rusty Freeman Rusty's Equine Hoof Repairs and the web-page maintainer of www.Quartercrack.com specifically disclaim any responsibility or liability for damages or injuries as a result of any construction design user application of information contained on www.Quartercrack.com or related pages. Ultimately Rusty Freeman Rusty's Equine Hoof Repairs and the web-page maintainer of www.Quartercrack.com assume no responsibility or liability for the accuracy fitness proper design safety or safe use of any information published on www.Quartercrack.com or related pages.
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    • Country Road Chronicles - Articles - Messages to You from Your Horse - http://www.countryroadchronicles.com/Articles/CountryRoadRoundup/messages.html
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        Document Excerpt: Country Road Chronicles Articles Messages to You from Your Horse. Home Articles Schedule Features Living Legend Subscribe GuestBook Rates NAHTAIM Links Dealers Ad Circle Subscribe and Win Details Here Country Road Roundup Messages to You from Your Horse by Thunder Mountain Farm Ranch They may not be the most vocal of creatures but horses have their own means of making a point. Actions like rearing and bucking convey unmistakable social messages. Just by the way your horse stands he communicates vital information about his well-being and an owner who is fluent in horse language or the language of stance can identify when all's well and when something's wrong. The key to interpreting the messages conveyed through a horse's posture is to understand the basic vocabulary he uses to describe the condition of various internal body parts. In addition to his general bearing and behavior the position of his legs tail head and neck tell the most about his health and well-being. But occasionally the messages they transmit may be confusing They characterize both normal behavior and various degrees of physical distress. Although less likely it is possible that your horse may feel the first effects of arthritis or has bruised or strained part of the leg's supporting apparatus like a tendon ligament or joint. If once he starts moving it looks as though there may be some stiffness examine the horse's hoof and leg for tender areas and suspicious swellings and then compare the one leg to the other. Observe the horse in hand and while he is ridden for signs of lameness and perform flexion tests to see if the condition is momentarily aggravated. The pain may be innocent and temporary maybe he banged his leg and is experiencing the same tingling sensation you feel when you hit your funny bone or he may have been kicked by a pasture mate. Seek immediate veterinary attention if the foreleg support doesn't even up after a few steps or in a few hours this stance places tremendous pressure on the horse's good leg. Meanwhile examine the foot for embedded objects or punctures feel for pounding pulse or local tenderness and watch the leg for swelling. What it means This stance known as pointing is the horse's way of unweighting the flexor muscles and related ligaments along the back of his leg. It is characteristic of many ailments some relatively minor others career-ending. The least worrisome is a bruised heel but pointing also indicates deep flexor tendon injury and navicular disease. Because this body position opens the shoulder joint your horse may assume it to ease the discomfort of a strained biceps muscle or a bruise to the point of his shoulder. He also may advance a forefoot so that an injured elbow doesn't bear weight. If however you've noticed your horse pointing before or he has seemed a bit off without ever actually assuming this stance it's likely that his problem is more persistent. Check to see if he's stacking bedding or dirt beneath his heels this is very common in horses with navicular disease give your veterinarian a call. Immobile Hind End Pawing Front Feet What you see Your horse is camped out in back with rump muscles bulging flanks sweating and front feet pawing the ground. This condition strikes horses fed a high-energy grain ration who have had a day or two of rest from strenuous training. It is believed to combine the effects of uncontrollable muscle contraction and reduced circulation to the muscles both contributing to pain. What to do Muscle relaxants and anti-inflammatory drugs can relieve your horse's discomfort but once underway an attack will pretty much run its course. In the vast majority of episodes the horse's muscles relax in two to six hours and medication can minimize residual inflammation and resultant downtime. What it means His body hurts and you'll need to do some exploring to determine the location of his discomfort. Since this stance stretches the back muscles and opens the space between the upward projecting spines of the vertebrae most likely your horse's back hurts. However his chest or belly may be the source of his discomfort by positioning his front legs back he places more weight on them which helps to relieve internal distress. What to do If your horse seems otherwise unconcerned he eats drinks and socializes as usual he may have suffered a simple strain or accidental bruising. But if he's trembling sweating unwilling to move or if he staggers call you veterinarian at once. Dangling Leg What you see Your horse is standing with one hip up muscles bulging and the other hip dropped and hind leg dangling underneath. What it means Suspect either a broken leg or a rupture of the peroneus tertius ligament or the tibialis anterior muscle which together passively flex the hock. What to do Carefully scrutinize your horse's limb to see if it bends in a place where it normally is straight or if a joint is at an odd angle. What it means Putting weight on the forelegs is painful to your horse and there are many possible sources of his discomfort. Any disturbance in the forelimbs or supporting apparatus can prompt him to relieve the stress by shifting his weight to the rear. What to do Check the feet for pounding pulse and try moving your horse to the side any attempt at turning will be profoundly disabling to a foundered horse. But if you cannot detect a pounding pulse or other sign of distress some hours of watchful observation will help you decide if a passing pain or a profound pathology is rooting your horse to the ground. More likely your horse is suffering from an infection in the mane or an abscess in the skin or muscles making head and neck movements painful. Abscesses in the muscles also can follow stab injuries from sticks and sharp equipment or contaminated injection needles. What to do Superficial neck infections can be soothed and treated by carefully cleaning the site and removing any embedded foreign material ticks or hair. Abscesses situated deeper in the neck are characterized by swelling localized around a pus-filled center. Beyond Stance Once you've noticed a change in your horse's normal body posture you can gain additional insight into the nature of his condition by evaluating his expression haircoat and behavior. Use it as a guide for reference whenever you are attempting to interpret the messages of your horse's stance. Is your horse's expression alarmed agitated anxious preoccupied introspective disoriented sleepy or droopy unresponsive irrational or aggressive Is his haircoat rough staring filthy discolored patchy overly long or curly abraded matted dandruffy greasy sunburned sweaty Is he rigid planted trembling pawing swaying off-center straining dribbling urine or saliva vocalizing grunting wheezing heaving Environmental Evidence As you determine how your horse became immobile and uncomfortable it may be helpful to turn your attention to his surroundings. As you do your sleuthing consider How are the other animals in your horse's proximity behaving Do they seem agitated or concerned Is your horse's bedding and or the ground around him disturbed as if he had been pawing pacing or thrashing Do you notice anything unusual about the area in which your horse has been confined If he was stabled how do the stall walls look If he was at pasture what is the condition of nearby fences Is there any equipment that may have caused him harm Do you notice any signs of hair blood manure or urine What's the condition of his feed hay and forage Are they fresh and palatable These are the many things to look for and it takes a while to become accustomed to your horse and to really know him. When you do you will be able to pick up on how he is feeling immediately and hopefully prevent any major problems from happening. Did you ever think you would become a detective If You Liked This article Why Not Subscribe and Get Them All Get a 5 Discount on Your Subscription. When Ordering From Our Web Site Country Road Chronicles A Cherokee-Creek Owned and Operated Newsmagazine Published Monthly By Van Raper Productions. Email cherokee@countryroadchronicles.com This Native American Ring Site Owned by Country Road Chronicles Next Next 5 Sites Random Site List Sites Want to join the Native American Ring Click here for info Web Pages Designed By Orphanage Services hostmaster@orphanage.com Copyright C 1999-2000 Country Road Chronicles All Rights Reserved Home Articles Schedule Features Living Legend Subscribe GuestBook Rates NAHTAIM Links Dealers Ad Circle.
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    • What's Happenin' - http://www.sidelinesnews.com/1216/whats.html
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        Document Excerpt: What's Happenin'What's Happenin'Adashi who else knows a dandy turnout when they see one Lisette Milner and Skywalker took the award for Best Presentation within reason Phelps Photo After hearing Barbara Silverman had a pretty bad spell we were delighted to learn she's feeling much better and even teaching a few lessons. While lots of folks are re-thinking their Florida departure dates because of the Selection Trials not so for Jessie and Betsy Steiner We're staying until the end of May admits Jessie but they have their reasons. Of course mom Betsy has had a pretty full schedule this winter and working on her new book on gymnastic dressage has been a priority. Jennifer's just wrapped up her first book on the history of the Olympics which is going to press and will be in your hands just in time for you guessed it Books and deadlines are real life for Tammi Hoag who apparently had to dash back to the keyboard right after her Prix St Georges ride to hit the keys for her sequel to Ashes to Ashes What a literate bunch of riders we have here. We were sorry to hear that all didn't go well at the World Cup Dressage Finals I s-Hertogenbosch Holland for Cheri Reiber She had to withdraw G Tudor after he was held overnight and re-inspected. Timing is everything we're very proud of her and everything she has accomplished. Cheri her trainer Canadian Cindy Ishoy and G Tudor returned to North America on March 31st. Want to do something nice for a little wildlife center that's literally being eaten out of mouse er house and home by three baby great horned owls These little guys have voracious appetites and are marching through about 20 freeze-dried mice a day. Our editor-at-large Ellen Rosenberg is the licensed wildlife rehabilitator with the freezer full of mice. Guardian a fabulous Swedish Warmblood that John'll be showing at PSG. They are also the official photographers for the Bad Honnef Dressage show organized by Uwe Spelen who was in town judging the Dressage Derby a few weeks ago That's a really cool show with a fairy-tale setting on an island in the middle of the Rhine river. We got a nice note from Astrid Appels saying among other things that she'd been pretty impressed by the quality of horses and riders she saw here. You are doing very well if you take developing countries like France Belgium and Italy for instance into account she says. Current Issue Past Issues Media Kit Sponsors Staff Links Message Board Home.
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    • Epson Salt - http://forums.thathomesite.com/forums/load/horses/msg1109383025488.html
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        Document Excerpt: Return to the Horses Forum Post a Follow-Up Epson Salt. Posted by Lynne hodges@hsonline.net on Sun Nov 26 00 at 9 38. We have a horse that has been getting stone bruises repeatedly which is strange now that the farrier has been working with us more often frequent visits from the vet due to another horse that foundered. Lynne A gravel'is not really a piece of gravel that is migrating up through the hoof wall to burst out at the coronary band it's merely a hoof abscess which has followed the path of least resistance and burst out at the coronary band rather than draining out through the sole. The whole purpose behind soaking a hoof in an Epsom salt solution is to hopefully soften the sole allowing the abscess to rupture ventrally so that it will drain better than if it has to go vertically to the coronary band. Another farrier suggested gluing shoes on the back because the prevouis farrier trimmed the hooves to short. We continued soaking him twice a day until we visited a booth at Quarter Horse Congress in Ohio and found CleanTrax. Your Name Your Email Address Subject of Posting Message Optional Link URL Name of the Link Return to the Horses Forum.
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    • Equine Hoof Problems - http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/ceps/petcolumns/equine_hoof_conditions.html
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        Document Excerpt: Equine Hoof Problems. FOUR DIFFERENT HOOF CONDITIONS THAT SHARE THE SAME SIGNS PET COLUMN FOR THE WEEK OF JANUARY 24 1994 Back to Pet Columns CEPS Veterinary Extension 2938 Vet. Urbana Illinois 61802. University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine What do founder a sole bruise a foot abscess and a broken coffin bone all have in common A horse with any one of these conditions can suddenly become very lame have hot feet and bounding pulses in the feet and be sore in one particular area of the foot. Tom Goetz an equine veterinarian at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine at Urbana one way to begin to figure out which condition the horse has is to decide if one or more than one foot is affected. Some of the more common ones are gastrointestinal upset such as colic or diarrhea grain overload and retained placentas. Treatment involves correcting the condition that precipitated the laminitis and treating the laminitis itself. The latter is usually accomplished with pain-killers frog support and prolonged stall rest. Recovery can be followed by taking X-rays when the condition is first noticed and comparing them to X-rays taken every three to five days for several weeks. Horses can develop these from poor foot conformation flat feet poor shoeing shoes or pads that apply excessive sole pressure or work or turnout on hard uneven ground frozen winter paddocks After localizing the pain to the foot your veterinarian may diagnose this condition by paring away the sole on the bottom of the horse's foot in the painful area until a bruise or abscess is found. After applying a topical antiseptic bandaging the site and putting the horse on pain-killers the next step is determining how the horse bruised its feet and preventing this from happening again. This may involve a beveled shoe so that the inner part of the shoe that touches the sole is ground away employing pads between the hoof and shoe to raise the sole farther away from the ground or attaching a metal plate to the bottom of the shoe. A horse with a foot abscess can be absolutely sound one day then fracture-lame the next such that the possibility of a fracture must be considered notes Dr. However horses with poor horn quality to their hoof seem to be predisposed to foot abscesses especially during muddy conditions brought about by repeated freezing and thawing of the ground in late winter. However if there is no improvement after seven to 10 days have your veterinarian recheck the foot to ensure that complications such as a secondary bone infection have not set in. X-rays are required to diagnose this condition. More severe cases may require either a cast-like material to be applied around the hoof a surgically depending on the fracture type. Recovery from a fractured coffin bone usually requires six to 12 shoe with metal walls to be bonded to the hoof or screws inserted months.
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    • Equine Lameness - http://web.vet.cornell.edu/CVM/Imaging/notes_equine_lameness.htm
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        Document Excerpt: Equine Lameness. Lame Equine Lameness Clinical Perspective Anatomy Thoracic Limb Pelvic Limb Metacarpus metatarsus Digit Quiz Yourself Clinical Perspective These notes focus on the radiographic examination of diseases of the appendicular skeleton which results in lameness. Complimentary notes that provide further description are available neck the oblique views joint disease immature skeleton ultrasound etc. One of the most common and efficient means to determine the cause of lameness is radiography. Because the majority of lesions exist at the level of or distal to the carpus and tarsus these areas often can be examined radiographically in the field. Radiography is generally considered to have high specificity for causes of equine lameness good to rule-in disease Therefore if you can recognize the radiographic signs of a particular disease in a lame horse then you often don't need to provide a long differential diagnosis maybe 1-3 This is unlike many medicine cases where several different disease may produce the same radiographic signs. The trade-off for high specificity is that there may be some false negative results. False negative results may arise from not obtaining the appropriate view the disease was not advanced such to produce radiographic signs the lesion is in the soft tissues and does not produce bone changes etc. Additional radiographs to show the variability of radiographic signs may be found in the CUCVM Media Library Thoracic Limb Shoulder arm osteoarthrosis sepsis fracture and or luxation Elbow forearm osteoarthrosis sepsis fracture luxation osteochondroma Carpus soft tissue swelling stress remodelling 3rd carpal bone CB3 sclerosis fracture chip corner slab angular limb deformities sepsis osteoarthrosis Pelvic Limb Hip Pelvis osteoarthrosis sepsis fracture luxation Stifle osteochondrosis lateral trochlea of the femur osseous cyst-like lesion medial femoral condyle sepsis trauma distal patellar changes tumoral calcinosis calcinosis circumscripta Tarsus osteochondrosis distal aspect intermediate ridge of the tibial cochlea osteochondrosis lateral or medial trochlear ridge of the talus osteochondrosis medial maleolus osteoarthrosis spavin sepsis trauma Metacarpus metatarsus Digit Metacarpus metatarsus metacarpal periostitis stress remodeling bucked shins stress fracture cortical fracture saucer fracture splint disease splint bone fracture sequestrum formation avulsion of the origin of the suspensory ligament medial condylar fractures lateral condylar fractures physitis soft tissue swelling trauma Fetlock joint effusion wind puffs villonodular synovitis supracondylar lysis osteoarthrosis osselets cortisone arthropathy osteochondrosis distal MC3 or distal MT3 sepsis chip fractures proximodorsal surface proximal phalanx medial aspect most common chip fractures medial or lateral palmar eminences proximal phalanx proximal sesamoid bone fractures apical midbody basilar abaxial sesamoiditis disuse bone atrophy The Phalanges fracture proximal phalanx fracture middle phalanx fracture distal phalanx type I type II type III type IV type V type VI osteoarthrosis pastern joint high ring bone osteoarthrosis coffin joint low ring bone angular limb deformity flexoral deformities coffin joint pastern joint hyperextension deformities pastern joint coffin joint sepsis pedal osteitis hoof abscess hoof abscess involving bone ossification.
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    • Pus and Us - http://www.horseshoes.com/advice/pusandus/pusandus.htm
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        Document Excerpt: Thomas Breningstall Let's talk about pus bags. I'm talking about abscess in the horse's hoof. We all know the names subsolar abscess gravel pus pocket puncture wounds. Some come from laminitis and bruises others come from the all-dreaded quicking or hot nailing by us. Given all the possibilities for an abscess to develop the actual cause is an invasion of anaerobic bacteria through any opening into the sensitive tissue or the blood system. And yes the opening and draining of an abscess is surgery the treatment of disease injury or deformity by manual or instrumental operation as in the removal of diseased parts or tissue by cutting Webster's New World Dictionary Second College Edition So is the trimming of hoof wall sole and frog and so is hoof repair. As a result each situation and every farrier veterinarian relationship must be developed from scratch. If the wound or the exit spot is in the frog or bulbs of the heel the drain hole should be as small as possible the hoof should be soaked in epsom salts treated with topical disinfectants bandaged and a veterinarian called in to treat the wound and the horse's systemic needs. I stopped cutting the sole out to drain the abscess through the bottom of the hoof. Sometimes the drainage spot reveals itself other times you need to probe a little with hoof testers hoof knife or a nail cleaned with alcohol. They can cause a systemic infection and because of their sometimes-elusive behavior they are misdiagnosed by even the most competent of veterinarians. Putting the horse first I'm a firm believer in trying the easiest least disruptive and kindest methods of treatment. The horse's own immune system capsulizes the pus pocket and you can sometimes see large openings between the sensitive and insensitive tissue. He is certified by the American Farriers Association and the Michigan Horseshoers Association.
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    • Thrush - http://members.tripod.com/cavanaughc/id121.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Thrush Thrush home About Us. Poisonous Plants. Equine Terminology. Ball DVM Thrush is characterized by a thick black discharge Thrush is a very common word for those of us who have been spent any amount of time around horses. But does everyone know what thrush is How do you prevent it or how do you treat it once it has set up shop within your horse's hooves Thrush is a disease of the foot that usually occurs within the frog the wedge-shaped structure on the bottom surface of the foot and its sulci the grooves next to and in the middle of the frog The disease is characterized by a very soft frog and sulci. Usually thrush does not cause lameness if the disease stays in the superficial external and non-sensitive area of the frog. Thrush also can cause enough degeneration of the frog that portions of that structure have to be removed by your veterinarian or farrier. Thrush is most commonly associated with poor management practices or conditions. The full pad is good because it will protect their feet from rocks or help absorb shock in order to prevent lameness. As a result this long-term exposure to moisture and bacteria sets up the perfect environment for thrush to thrive. I am just warning that if your horse develops thrush after wearing full pads he she might need to have the shoes reset more frequently than the usually recommended six to eight weeks. This is an excellent practice not only for preventing thrush but also in checking for any foreign objects that might have found their way into your horse's foot such as nails or rocks. If you live in an area like I do-Central New York state-it is impossible during the months of March through June to have anything short of a mudslide in your paddocks. But daily foot cleaning will help offset the otherwise muddy conditions and will go a long way in helping prevent thrush. Some examples are Kopertox or Thrush Buster. Other medications can be used such as a dilute bleach solution tincture of iodine or a 10 formalin solution. These solutions can be applied topically to the frog to help resolve the infection watch your clothes most of these products will stain them forever Wearing gloves to protect your hands is a good idea. The thrush may be long gone but the foot remains quite sensitive from the chemical irritation of the treatment-use these products as directed and don't overtreat. If you don't think you are making headway with the infection within a few days contact your veterinarian. Thrush Or Canker There is another disease of the hoof which can be confused with thrush. This disease is called canker which is why you should have your veterinarian out to check your horse if you don't get resolution of the supposed thrush infection quickly. The difference between thrush and canker is that with canker the tissue in and around the frog is not destroyed but proliferates grows excessively The cause of this disease is unknown and although secondary infections of the hoof usually occur a purely bacterial origin has not been proven. These two diseases also are treated a bit differently so early distinction between the two is important. Canker usually is treated by removing the abnormal tissue either with the horse standing or sometimes under general anesthesia if extensive debridement of the hoof tissue needs to be performed. One of the most important aspects in treating this disease is keeping the hoof in a clean and dry environment. More On Thrush What if you examine the hoof and the entire frog is unhealthy or perhaps even loose For these cases your veterinarian and or farrier needs to get involved. If you are having trouble resolving the infection or if your horse is lame please consult your veterinarian. He or she can confirm whether or not your horse has thrush and recommend further treatment if necessary.
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    • Equine News and Views: March - http://www.pondside.com/aeonline/newsnvws/news2000/marnews.asp
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        Document Excerpt: News and Views March 2000 Visit This Month's Sponsor NO SHIPPING OR HANDLING FEES FOR ALBERTA EQUINE ON-LINE VIEWERS Please Note We're changing the format of the News'section. In the past we've started with the first news story of the month and placed later ones subsequently.We are beginning the new year the right way by placing the most recent news story at the top of the list. This should make it easier for our visitors Olympic Qualifying Criteria Announced for Show Jumping. Ottawa Ontario The Jump Canada Board is pleased to announce the qualifying criteria for show jumping for the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney Australia from September 16-October 1 2000. The five Olympic Selection Trials to be held at five different venues are as follows World Cup Qualifier Spruce Meadows National in Calgary Alberta June 3 World Cup Qualifier L'International Bromont in Bromont Quebec June 25 World Cup Qualifier Classique Internationale de Blainville in Quebec July 9 Grand Prix Halton Valley Mid-Summer Classic in Milton Ontario July 23 Grand Prix Equestrian Festival in Bolton Ontario July 30 The top two riders overall in the point standings following the Selection Trials will be named to the Olympic Games team. Riders must compete in all five Selection Trials in order to be one of the two horse rider combinations to be named to the Olympic Games team based on points. Following the completion of the Selection Trials two additional horse rider combinations will be named by the Selection Committee to make up the team of four. The Canadian Show Jumping Team earned the right to compete in the Olympic Games under FEI qualifying criteria by winning a team bronze medal at the 1999 Pan American Games in Winnipeg MB. Canadian Olympic Association qualifying criteria was met when the Canadian Show Jumping Team placed fourth in the 200 000 Bank of Montreal Nations'Cup at the 1998 CSIO Spruce Meadows Masters tournament. Dortmund Germany Canada's Gina Smith of Brockville Ontario finished in fourteenth position overall yesterday in the annual World Cup Dressage Final held March 23-26 in s-Hertongenbosch Netherlands. Competing against the top dressage riders in the world Smith earned a percentage of 60.20 in the grand prix with Fledermaus a 13-year-old grey Dutch Warmblood gelding by Purioso. The Dutch dominated this year's Final with Coby Van Baalen and Olympic Ferro finishing in second position while Arjen Teeuwissen and Gestion Goliath T were third. representative Cheri Reiber was forced to withdraw G Tudor when it was discovered he was suffering from a hoof abscess. After the grand prix Australian representative Rosamund Ryan's hopes of completing her first World Cup Final came to an end when her horse Excellent was injured by a nail piercing the hoof. Smith a 1988 Olympic bronze medallist spent time in Germany training with her long-time coach Jo Hinnemann in preparation for the Final. Smith earned her World Cup berth and also celebrated her 42nd birthday by winning the 1999 Swarovski Canadian League Dressage Final at last November's Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto Ontario. 2000 World Cup Dressage Final Final Standings Grand Rider Country Horse Prix Freestyle 1. Gladstone New Jersey March 23 2000 The United States Equestrian Team USET has changed the location of its Dressage Olympic Selection Trials scheduled for the weekends of May 13-14 and May 20-21. The trials which will also serve as the State Line Tack USET Grand Prix Dressage Championship presented by Rio Suite Hotel and Casino had been scheduled to take place at the USET Olympic Training Center in Gladstone New Jersey. However they will now be held at Walter and Mary Anne McPhail's White Fences Showgrounds in Loxahatchee Florida. Recent evidence that West Nile Virus WNV has survived the winter in the Northeast and will likely persist this year has raised concerns about possible restrictions on travel to Europe for horses that have been in New Jersey. New Jersey is generally regarded as a state with strong mosquito control and there is no actual evidence that horses in New Jersey are at risk. Still USET officials feel that the possibility that Europe may not accept horses coming out of the state of New Jersey as was the case last fall would place undue hardship on the Team's dressage horses which are scheduled to go to Europe immediately after the Selection Trials. The top five finishers in the selection trials will go to Europe to compete in two selection trials between June 21 and July 23. Competitors'scores in those three trials will be used to determine which four horse-and-rider combinations will be named to the USET's Olympic dressage squad and which one will be the alternate. By holding the trials in Florida where there would be no travel restrictions on the horses following the selection trials the USET is able to adhere to its season-long plan for bringing horses to the Olympic Games in Sydney Australia in the best form for winning medals. It is incumbent upon the USET to consider our horses in every decision we make said USET Executive Director Robert C. Not affected by the move of the selection trials is the Paralympic Dressage trials to select the United States Disabled Equestrian Team for the Paralympic Games in Sydney. Since disabled riders compete on borrowed horses both at the Trials and at the Paralympic Games transportation of horses is not a factor. Therefore the USET and the United States Cerebral Palsy Athletic Association USCPAA will host those trials at the USET Olympic Training Center in Gladstone New Jersey on the weekend of May 20-21 as originally scheduled. The United States Equestrian Team is a non-profit organization that selects trains equips and finances equestrians of the highest possible standard to represent our country in major international competition including the Olympic Games and the World Championships. To accomplish this the USET seeks out and nurtures the development of talented athletes riders drivers and horses and provides the support and guidance they need to help them attain their fullest potential. For more information on the USET please call 908 234-1251 or visit USET on-line at www.uset.org Reiber Withdraws From World Cup Final. The American Horse Shows Association announced today that dressage rider Cheri Reiber has withdrawn her horse G Tudor from the World Cup Dressage Finals in s-Hertogenbosch Holland being held from March 23-26 2000. The 12 year-old bay gelding by Tudor KWPN owned by Reiber was presented to the veterinary panel on March 22 and held overnight for re-inspection. Reiber withdrew from the competition when G Tudor was found to be lame from the early development of a hoof abscess on the morning of March 23. Sherry Frank Assistant Secretary General of the AHSA spoke with Reiber over the last few days as the situation developed. Timing is everything we're very proud of her and everything she has accomplished. Reiber purchased G Tudor as a three-year-old and has trained him to grand prix level. Officials Announced for the North American Young Riders'Championships. Parker Colorado March 25 2000 The Organizing Committee for the 2000 North American Young Riders'Championships NAYRC Presented by State Line Tack recently announced the line-up of judges and technical delegates. The competition is scheduled for August 1-6 at High Prairie Farms Equestrian Center in Parker Colorado. Elizabeth McMullen CAN will serve as President of the Ground Jury and as Foreign Technical Delegate. Joan Taplin BER has been named President of the Ground Jury while the Technical Delegate is Sr. Guilherme Nogueira Jorge BRA will take charge of the eventing jumper courses. Mercedes Campadera Alatorre MEX Show Jumping The President of the Ground Jury is Sr. Juan Carlos Tafur Eisenmayer COL will be the Foreign Technical Delegate and Sr. Guilherme Nogueira Jorge BRA is the Course Designer. The NAYRC The premier equestrian competition in North America for young riders age 16-21 equestrians come from the United States Canada Mexico Puerto Rico and the Caribbean Islands to vie for the Championships. NAYRC riders compete in the three Olympic equestrian disciplines of Show Jumping Dressage and Eventing. Additionally the NAYRC is designated as an official USA Junior Olympics Equestrian Event. A Dressage Championship was added in 1981 and Show Jumping debuted in 1982. The first complete NAYRC was held in British Columbia Canada in 1982. The 1998 NAYRC was hosted by High Prairie Farms while Tempel Farms in Wadsworth Illinois was the site of the 1994-1997 and 1999 NAYRC. If you're a Young Rider Junior Rider or a younger equestrian interested in the NAYRC program we want to hear from you To keep abreast of NAYRC details please send your name address phone number e-mail address riding discipline and date of birth to the NAYRC attn Hallie McEvoy 242 Wentworth Road Bolton Valley VT 05477 or you may e-mail the information to haligator@aol.com NAYRC information is also available at www.youngriders.org on the Internet. The NAYRC website includes Zone Region and Area contact information a competition schedule High Prairie Farms Equestrian Center information and many other details pertaining to the event. Ottawa Ontario Five talented eventing riders have been chosen as recipients of the 1999 Foxwood Hill Farms Rider Development Scholarships. Hawley Bennett of Langley British Columbia BC Mathieu Boisselier of France Jennifer Dann of Bolton Ontario Tabitha Lee of Chilliwack BC and Shannon Thompson of Richmond BC will each receive a 1 000 scholarship to further their training. Bennett 22 had seven top ten finishes at both the intermediate and advanced level during the 1999 competitive season with her 10-year-old Canadian thoroughbred gelding Livingstone Bennett was also a scholarship recipient in 1998 after placing fourth individually at the North American Young Riders'Championship. Montreal-born Boisselier 22 now resides in France where he competes at the intermediate level. He and Oberon his 9-year-old Belgian Warmblood gelding are aimed at the CCI Compeigne France this May. Dann 28 competed with two horses at the preliminary and intermediate level in 1999 winning the preliminary division of the Kentucky Classic Horse Trials on her dressage score with Dig Deep a 9-year-old Canadian thoroughbred. At the age of 18 Thompson already has two North American Young Riders'Championships behind her. Thompson will be aiming her 14-year-old thoroughbred Airtyme at this year's CCI Punchestown Ireland. She also had three top-five finishes at the intermediate level with Lil Peppy Zone an 11-year-old quarter horse. The purpose of the Foxwood Hill Farms Rider Development Scholarships is to identify and support up-and-coming riders who have demonstrated the potential to someday represent Canada in international team competition and to provide them with financial assistance so that they can continue training towards their goals. The program developed in 1997 by Horse Trials Canada has been sponsored Foxwood Hill Farms since 1998. To be considered for a development scholarship applicants must be a Canadian citizen at least 16 years of age a member of both Horse Trials Canada and the Canadian Equestrian Federation and be competing at the preliminary three day event level or above.ian Team is pleased to announce the short and long lists for the 2000 World Endurance Championships to be held August 26 2000 in Compiegne France. Twelve applications were received from qualified horse rider combinations to compete in the World Endurance Championships held every second year. The Selection Committee comprised of three eastern and three western elected representatives reviewed the performance history of the twelve applicants and produced short and long lists. Six riders will represent Canada in the 2000 World Endurance Championships. Four of Canada's representatives will form a team with the three best results counting towards the team placing. The team members will be selected by the chef d'equipe and team veterinarian once the horses and riders have assembled in France. For Canadians to be eligible to compete in the 2000 World Endurance Championships both horse and rider must have completed at least four one-day 100 mile rides in their career though not necessarily in combination. Under FEI regulations all horses and riders not necessarily in combination must have completed one of the following since January 1 1999 1 a 160 km FEI Endurance one day ride 2 a 160 km national Endurance one day ride certified by the National Federation to have been equal in difficulty management and veterinary control to an FEI Endurance ride 3 a 120 km FEI Endurance one day ride or 4 a 2 day FEI Endurance ride of at least 100 km per day. Canadian Endurance Team Short List in alphabetical order Rider Hometown Horse Nancy Beacon Flesherton ON Traverston Cob Shirley Dennis Milton ON Faust Larry Handzuik Busby AB Misty Christy Janzen Spruce Grove AB Tais Carol Lidstone Nassagewaya ON Csardas Ryptide Jim Peters Simcoe ON El Alarib Canadian Endurance Team Long List in ranked order Rider Hometown Horse 7. Philip Fox Penticton BC Glory's Khalil Stanley 10. Yvette Fergus ON WW Due Me Vinton The short list appears in alphabetical order while the long list is ranked. Olds Alberta The Canadian Warmblood Horse Breeders Association CWHBA has confirmed that a European style Stallion Performance Test SPT which has been in the planning stages for two years is scheduled to run from August 8th to September 6th of this year. Senior trainer Gerd Zuther has agreed to oversee the test which will accommodate up to twenty-eight stallions. Zuther has an international reputation as a clinician and test manager having operated the November Hill 100 Day Test in Virginia for several years. An international cast of trainers judges and riders is being assembled for the event which is expected to bring together the best young horses from all across Canada. In 1999 the CWHBA mandated its Stud Book Committee to develop a Canadian stallion test based in principle on the 30 day Alternative Test proposed by Dr. After extensive consultation the Test has been redesigned to run later in the year and to allow stallions of varying ages and levels of training to participate. A further modification based on the Swedish Warmblood model will permit competition level stallions the option to be tested after participating in only the final ten days. The emphasis during the SPT is to evaluate the basic qualities of the stallions both interior temperament and trainability and exterior gaits and athletic ability Highly qualified and experienced judges from Canada and Europe will be used to evaluate the horses undersaddle and free jumping along with top test riders who will appraise the riding characteristics. Having a made in Canada'test will be another enhancement to our Canadian breeding program and will directly affect domestic and export markets for Canadian horses and horse semen as recognition for Canadian bred horses continues to improve. The CWHBA may be contacted for information at 403 201-5996 or www.canadianwarmbloods.com Reining Canada Announces Nations'Cup Team. Ottawa Ontario Reining Canada is pleased to announce that it has officially accepted an invitation to participate in the Nations'Cup to be held June 21-25 in Gladstone New Jersey. Based on international performances during the 1997 and 1998 competition seasons Reining Canada has named in order Francois Gauthier residing in Lucama North Carolina Dean Brown of Kenora Ontario Luke Gagnon residing in Tioga Texas and Patrice St. Onge residing in Scottsdale Arizona as the team to represent Canada in the Nations'Cup. In addition to Canada and the United States invitations to field a team have also been extended to Germany Great Britain and Italy. Reining will be just one of the disciplines featured during the Bayer United States Equestrian Team's Festival of Champions held at the USET Olympic Training Center in Gladstone New Jersey. Endurance Dressage Show Jumping Olympic selection trials and Combined Driving selection trials for both the Four-In-Hand World Championship and the 2000 FEI World Singles Championship will round out the equestrian competition. Ottawa Ontario Reining Canada held its annual meeting on January 22 2000 in conjunction with the Canadian Equestrian Federation Annual Convention in Halifax Nova Scotia. It was decided that beginning in 2000 all riders who wish to compete in Canada Cup qualifying events or to be eligible for Reining Canada Top Ten awards must be individual members of Reining Canada. Qualifying events for the 2000 Canada Cup will be held June 10 in Red Deer Alberta June 17 in Brandon Manitoba and July 16 in Blainville Quebec. The top seven performers from each of the three qualifying events will be invited to compete at the National Final on September 30 2000 in Red Deer Alberta. Nelson King Ontario was elected President Joe Carter Ontario First Vice-President Molly Sapergia Alberta Second Vice-President Sharon Williams British Columbia Treasurer and Marylin Braun Saskatchewan was elected Secretary. The Executive Committee then appointed Alain Pominville Quebec Jim Durling Nova Scotia Gary Yadhdjian Ontario and Wendy Robinson Manitoba as Executive Directors. The following day January 23 Reining Canada presented a Judges Seminar attended by approximately 40 people interested in learning how reining patterns are scored. The equestrian sport of Reining has been taking major steps towards becoming the first internationally approved western discipline. At the upcoming annual Federation Equestre Internationale FEI General Assembly scheduled from April 10-14 2000 in Mainz Germany it is anticipated that the FEI will announce Reining as its newest recognized equestrian discipline. Ottawa Ontario The Canadian Eventing Team has announced the athletes named to the 2000 Talent Squad based on their 1999 competition results. The Talent Squad acts as a means of identifying up-and-coming horse rider combinations who have displayed the potential to become future members of the Canadian Eventing Team. Ottawa Ontario Canadian Dressage Team member Christilot Boylen had a phenomenal showing at the CDI Vejer de la Frontera in Spain February 22-28 putting her in contention for an individual berth at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney Australia. In the Intermediare II Boylen topped a field of 25 entries riding Royan a 10-year-old bay Oldenburg gelding to a score of 67.25 for the win. She also placed seventh with Bolschoi and a score of 64.20 In the Grand Prix with 32 international entries Bolschoi an 11-year-old chestnut Hanoverian gelding by Bolero earned a score of 67.12 for seventh place while Royan was eighth with 66.88 In his first year at the grand prix level Bolschoi moved up to fifth in the Grand Prix Special with 67.63 while Royan was eighth with 66.33 in front of a five-member jury four of whom were O'level judges. Although Canada has not qualified a team for the Olympic dressage competition individual berths may still be earned based on the FEI BCM Rider Rankings. If she is successful Boylen will have both Bolschoi and Royan qualified for the Olympic Games giving her the choice between two horses. Boylen also excelled in the advanced level with Lucky Lemon a 9-year-old Hanoverian mare. With strong hopes for the future Boylen also won the FEI Young Horse test for six year olds scoring 70.52 with Gericault a Hanoverian gelding by Graf Grannus Canada's most accomplished dressage rider Boylen represented Canada in the first of six Olympic Games when in 1964 the 17-year-old received special permission to compete. She also earned individual gold medals at the 1971 1975 and 1987 Pan American Games making Boylen the first athlete in any sport to achieve three individual gold medals in Pan Am history. As the newly appointed Technical Advisor to the Canadian Dressage Team Boylen based in Germany will bring her expertise to a whole new generation of dressage riders. She will focus on bringing promising horse rider combinations to their full potential and assisting them in developing in a technical strategy. Dallas Texas Visitors to Equitana USA June 15-18 2000 in Louisville Kentucky now receive certificates in recognition of the educational presentations they attend at the show. The Educational Conference program debuting at this year's show encompasses special sessions that are typically more in-depth than the remaining demonstrations and pavilion presentations available on the trade show floor. A conference attendee will receive the Bronze Level Scholar certificates after attending three to five sessions the Silver Level Scholar certificate for attending six to nine sessions the Gold Level Scholar certificate for attending 10 to 12 sessions and the Platinum Level Scholar for attending 13 or more sessions. Visitors who wish to attend the Educational Conference can choose from a wide variety of sessions to attend. Topics will include equine care training techniques riding schooling equine behavioral psychology sports psychology for. riders panel discussions selecting buying a horse tack fitting problem horses and much much more for every level and riding style. The Educational Conference is held during all four days of Equitana USA. The Educational Conference requires a separate ticket but no pre-registration or application is required. The Educational Conference ticket gives visitors access to everything the exposition ticket includes over 600 presentations all demonstration rings all pavilions and exhibits and the Keynote Address plus additional more in-depth educational sessions in meeting rooms and intensive demonstrations in Broadbent Arena. For just 8 more per day or 20 more for the four-day pass the Educational Conference ticket gives visitors hundreds of additional educational opportunities without raising any ticket costs to those who come primarily for the exhibits and who do not want all the educational options. As an added value the 50 four-day Educational Conference pass includes a 192-page show program. An all-breeds all-disciplines exposition Equitana USA features over 800 educational presentations during the four-day show plus special events and competitions each year. For information on attending Equitana USA call the visitor hotline at 888 HORSES-1 or visit the website at www.equitanausa.com. For information on becoming a commercial exhibitor call 800 393-4913. Photos for this article were supplied by Millar Freeman a United News and Media Company and modified for use here by Pondside Web Productions. Visit This Month's Sponsor NO SHIPPING OR HANDLING FEES FOR ALBERTA EQUINE ON-LINE VIEWERS This site created and maintained by.
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    • Dictionary - A - http://www.horseshoes.com/glossary/a/glsra.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: ABSCESS A localized infection of the sensitive tissues within the hoof. Abscesses often cause lameness which usually subsides when they are drained. If not drained intentionally abscesses often rupture at the coronary band or the bulbs of the heels. ACETYLENE TORCH A blowtorch which burns a combination of compressed acetylene gas and oxygen. ACRYLIC Any of numerous thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers or copolymers of acrylic acid methacrylic acid esters of these acids or acrylonitrile used in horseshoeing to fill gaps or cracks in the hoof wall. ACUTE Coming about suddenly and severely but persisting briefly. AGE Determined by registration papers breeders certificate the eruption and ear of the teeth the feel of the ribs jaw or tail. Atomic number 13 atomic weight 26.981526 melting point 660.2 C boiling point 2 467 C specific gravity 2.69 valence 3. The London pattern anvil which began it's evolution in the 13th century has been the trademark of farriers and blacksmiths for three centuries. Modern farrier anvils often have special features and usually weigh between 50 and 150 pounds. A recreational practice in which an explosive charge is placed between two anvils and ignited launching the top anvil as much as 100 feet into the air. APPRENTICE from Latin apprendo to seize or apprehend Traditionally an individual whose primary reward for labor is the opportunity to learn a trade. The apprentice is usually bound to an established craftsman for a specified period of time and paid a modest salary. An apprentice cannot accept payment for his work directly from customers. APRON A garment worn over the front part of the legs to protect the legs from fire or piercing horseshoe nails. ATROPHY from the Greek atrophia not to nourish Shrinking or degeneration of tissues. Special blood vessels which act as bypass valves diverting blood away from the tiny capillaries which nourish the laminae. A recognition of advanced skill and knowledge awarded by the W.C.F. examination includes three essay questions to be answered fully and with color illustrations live remedial shoeing advanced shoe forging and a 30 minute oral questioning period.
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    • The Hoof Abscess - http://www.v-henning.de/eabzess.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: This is a festering inflammation of the hoof Corium caused by foreign body penetration or triggered by abnormal friction of inner hoof structure which becomes infected. Most commonly the horse becomes lame as a result of high localized tissue pulse and elevated tissue temperature. Due to the enclosed structure of hoof anatomy the developing reservoir of pus cannot discharge outwardly and becomes localized in the soft tissue within the hoof deep to the Corium. One can use a pair of hoof-pliers and apply pressure to the hoof whilst awaiting a reaction from the horse. The opened wound can then be treated with an anti-bacterial ointment such as Rivanol too prevent further spreading of infection. In addition to this Therapeutic shoe similar to a rubber boot can be fitted which is an excellent device to enhance the bathing of the wound with salt water see Malanders and to prevent it from becoming soiled. One shouldn t need to provide any further arguments to why this should be a vital piece of equipment in any self-respecting stables inventory. It is not confined deep to the Corium and is therefore not cut out it can take from Eight Months to One Year to grow to the hoof surface through the sole during which time the horse can be ridden as normal.
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    • The Horse Interactive -- Answerline March 2000: Coffin Bone Fractures - http://www.thehorse.com/0003/answerline.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: The Horse Interactive Answerline March 2000 Coffin Bone Fractures. ESSENTIAL HORSE HOME March 2000 Features Index Answerline Home THE SCOOP KNOWLEDGE BANK THI HOME March 2000 ANSWERLINE Coffin Bone Fractures My horse has been diagnosed with a fractured coffin bone. What could have caused it and what is the prognosis Fractures of the coffin bone or distal phalanx usually occur in the horse following some type of trauma often from kicking or a large force placed on the coffin bone i.e. Although coffin bone fractures are uncommon compared to other fractures that occur in the horse they occur most commonly in Standardbred racehorses Quarter Horses and Thoroughbred racehorses and also can occur in foals. Horses which sustain coffin bone fractures are moderately to severely lame but the lameness is somewhat dependent on the location of the fracture. Also the horse might be only mildly lame on the day the fracture occurred and much worse the following day after the tissue around the fracture has become swollen. To determine if your horse has a coffin bone fracture your veterinarian will need to perform diagnostic tests on your horse including applying hoof testers and possibly nerve blocks. A reaction to the hoof testers indicates pain in the hoof or coffin bone that can be the result of a hoof abscess navicular syndrome or a coffin bone fracture depending on the location of the sensitivity. The nerve blocks cause desensitization of a certain area on the horse's limb and determine where the lameness is localized in the leg i.e. However multiple films at different angles might be needed to pinpoint the location of the fracture. Sometimes the fracture is not easily seen using radiographs immediately after the fracture has occurred. In those instances nuclear scintigraphy a bone scan can be used to determine if a fracture is present. At that point radiographs can determine the exact location of the fracture in the bone and let your veterinarian know if the fracture involves the joint. Coffin bone fractures can occur in seven different types and are characterized by where in the bone they occur and if they involve the coffin joint distal interphalangeal joint Fractures of the bone that involve the coffin joint have a poorer prognosis due to the risk of the development of arthritis in that joint often called low ringbone see The Horse February 2000 page 101 Fractures not involving the coffin joint usually have a fairly good prognosis for the horse returning to soundness. Treatment of coffin bone fractures usually involves stall rest and the application of a bar shoe with either multiple quarter clips or a forged rim and a full pad. Treatment with phenylbutazone Bute can help alleviate some of the pain associated with these fractures and encourage the horse to bear weight on the affected leg. In horses with severe lameness associated with the fracture pain alleviation is imperative to prevent laminitis or breakdown in the opposite leg. Simple fractures of the coffin bone often require several months of rest to heal completely. Subsequent radiographs will be necessary to determine when the fracture is healed completely and when the horse can return to work. Fractures of the coffin bone that extend into the coffin joint are more difficult to manage and might require surgery to speed healing and or prevent career-ending arthritis of the coffin joint. Surgery also is used to decrease any defects that might have occurred in the articular cartilage of the coffin joint as a result of the fracture. Large defects in the articular cartilage predispose the horse to the development of arthritis so minimizing the defect is paramount to preventing arthritis and ensuring that the horse remains sound. Successful treatment of coffin bone fractures is dependent on a few factors one of the most important being a quick diagnosis by your veterinarian. The second factor is the availability of a farrier who can create good-quality shoes that will encourage the fracture to heal and the third is the location of the fracture which unfortunately no one can control. ACVS is a partner with her husband Mike Ball DVM in Winter Equine Medicine Surgery in Ithaca N.Y. Their practice includes primary care consultation performance horse problems and clinical pharmacology. The Scoop The Essential Horse Knowledge Bank Contact Us Subscribe Advertise 2000 The Horse.
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    • Equestrians Online - Reiber Withdraws from World Cup - http://www.equestriansonline.com/news/reiber.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Equestrians Online Reiber Withdraws from World Cup. Home Articles Classifieds Profiles Training Tips Forums Stallions Trainers Chat E-Mail Links Shows Events Bookstore Feedback Advertising Equigroup Equestrians Online Stallions Online Eq. Classifieds Site Search Search For Get Our Newsletter Enter Your E-mail REIBER WITHDRAWS FROM WORLD CUP FINAL The American Horse Shows Association announced today that dressage rider Cheri Reiber has withdrawn her horse G Tudor from the World Cup Dressage Finals in s-Hertogenbosch Holland being held from March 23-26 2000. The 12 year-old bay gelding by Tudor KWPN owned by Reiber was presented to the veterinary panel on March 22 and held overnight for re-inspection. Reiber withdrew from the competition when G Tudor was found to be lame from the early development of a hoof abscess on the morning of March 23. Sherry Frank Assistant Secretary General of the AHSA spoke with Reiber over the last few days as the situation developed. Timing is everything we re very proud of her and everything she has accomplished. Reiber purchased G Tudor as a three-year-old and has trained him to grand prix level. Equestrian News Free classified ads for horses ponies tack and all things equestrian Check it Out Featured Stallion Wallstreet Kid. Forums Breeding Dressage General Equestrian Hunter-Jumper Names Forum Veterinary Health Western Home Articles Profiles Training Tips Forums Stallions Trainers Chat E-Mail Links Shows Events Bookstore Feedback Advertising Copyright 1999 Equigroup Entertainment LLC Legal Notices Privacy Policy webmaster@equigroup.com.
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    • clipclop.com - See Also - http://www.clipclop.com/info/askexperts/health/farrier_hoof_index.shtml
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: clipclop.com Ask A Farrier. clipclop.com Ask Our Experts Top. clipclop.com Ask A Farrier. Do you have any suggestions for treating a continual thrush problem Can you please give me some information on mud fever Can you suggest what may be causing my horse's hoofs to scab and crack How can you detect an abscess on your horse Is a small case of thrush bad for a horse If so what can I do about it How do you treat white line disease How can you ensure that you don't purchase a bad footed horse Can a horse's frog bleed If you do not see an abscess come out at the coronary band does it necessarily mean the infection is gone My gelding suffered from a hoof abscess about two weeks ago. I am wondering if the abscess is still affecting her or if she could possibly have a fracture A broodmare with multiple abscesses. clipclop.com makes every effort to provide information on horse health care and treatment that is authoritative reliable and practical. It is not intended however to replace diagnosis or treatment by your veterinarian or other qualified health professionals. Readers should always directly consult qualified health care providers for specific diagnosis and treatment. User Agreement Privacy Statement Send us your Feedback Contact Us Advertising clipclop.com See Also. Visit The Mall Classifieds Clipclop Auction Have Fun Brainteasers Games Horse Laughs Horse Tales Headline News Featured Articles Columnists Reviews Read Ride Ask Our Experts The Horse Radio Show Free Newsletter.
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    • Best Horse Products of the Last Decade - http://www.flyingchanges.com/_disc2/000000bc.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Home Contents Search Post Reply Next Previous Up Best Horse Products of the Last Decade. Remote Name 209.138.216.169. As the year decade millenium draws to a close what in your opinion were the best horse products to come on the market in the last 10 years List any and all of your favorite tack training innovations shampoos pharmaceuticals skin care products etc. If you can get your answers here by 1 15 00 maybe Flying Changes will print the top 10 in an upcoming issue hint-hint As for me my top two favorites were recent discoveries The HIB Horses in Black Gortex sheet and the Davis Sports Medicine Soaking Boot. I've been a big fan and user of Gortex sheets blankets for horses as well as human products for years and when I adopted my companion mare for Wizard I bought a HIB because it was Gortex reasonably price and the only one I could find at the time. Besides the obvious benefit of being black and not showing dirt as much it is VERY generously cut with non-metal fasteners and fasterners AND velcro at the front opening. I liked it so much that despite already having 2 Gortex sheets blankets I bought a second HIB for my retired Thoroughbred. It fits him so much better in the high wither and shoulder area we both love it I got my first at Olsen's Tack Shop in Bellevue and my second one through the Dover Saddlery catalog but noted recently thatthey also have them at. While my horse has had some significant injuries I've been lucky they've been few and far between one recurring problem has been the occasional hoof abscess which I've treated for years with the requisite soaking in a tub bucket etc. of Epson salts in one soaking I decided to purchase a soaking boot and it is the most wonderful thing I've ever done. I put it on pour in the mixture tighten the strap give Wiz a flake of hay in his stall to munch and I can go about my business without having to keep him in cross ties or monitor his foot in a bucket. You do need to know your horse's hoof size measure width of underside of hoof but I bought the recommended size AND a larger size and found that while the recommended size did match his measurement I had trouble getting in on over his hoof so opted for the larger size and it's worked perfectly.
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    • Broken Bones in Horses - http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/ceps/petcolumns/eqfrac1.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Broken Bones in Horses. FRACTURE REPAIR RELIES ON QUALITY STABILIZATION TRANSPORT OF HORSE. PET COLUMN FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 30 1995 Back to Pet Columns CEPS Veterinary Extension 2938 Vet. University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine With today's modern technology many cases of broken bones in horses do not require euthanasia. However fracture repair does depend on the quality of stabilization and transportation that the horse receives before treatment. Equine veterinarians at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine at Urbana say a lot of fractures that are reparable at the time of occurrence become irreparable during transport. There are a number of reasons why poor stabilization and transport which allow movement are harmful. By keeping the horse as still as possible owners can prevent further damage to the fractured leg as well as lessen the horse's stress and anxiety from pain since it won't be walking around on a painful limb. Owners need to consider the possibility of a fracture any time a horse is not putting weight on a leg. There are other reasons why a horse will not bear weight on one particular leg such as hoof abscess or joint infection but since all of these are emergency situations owners need to call their veterinarian immediately. Let the veterinarian administer medication when he or she arrives so that the horse can be evaluated accurately. Once the veterinarian has the horse's leg stabilized and has given it pain-killers and a sedative if necessary the horse can be loaded into a horse trailer. Your veterinarian may need to sedate the animal to accomplish this using the minimum amount necessary to load the horse calmly without removing all of its pain or making it weak. Tying the horse's head loosely will help it balance better providing it with hay will help it relax during the trip. Other complications include infection at the fracture site founder in the opposite leg diarrhea and colic.
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    • Re: Hoof Abscess, continued lameness - http://www.horseshoes.com/archive/fhbb8/1100.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Re Hoof Abscess continued lameness. Re Hoof Abscess continued lameness. Follow Ups General 1 Posted by Danvers Child on February 11 1999 at 10 44 06 In Reply to Hoof Abscess continued lameness posted by Lana Clayton on February 11 1999 at 08 46 33 My 5 year old gelding had an abscess in his left front hoof. Do you have any suggstions It has us completely puzzed Although farriers are often called upon to deal with hoof abscesses and we generally address them as an immediate concern it's really a veterinary concern since proper treatment usually involves invasive technigues and administration of drugs and or vaccines. Done properly then the treatment of hoof abscesses is a joint effort among the farrier the veterinarian and the owner primary caregiver. get him her working together with your farrier to address the problem. relatively inert material that while it may have some softening effect may in fact provide a barrier which works against the abscess venting. The increased moisture along with the dark unoxygenated environment tends. to promote and exacerbate the condition rather than remediating it. 21 20 51 2 11 99 0 Post a Followup Name E-Mail Subject Comments My 5 year old gelding had an abscess in his left front hoof. Do you have any suggstions It has us completely puzzed Although farriers are often called upon to deal with hoof abscesses and we generally address them as an immediate concern it's really a veterinary concern since proper treatment usually involves invasive technigues and administration of drugs and or vaccines. Done properly then the treatment of hoof abscesses is a joint effort among the farrier the veterinarian and the owner primary caregiver. My first recommendation then is that you call your veterinarian and get him her working together with your farrier to address the problem. Rather than packing the hoof with pine tar it would be more advisable to use a drawing poulticing agent such as ichthamol animal lintex or magna paste-all of which are designed to draw or pull the infection out while the pine tar is a relatively inert material that while it may have some softening effect may in fact provide a barrier which works against the abscess venting. The increased moisture along with the dark unoxygenated environment tends to promote and exacerbate the condition rather than remediating it.
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    • Media Release - http://www.equestrian.ca/2000%20World%20Cup%20Results.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: NEWS HOME Media Release March 27 2000 Canada's Gina Smith Makes World Cup Dressage Final Debut Dortmund Germany Canada s Gina Smith of Brockville ON finished in fourteenth position overall yesterday in the annual World Cup Dressage Final held March 23-26 in s-Hertongenbosch NED. Competing against the top dressage riders in the world Smith earned a percentage of 60.20 in the grand prix with Fledermaus a 13-year-old grey Dutch Warmblood gelding by Purioso. Smith and Fledermaus owned by Faith Berghuis then scored 63.36 in the Grand Prix Freestyle that sees riders choreograph required movements to the music of their choice. The Dutch dominated this year s Final with Coby Van Baalen and Olympic Ferro finishing in second position while Arjen Teeuwissen and Gestion Goliath T were third. representative Cheri Reiber was forced to withdraw G Tudor when it was discovered he was suffering from a hoof abscess. After the grand prix Australian representative Rosamund Ryan s hopes of completing her first World Cup Final came to an end when her horse Excellent was injured by a nail piercing the hoof. Smith a 1988 Olympic bronze medallist spent time in Germany training with her long-time coach Jo Hinnemann in preparation for the Final. Smith earned her World Cup berth and also celebrated her 42nd birthday by winning the 1999 Swarovski Canadian League Dressage Final at last November's Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto ON.
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    • clipclop.com - See Also - http://www.clipclop.com/info/askexperts/health/farrier_hoof_9.shtml
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: clipclop.com Ask A Farrier. clipclop.com Ask Our Experts Top. clipclop.com Ask A Farrier. I took him back home applied a poultice and Bute however he has swelled up to his knees. Do you have any suggestions Submitted by Leslie Answer It sounds like the abscess has not fully been removed and is therefore festering. clipclop.com makes every effort to provide information on horse health care and treatment that is authoritative reliable and practical. It is not intended however to replace diagnosis or treatment by your veterinarian or other qualified health professionals. Readers should always directly consult qualified health care providers for specific diagnosis and treatment. User Agreement Privacy Statement Send us your Feedback Contact Us Advertising clipclop.com See Also. Visit The Mall Classifieds Clipclop Auction Have Fun Brainteasers Games Horse Laughs Horse Tales Headline News Featured Articles Columnists Reviews Read Ride Ask Our Experts The Horse Radio Show Free Newsletter.
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    • dolympics - http://www.sidelinesnews.com/1218/dolympic.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: 2000 Olympic Selection Trials. Guenter Seidel and Foltaire Grand Prix horses are not made in the dark especially those of Olympic caliber. Therefore there aren't usually many surprises in the Olympic selection process. Just like 1996 when Peron and Michele Gibson gained experience in Germany then arrived at the Gladstone selection and took the town by storm Carey Schopf and her mare Iktisas and Lisa Wilcox on the stallion Rohdiamant nearly did the same thing. Everyone who saw their performances in Orlando and White Fences was impressed with the light and effortless passage and piaffe the mare showed. Meanwhile Rohdiamant with Lisa Wilcox stayed in Germany to earn their qualification scores and in the end they did not qualify for the selection. But there are some welcome and familiar faces among the twelve riders who are coming to the two Selection weekends many with a surprising amount of international experience. Everest has European competition experience while Ranier is relatively new to Robert and to Grand Prix. Guenter retired his star Graf George after the World Games and is riding Foltaire who has competed in Europe and Metallic a veteran of the Atlanta Olympics. Another horse with European competition experience is Steffan Peters'gelding Grandeur. Kathleen Raine is joining Steffan and Guenter from California for the invasion from the West Coast. Christine Traurig and Etienne arrived home from training in Germany to take part in the selections. This impressive gelding was a popular winner at the Festival of Champions at Prix St. Will he be ready for the trials now Tina Konyot arrived to her Florida home after training in Germany bringing her Dutch gelding Justice ready to try for the team. Her horse is only 9 how will he stand the stress of the selection Debbie McDonald has her experienced World Cup gelding Beaurivage ready for the Selection. Another up and coming rider is Tami Crawford on the improving Dakota who made good use of their winter of training and showing in Florida. No matter what experience and averages these riders have coming into the Selection weekends their scores are wiped clean and everyone starts over. Current Issue Past Issues Media Kit Sponsors Staff Links Message Board Home.
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    • HORSE REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT EXAM 1995 - http://203.5.65.5/Horses/ADHM/HRM/EX95.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: HORSE REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT EXAM 1995. HORSE REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT EXAM 1995. Section A For each statement indicate the appropriate response by writing a b c or d in your exam answer booklet. This could lead to decreased fertility in September because a the pressure could block the vas deferens b there may have been a fever that decreased spermatogenesis c the abscess has the bacteria that causes C.E.M. The accessory sex glands produce a testosterone b interstitial cell stimulating hormone c fluid and gel for the semen d blood to produce the erection 3. If a follicle test was performed on a mare and a 2 cm follicle was found this would generally indicate a she will ovulate within 24 hrs b she has ovulated c she is pregnant d she will not ovulate within 24 hrs 4. A recto-vaginal fistula a helps a mare to remove contamination b is a cause of infertility in the mare c is a cause of infertility in the stallion d helps the foal to slide out easily 5. A Caslick operation will a stop the eyelash rubbing against the foal's eye b help a mare to foal c help ovulation d prevent windsucking 6. If a mare was showing the Flehmen reaction and mounting other mares this mare probably has a endometritis b an ovarian tumour c blocked oviducts d an unusual social upbringing 7. An endometrial biopsy may indicate if the mare is a ready to serve b likely to retain a pregnancy c needs prostaglandin d has twins 8. A foal with retained meconium will a lie down on its back b develop laminitis c shake and shiver d push its head against a post 9. It may have a Neonatal Maladjustment Syndrome b sore molars c too much meconium d a ruptured bladder 10. Twin pregnancies will generally lead the mare to a develop twice as many follicles b abort at eight to ten months c increase the thickness of her cervix d need relaxation tape therapy Section B Answer the following with brief responses. List the procedures and precautions you would take if you were dealing with a mare with foaling difficulties. A mare has just aborted and the vet thinks it might be Equine Herpes Virus type 1 equine abortovirus Describe the measures you would take. List and describe the possible uses of the following hormones on a stud i.
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    • Lameness Questions and answers for Ask the Veterinarian at Harris Farms-Thoroughbred Division - http://www.harrisfarms.com/askvet/quesandansla.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Lameness Questions and answers for Ask the Veterinarian at Harris Farms-Thoroughbred Division. Lameness Questions and Answers. BREEDING FOALS HEALTH LAMENESS NUTRITION GENERAL October 29 1999 WE HAVE A 5 YEAR OLD CUTTING HORSE THAT WE NOTICED A HARD LUMP 2 INCHES BELOW HIS HOCK EVERY ONE TELLS US IT IS A CURB IS A CURB HARD OR SOFT THERE DOES NOT SEEM TO BE ANY SWELLING OR HEAT ITS JUST HARD AND STICKS OUT SLIGHTY ON THE BACK OF HIS LEG WE DID NOT HAVE THIS HORSE CHECKED BY A VET BEFORE WE BOUGHT HIM THE PERSON HAS A GOOD REPUTATION BUT SHE HAD HIM ONLY 3 WEEKS BEFORE WE BOUGHT HIM. OUR LOCAL VET LOOKED AT HIM BUT DIDNT SAY MUCH ONLY IF IT DIDNT BOTHER HIM THAT SHE WOULD NOT DO ANYTHING AND THAT SINCE IT WAS HARD IT PROBABLY HAPPEND BEFORE WE GOT HIM WE DID NOTICE WHEN HE WAS SEPERATED FROM OUR OTHER HORSES AND HE COULD NOT SEE THEM HE WOULD RUN VERY FAST BACK AND FORTH ON THE FENCELINE UNTILL HE COULD SEE THEM AGAIN WHICH SOMTIMES WAS FOR 40 TO 60 MINUTES THEN HE WOULD FAVOR THAT HIND LEG THEN INA COUPLE OF DAYS HE SHOWS NO SIGN OF IT BOTHERING HIM WE KEEP THEM ALL IN THE SAME PASTURE NOW SINCE THEY HAVE GOTTEN USDED TO EACH OTHER IS A CURB HARD OR SOFT AND DO THEY COME ON SO QWICKLY WE HAD ONLY RIDDEN HIM OUNCE FOR ABOUT 20 MINUTES WALKING AND A FEW MINUTES LOPING THANKS FOR ANY INFORMATION YOU CAN GIVE. October 27 1999 I am hoping to buy a horse capable of eventing at novice and possibly intermediate level. Bowers Spavin is just a term that is used to denote arthritic changes in the hock joints. Many horses have such changes and the severity of the arthritis determines the level of comfort any horse can achieve. I can't comment as to whether or not you should purchase this animal that is a decision between yourself and the veterinarian examining the horse. I am wondering if his cautious standing while his wounds were healing caused his back tendons to contract He has plenty of room to get exercise but rarely trots around. Should we exercise him or rest him Should we change his diet I would greatly appreciate some suggestions. Bowers Sounds like this colt is experiencing physitis. We treated him with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medicine. Bowers I would recommend having an xray taken to determine if any bony damage occurred during the original injury. She does not drag the limb and walks with a noticeable limp and obviously has trouble bringing the leg forward especially when trotting or attempting to canter and will often hobble around on three legs when trying to go faster than a walk. One treatment I would recommend would be the use of electrostimulation on any muscles that may seem to be developing atrophy. 6 of calcifications all together I have two vets giving me two different sets of information in regards to side bone. Could you give me some unbiased information on what the future could hold for this horse doing extensive hunters Any information would be greatly appreciated Thank you Dr. Bowers The side bone is definitely indicative of abnormal weight bearing or it wouldn't have formed. This is a young animal to have such extensive side bone formation so I think I would agree with your personal veterinarian. Remember as well that a problem that is causing a difference of opinion towards you r purchase of this animal will also cause problems if you should ever decide to sell. I am looking to do dressage not Grand Prix and some jumping eventing trail riding. Club feet can affect performance in leading to an increased development of ringbone arthritis of the pastern joint and an abnormal ability of the leg to handle extreme loads as would be necessary in racing or high level jumping due to the abnormal articulation of the joints. I'm glad to have him feeling better but my question to you is where do I go from here I'm confused on whether to continue long term with hock injections adequan or condrodin sulfate gulcosamine supplements. Bowers I would recommend using the oral glucosamine products on a daily basis. Hock injections and Adequan can be used when the horse exhibits signs of discomfort. Vet 1 diagnosed arthritis gave a Legend shot and proscribed supplements. At the walk no lameness shows an improvement but trotting is a burden and the canter is extremely difficult. Since July he has received daily 20 000 mgs glucosamine sulfate a full dose of Corta-Flex and aspirin. The vet says to ride him at a walk for a while but will this help him He has never been this stiff prior to July and I don't understand why his condition is deteriorating so rapidly. Bowers I would have the hocks blocked and determine if this is where the lameness is originating. I have had arthritic hocks cause tremendous problems for a horse so don't jump to another problem until the hocks are ruled out. If they do respond to intraarticular blocking then have them injected with steroids or a combination of hyaluronic acid and steroids. Bowers This definitely can be arthritis causing the periods of lameness. Cosequin Additional considerations are the use of injectable products like Adequan or Legend. I am curious that if this injury has been in existence since this horse was a foal could some of the problem be mechanical due to an uneven front end You may consider having the shoulder joint blocked to determine if the gait improves. The horse will still benefit from supplements to aid in arthritis even if the problem is mechanical because I'm sure he would have developed arthritis from the abnormal weight bearing. If the gait improves with the shoulder joint blocked then he may benefit from the use of intraarticular therapy hyaluronic acid and or steroids Good luck. Bowers It seems very likely that he injured himself in the trailer however if the veterinarian noticed some arthritic changes in the hock with the x-rays he may benefit from the intraarticuar treatment. Very positive reaction at a flexion test and numerous X-rays show nothing that could be causing it. She has had regular Adequan Legend and oral joint lubricant supplements. Bowers As to the lameness I am assuming that you have used a nerve block to localize the problem to the carpus. If the lameness truly is coming from that area and radiographs have failed to demonstrate a problem you should consider nuclear scintigraphy to help localize the problem. Temperament changes can occur with the hormonal change of pregnancy. Discuss with your veterinarian about the use of isoxsuprine or pentoxyfylline for this condition. The lower joints of the hock need to fuse before the animal becomes completely comfortable and this may take a number of hock injections and steady work before the process is complete. April 30 1999 I have a six year old connemara thbred gelding who began eventing last season at Beginner Novice and then Novice level. Bowers If an animal is predisposed to developing arthritis in a joint due to conformational problems you can't prevent the process. You can use products like oral glucosamines and chondroitin sulfates as well as injectable preparations to help slow down the progression of the arthritic changes as well as making the animal more comfortable. To be more specific I mentioned that this mare literally sleeps upright and to clarify she doesn't seem to have the locking mechanism that allows her to do so without falling forward. I thought this might be a shoulder problem for years she has been favoring 1 leg it is obvious in hoof comparison. Have you seen this kind of lameness With the little information I could retrieve from her past I was told that there was a shoulder problem and an eventual inability to get up over rails. She likewise cannot wear nail-on shoes because of nasty coronary hoof abscesses. Bowers I can't really say what your mare is doing but with the history of chronic hoof abscesses I am curious whether or not she has laminitis. It would be interesting as well to try this mare on some acepromazine therapy to see if she relaxes enough to actually lay down and rest. Any previous injury that affects the stay apparatus of the horse located in the hind legs would affect their ability to rest standing up. There are two types of lesions in the hock joint one is thought to be an OCD lesion the other is felt to be more traumatic in nature and the histological changes are not felt to be consistent with OCD. True OCD lesions are hereditary as they are due to a defect in the subchondral bone. The other type of lesion is thought to reflect cartilage damage due to a change in nutritional status e.g. a sick foal confined for a prolonged period that may not be well suddenly starts feeling better and undergoes a sudden growth spurt. He seems to bring his limb when drawing forward out as he is trying to overt friction possibly in the hip. Would you be interested in seeing footage of this in motion or have you ever heard of this type of rotation explained. Although radiography of the hip requires general anesthesia if there is significant damage you may get a better idea as to whether this lameness can be resolved. March 14 1999 I HAVE A 3 YEAR OLD APP.GELDING THAT WAS A RESCUE BY ME FROM STARVATION AT THE AGE OF 18MONTHS HE COST 50.00 BUT THAT IS NOT SIGNIFICANT. ANYWAY HE RECENTLY HAS INJURED HIS RIGHT FRONT LOWER LEG. HE IS BY ALL TERMS 3 LEGGED AT THIS TIME. MY VET HAS X-RAYED AND THERE AR NO BROKEN BONES. WE ARE INCLINED TO BELIEVE THAT HE IS SUFFERING FROM AN INFECTION IN HIS TENDON SHEATH. I AM GIVING HIM ANTIBIOTICS 10 TABLETS TWICE A DAY AND ALSO BUTE. ANYWAY MY VET HASN'T GIVEN ME MUCH HOPE THAT THE HORSE WILL RECOVER. I AM IN NO WAY A WEALTHY PERSON BUT I DON'T WANT TO THROW IN THE TOWEL ON THIS GUY WITHOUT A REASONABLE AMOUNT OF TIME. HE EATS AND DRINKS AND ALL BODY FUNCTIONS SEEM NORMAL AT THE TIME. I GUESS I WOULD LIKE YOUR OPINION ON THIS TYPE OF INFECTION. I DON'T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THE ANATOMY OF THE TENDON BUT I AM IN NO WAY UNEDUCATED WHEN IT COMES TO HORSES I HAVE SEVERAL OTHERS. I DON'T WANT THE LITTLE GUY TO SUFFER IF THERE IS NO HOPE. Bowers Infections in the tendon sheath the structure that holds the tendons in place are extremely serious. The best treatment is to have the sheath surgically debrided and flushed to removed necrotic tissue and place the animal on intravenous antibiotics and antiinflammatories. You might contact a veterinary school and see if you could get these procedures performed at a more affordable rate. He is at my trainers now after light long trotting for a maximum of 20 minutes with daily turnouts for all day he has been fine for about 9 days now he pulls up lame. If this animal is contracted it may benefit from an inferior check desmotomy although if the condition has been going on for years the prognosis may not be that good for a performance animal. Another important consideration is to be sure that the lameness is indeed related to the fetlock area. It is possible that you have a problem in another area and the subluxating is in response to another problem. March 4 1999 Have you had any experience with horses that have had an Annular Ligament Desmotomy I am interested in long-term results in horses who have had this procedure. My vet thoroughly evaluated her situation and recommended the Desmotomy. So I bought her for 400 my friends made nothing on it but could not afford a vet check but I bought her on a guarantee that my friends would buy her back if there was anything wrong with her. Here is my question Should I be concerned about the mushy tendons which I could not find-they seemed normal to me and the scar with the scar tissue that has enlarged the ankle somewhat affecting her soundness I would really appreciate it if you could find the time to respond. Bowers It is impossible to know if this mare has a problem that would prevent her from being a riding horse without actually examining her. I realize that it is expensive to have a veterinarian examine a horse but they are expensive animals to keep so unless you would be satisfied if all she could be was a pet I would try to get a minimum examination done. March 4 1999 I have a 5yr old PasoFino that is showing signs of stifle problems like dropping down in the rear during gaiting gaits are becoming rougher acts disjointed when being slowed down from her gaits. ultrasound examination I have done a lot of work on Peruvian Pasos and they are very prone to suspensory ligament problems I don't know if this condition is as prevalent in the Paso Fino but I would certainly consider it. March 4 1999 What is your opinion of using supplements such as FlexFree Grand Flex other products that claim to help w joint inflammation production of synovial fluid etc. We recently had him injected which seems to be helping but do you feel that these products that I mentioned can help too Dr. Bowers Studies are currently under way to address this very issue as to how much benefit oral supplementation really provides. I am a fan of oral glucosamine when combined with other treatments and I have had cases that seem to function fine when on an oral supplement but have problems when taken off. You are doing some of the recommended treatments but you didn't mention whether you had shod the horse with shoes to ease breakover typically half rounds with or without rolling the toe DMSO is applied externally wear gloves and does help with the local inflammation. You may discuss with your veterinarian about having steroids injected. Bowers The best treatment that I have found for any extensive defects involving soft. Discuss this possibility with your veterinarian and if he she is unwilling to place a cast on the foot consider seeking another opinion. There is a possibility that something else is bothering this animal and other therapies might be beneficial e.g. The body contains several examples are the bicipital bursa in the shoulder or the navicular bursa in the foot. Trying to avoid additional trauma is also important although this can be difficult in horses that like to kick. With uneventful healing the thickening that remains is usually cosmetic and will not affect the animals performance. old Thoroughbred that I recently had checked by a vet and he said that my horse has chronic inflammation to the stifle ligaments and I was told to give him a month of light work and to blister the stifle from the outside. old horse with a stifle problem would most likely involve some arthritic changes which could be performance limiting. Chronic inflammation of the patellar ligaments would have to be brought about by some conformational abnormality is he very straight behind and I would have to assume that you are involved in some very hind end demanding work like jumping or high level dressage. Bowers Lameness'that improve with the animal warming-up are a hallmark of arthritic conditions. phenylbutazone flunixin meglumine meclofenamic acid or ketoprofen intra-articular or injectable antiinflammatories steroids hyaluronic acid or polyglycosaminoglycans and a group of compounds termed nutraceuticals nutritional substances that may have therapeutic benefits One nutraceutical is Methylsulfonomethane MSM This substance has anecdotally been shown to benefit animals with inflammatory conditions. It has no known harmful effects and I have seen benefits in some chronic arthritic cases. 2 5 99 I have a 6 year old reg.quarter horse gelding with bone spavin involving arthritis. Is he ready for some very light straight riding with no turns off fences Would that strengthen the muscles I would appreciate any information you would be able to provide to me. Also if a horse has been foundered last year in the summer how does one make certain they do not founder again when put out into pasture Is pasture the definite result of founder or could there be other contributing factors The horse was put onto pasture a little at a time in the spring and left for longer periods of time when the grass was more plentiful. Your veterinarian will then prescribe the appropriate therapy usually involving the use of intra-articular steroids hyaluronic acid. Additionally corrective shoeing may be in order and your horse may benefit from a course of non steroidal antiinflammatories. The exact mechanism is unknown but may be associated with the high carbohydrate content of lush pasture or hormonal factors legumes have high estrogen content. His medical history is a bit sketchy but in general he has been a successful hunter jumper showing all around the country from age 4-12. Bowers Isoxsuprine is a peripheral vasodilator and was originally thought to help navicular syndrome because it was felt that navicular disease was due to some sort of ischemic lack of blood flow event. It does increase blood flow to the foot and in addition it increases elasticity of red blood cells and decreases viscosity of plasma. This in itself may be the sole beneficial reason for its working by just increasing oxygenation and providing components in the plasma that may remove harmful byproducts of the disease. It is possible that you will find that you only need to have periods of treatment interspersed with periods without giving the drug. old Irish thoroughbred gelding 17 hands that I purchased in December. Apparently it was only the skin deep But now he has a bump on that joint that has been x-rayed and ultrasounded in the prepurchase that is scar-tissue. Here's my question when standing still he is constantly resting a hind left particularly that back left and constantly shifting his weight from one leg to the other. Also when I'm lunging him he appears somewhat stiff behind and has trouble reaching up underneath himself very short-strided particularly with that back left leg. Bowers The only definitive way to determine if that hind stifle is bothering your horse would be to have your veterinarian perform an intraarticular nerve block and see if you notice a difference in the animals gait. Other considerations are the animal's response to working with non steroidal antiinflammatories on board i.e. does he exhibit this behavior when given phenylbutazone Scar tissue can take quite a long time to break down and it is conceivable that there is a degree of discomfort involved in breaking down the scar tissue from the injury. Despite diuretics bute magnapaste cold hosing wrapping hand walking his hock is still swollen. Additional treatments that can be utilized are therapeutic ultrasonography which can help break down scar tissue and remove fluid. Also you may want to have the area diagnostically ultrasounded to see if the swelling is just edematous tissue or there is a pocket some where. I am assuming that cellulitis was ruled out if not make sure that your horse doesn't require a course of antibiotic therapy. She could sometimes unlock it herself but sometimes required having pressure put on it. But is this a painful injury What causes this I will be getting more information of the next few days but I really appreciate any information you can give me about this Dr. The patella kneecap is a bone that glides over the top of the femur when the leg is in motion or locks at the top of the femur when the horse is resting standing up. The patella is unlocked when the horse contracts the quadriceps femoris muscles leading to the patella being lifted clear of the trochlear ridge. Anything that damages any of the components to this process can lead to upward fixation that the horse is unable to correct. This condition is thought to be brought about by a combination of factors 1 conformation of the hind limb i.e. too straight increases likelihood 2 loss of condition which leads to the loss of the retropatellar fat pad aids in the gliding motion and 3 poor coordination between the flexor and extensor muscles of the stifle. In young animals treatment is best aimed at increased conditioning with trotting and hill work. If they fail to respond the next step would be injecting of counterirritants into the medial patellar ligament to assist in keeping the patella from freely moving. upward and in extreme cases cutting the medial patellar ligament to prevent the patella from fixing at all. This condition is painful to the horse and in young animals they usually require constant non-steroidal antiinflammatories while they are gaining strength. The prognosis is good for young animals that respond to treatment. I would recommend having a set of radiographs taken of your mare's stifle to determine the degree of bony damage that is present this will determine if anything further can be done to help your mare. Bowers Lameness'that improve with the animal warming-up are a hallmark of arthritic conditions. phenylbutazone flunixin meglumine meclofenamic acid or ketoprofen intra-articular or injectable antiinflammatories steroids hyaluronic acid or polyglycosaminoglycans and a group of compounds termed nutraceuticals nutritional substances that may have therapeutic benefits One nutraceutical is Methylsulfonomethane MSM This substance has anecdotally been shown to benefit animals with inflammatory conditions. It has no known harmful effects and I have seen benefits in some chronic arthritic cases. Ideally a horse is kept in a stall with variable amounts of hand walking for 3-4 months with ultrasound evaluation determining when the animal is ready to be turned out or continued on with further therapy. Bowers I would recommend having a radiographic evaluation performed on your horse to determine the degree of arthritic changes if any that may be present. Oral glucosamine products eg Cosequin may be helpful on a continuous feeding basis. Another beneficial exercise in recovery from carpal injuries is passive flexion and extension to keep the joint mobile. Some practitioners use periligament injections of hyalurinic acid and or steroids to quiet down inflammation coupled with the time off. These lesions are best handled as you would a tendon with a couple of months of hand walking followed by a couple months of jogging etc. Horses have successfully returned to racing following such injuries. 12 18 98 We have a possible stifle joint problem x-rays sent to Texas A M injections given painting of area both sides hips ankles hocks treatment since may 98 this horse is still limping there is improvement but I'm so concerned as are the vets hoping another opinion will help us. Chronic lameness is best diagnosed with actually examination of the patient. Remember there are many other diagnostic tools available aside from just x-rays namely ultrasonography nuclear scintigraphy and thermography. 11 28 98 We have a possible stifle joint problem x-rays sent to Texas A M injections given painting of area both sides hips ankles hocks treatment since may 98 this horse is still limping there is improvement but I'm so concerned as are the vets hoping another opinion will help us. Chronic lameness is best diagnosed with actually examination of the patient. Remember there are many other diagnostic tools available aside from just x-rays namely ultrasonography nuclear scintigraphy and thermography. I would recommend contacting the closest veterinary school for a list of surgeons who would be competent in this procedure. Bowers The location of the chip will determine if surgery will be necessary. Bowers When your veterinarian said that he injected acid and steroids what he injected was Hyaluronic acid same thing as Sodium Hyaluronate along with some form of steroid commonly betamethasone or methylprednisone. old Thoroughbred is having problems with upward fixation of the patella. My vet injected an iodine oil solution into both stifles and we have him on a light exercise program lots of walking trotting. Bowers It sounds like your horse will probably have to have a desmotomy of the medial patellar ligament in order to avoid fixing the patella but I don't think that the overall prognosis for performance is that good with such a severe problem especially since the condition developed after an injury. In upward fixation the patella becomes stuck on the medial trochlear ridge of the femur between the middle and medial patellar ligaments. Unfortunately studies have shown that horses having this surgery appear to have a higher incidence of stifle arthritis than their counterparts. hereditary predisposition or trauma may be setting the horse up for the development of arthritis as well. You are correct in stating that the ability to sleep standing up is affected as the patella needs to be locked in place in order for the horse to completely rest. I'm not sure that you have any alternatives with your horse however but as I mentioned before be sure that you don't have any underlying joint disease prior to spending money on the surgery in case the underlying disease ends up being the limiting factor in your horse's ability to perform. I recently had someone interested in her for purchase and when their vet performed the prepurchase exam he concluded that there had been no radiographic change in the ankles since I bought her she had some loss of flexion in the ankles and was probably a 2 as well. I would point out that I got her straight off the track and she was sound and has remained sound to this day over one year since purchase I would enjoy hearing your comments on this matter and if you need further information please let me know. Bowers The significance of what you are describing for a hunter can be associated with the animal having a choppy gait which would definitely affect placement in a hunter class. Osselets are formed from chronic synovitis or capsulitis so the mechanisms that created the problem may still be in effect due to conformational problems slopping pastern for example. Management involves the use of intra-articular or intravenous hyaluronic acid when needed intramuscular Adequan and possible oral products such as Cosequin. 10 20 98 We have an eight year old quarter horse gelding with an obscure lameness. When he does pick it up he has trouble maintaining it particularly on turns.We have had four different vets look at him over the last 18 months resulting in different diagnoses ranging from navicular disease x-rays were negative sore right shoulder sore right hock sore back from ill-fitting saddle to conformation problem upright shoulder Suggested remedies included Bute rest better fitting tack exercise and a series of Adequan injections. The only notable improvement came after the Adequan Do you have any other ideas Is Adequan safe to continue using over time We hate to give up on this horse because he is such a sweetheart and a trier. It is imperative to perform diagnostic blocks to determine exactly where the lameness is in puzzling cases such as this. This horse's pattern fits all of the suspected diagnoses even navicular disease as radiographs do not determine the disease completely. I usually start by determining if the lameness improves with anti-inflammatory therapy and then go from there. Unfortunately the process can get expensive due to the time it takes and the extent of additional information needed e.g. The best place might be a University where costs may be cheaper but more importantly the time will be taken to evaluate the animal thoroughly. For the last two months she has had a slight swelling on her right front tendon.It is soft and puffy to touch but it does not bother her when we ride her or nor is it tender when pressure is applied and the swelling remains the same and she is not lame also there is no heat. Once the sheath is distended it is virtually impossible to get back to a normal appearance but it shouldn't cause a problem. If we are unable to treat her at the moment soaks poultice what might some of the worst case scenarios be Eventual recovery Disabling damage to internal hoof structure Your experience and advice appreciated. Bowers Worst case scenario would be a bone infection that ascends up the leg which could result in your having to euthanize for humane reasons. Additionally I would place the filly on systemic antibiotics and make sure that she is vaccinated for tetanus. 9 27 98 I have a 16-2 12yr old english t bred gelding after exercise yesterday a slight swelling was noticed on left hind leg below the hock is this a curb There is a little heat we are hosing down and applying an off the shelf cooling cream your comments much appreciated. Bowers What you are describing certainly sounds like a curb which is due to inflammation and thickening of the plantar ligament. Treatment is aimed at relieving the inflammation with systemic antiinflammatories local injection of steroids and topical cold therapy. Bowers In my teenage years I have become a knowledgeable horsewoman. Bowers Sounds like he may have hit the leg and is experiencing a traumatic synovitis. Bowers I would recommend the use of BAPTEN intralesionally combined with diligent therapy afterwards. 9 20 98 I just had your University do a genetics on my 2 year old mare University case HYP53485 I'm waiting to find out what percentage she is. Although just dragging hind toes and stumbling is an unusual presentation for an HYPP episode your filly would probably still benefit from limiting potassium in the diet. This is easily accomplished by using a combination of grass or oat hay and limited alfalfa and watching the content of supplements. There are other possibilities for persistent toe dragging and stumbling e.g. EPM or orthopedic problems and I would rule these out by having your veterinarian perform a thorough examination. 9 17 98 Hi there I have a lameness question for the vet and I hope this is the correct way to contact you We have a 6 year old quarter horse mare that we show in Western Pleasure on the National Circuit She is a Zippo Pine Bar Granddaughter Out of a Sugar Bar Mare. She has over 100 AQHA points and she Nationally qualified for the Youth World show and the Open World Show this year as well as getting her Superiors in Youth Western Pleasure and Senior Western Pleasure. Bowers These are very frustrating situations for owners especially when the problem isn't consistent. Important things to establish prior to having a veterinarian examine your horse to save time and money are 1 When you say this is an inconsistent behavior do you mean not expressed every time the animal is ridden or expressed periodically during a ride 2 How long has this been going on 3 Does the behavior change with antiinflammatories e.g. bute 4 Has the mare been vaccinated in the hindquarters and 5 Could there be any correlation with heat cycles What you are describing is an animal that is exhibiting a decreased cranial phase of a stride. When this isn't combined with a weight-bearing lameness you have to think that the problem lies with the structures that are involved with lifting and carrying the leg forward. The simplest problem would be a discomfort linked to the mare ovulating on the side and somehow the motion when the leg is brought underneath the mare is painful. Other considerations are an injury to the muscles and ligaments involved with lifting the leg and extending it forward. Answer the questions that I have provided make a video tape of the mare when she is exhibiting the behavior and you should be well prepared for a veterinarian to make a physical examination and hopefully find an answer for you. At this point in time he shows no discomfort in walking but I imagine as the colt develops further the loss of this muscle would definitely prevent him from racing and could in fact have. greater consequences. Any opinion would be greatly appreciated. Bowers Surprisingly this is not that uncommon an injury in young horses although I still don't know how they manage to injure the muscle. It usually seems to affect colts so it probably is a consequence of some serious rough-housing. The main therapy involves the use of antiinflammatories if there is still an active lameness both nonsteroidals and low levels of steroids and physical therapy. Additionally walking the animal daily using a rope to lift the affected leg and bring it equal in cranial phase with the normal leg is also important for ensuring normal development. 9 9 98 My four year old thoroughbred filly recently has demonstrated a buckling or spasm in the stifle area or hind knee joints. My vet described the condition as an upward fixation of the patella. Prior to exploring surgical alternatives he suggested weight reduction and exercise to help strengthen and lengthen the ligaments. I have exercised her on a lounge line and have noticed some improvement when exercised regularly. Other trainers have suggested various other treatments such as internal blistering etc. Would appreciate you candid opinion from the details I have described. Bowers I am not a fan of surgical intervention for correction of upward fixation of the patella. Some horses have developed arthritic changes in the stifle joint subsequent to cutting of the medial patellar ligament. The horse started spring training in spectacular fashion and then seemed to take a bad step upon the completion of a morning workout. This leads us to believe that fragments or shavings from the sesamoid should be minor in comparison. We would greatly appreciate your opinion on the aforementioned situation. Bowers Avulsion fractures of the sesamoid bone are a common occurrence following. I would recommend having an ultrasound examination performed on this horse to determine the status of the suspensory ligaments. A check ligament operation has been recommended and I would like to know if there are any other options to handling this problem. I would have this mare evaluated by a veterinarian that is competent in assessing whether this condition could be the case. Bowers My suspicion is that you have a case of tenosynovitis AKA windpuffs but you are right in thinking about getting an ultrasound performed. Tenosynovitis is an inflammation of the tendon sheath and is quite common in performance animals it is the body's response to repeated stress but doesn't necessarily indicate a serious problem. Bowers Without evaluating a radiograph I am unable to tell you if your horse has a solvable problem or not. As to veterinarians willing to travel to Turkey I would suggest you contact the American Association of Equine Practitioners which can be reached at www.aaep.org 4 26 98 I am thinking about purchasing a 1 2 arab 1 2 pinto that is 15 years old. Although it is correct that once a horse has experienced a case of laminitis they may be more sensitive towards its development again allot depends on the degree of damage sustained and the care of the horse afterwards. Vet has suggested to transport to Guelf University 700 miles from where she is in Ontario as this is the closest facility in Ontario for arthroscopy. Had also a standardbred trainer the best in the region out he felt it was also a sprain or pulled ligament and suggested blistering the joint which I have reservations about and felt the cost of the surgery was ridiculous in terms of the age of the horse and what she is used for pleasure and light showing Applied Arnica Oil and a product called DMSO to the area. He suggested a comfrey poultice and salve and also comfrey capsules in her feed. Is comfrey not a carcinogenic Should you have any articles relating to my problem please send forward. Unfortunately it was not diagnosed properly until he was dead lame and rotated 2 degrees. We debrided 90 percent of the hoof wall and began treatment with everything you could think of. My question is two fold first is this horse considered foundered and second since the damage was caused by white line disease will the laminae ever attach back to the coffin bone and correct the rotation. Bowers Technically if the coffin bone has rotated the horse is considered to have foundered. Any process which destroys the lamina is a form of laminitis whether it is from systemic disease or onchymycosis white line disease I have heard of a few cases where the coffin bone has come back into a more correct alignment with aggresssive farrier work and the use of heart bar shoes to provide constant frog pressure. If you have truly gotten the disease process under control and are lucky enough to not have any other traumatic occurrences happen to this horse's foot then I would expect to see a normally aligned hoof and coffin bone after the new hoof grows out. 2 28 98 We have a 2 year old thoroughbred colt in early breaking process that has been diagnosed by the vet at the training center with Epiphysitis. Bowers I am assuming that the physitis is limited to the distal radial growth plate in which case I would suggest backing off of training as he is probably not ready. One of the reasons that we radiograph two year olds prior to the onset of breaking is to determine if the distal radial growth plate is closed. He was being lunged and ridden in the area with a stock saddle late in the evening when he appeared tired and we are looking for another training facility. 2 22 98 I have a 3 yr old gelding diagnosed with a tear in his biceps muscle He is in the stall 2 grams Bute 2 a day opposite leg rubbed and wrapped for support. Bowers You are doing basically all we can do for muscle injuries aside from the addition of therapeutic ultrasound and possibly topical DMSO. Be sure that you have evaluated the tendon of the Biceps Brachii as well as the muscle because damage to this area can lead to a significantly longer recovery and a poorer prognosis for return to function. Bowers comments on the above topic The fact that you have muscle atrophy implies probable damage to the nerves that supplied the muscle. It is amazing how tincture of time can heal allot of injuries enabling animals to get around just fine in pasture. He eats well hips around his stall and is interested in everything that's going on.wish I had a crystal ball I guess is the end result is pasture safety and mibility for him then maybe it isn't all hopeless but to watch him shrink on a daily basis is hard. Our lesson is the advanced lesson-the best 7 riders in the barn so she let us jump 3'Well because my horse has been showing for a long time and she is older that is the max height we want to jump her at. Most veterinarians charges are all inclusive so that what you pay includes taking of the samples shipping charges and the laboratory charges. He seems to recover but how do I retrain him Have you knowledge of horses recovering after breaking a little piece of the outside lowest possible of the hip. In any case you need to have her examined by your veterinarian in the meantime do not ride and try to keep the mare confined to allow healing. 17.2HH TB gelding who recently deveolped splints in his left hind leg. Although extremely time consuming I have had remarkable results from clients that really took the time. The veterinarian that recommended this technique to me has quite an internationally renown reputation and I thought at the time he must be nuts but I have to admit it works. Protect the leg and limit to controlled excercise preferably walking on soft ground for the most cosmetic results. Although Brome hay is an excellent combination with alfalfa the protein in it can range from 4-20 Alfalfa usually sits around 18-20 or more so you may be experiencing an extreme protein overload. Another product that may benefit you is made by the company Select and it is called Mare and Foal. gelding has been lame for the past 3 months vets says arthritis in rr hock he is not getting better however with rest a reccomended. Bowers This is a difficult question to answer. Unfortunately lameness diagnoses really require examining the animal. If you are unsatisfied with the diagnosis made on your horse I would recommend a second opinion. Veterinary schools are great for getting horses examined because you get so many expert opinions. Bowers I think the University is a good place to start as the work up will be very thorough and the residents are usually quite good at explaining why procedures are being performed this is to benefit the students but you get the benefit as well. Nerve blocks are used to pinpoint exactly where the injury is on the leg in order to make better use of further diagnostics i.e. lidocaine either around a peripheral nerve to block an entire section of leg or within a joint itself for example if your horse appears to have his lameness truly originating from the hock joint the clinicians may opt to just place the anesthetic within the joint to see if this resolves the lameness. Lamenesses can be deceiving and what may seem to be the obvious source of the problem can turn out to be a red herring when diagnostics blocks are begun. between well-spaced starts in order to protect her from aggravating her problem. Having tried a few different shoeing options and still trying can you answer a couple of questions 1 is there a treatment pad on the market which she can run in which will protect while also delivering treatment 2 are there long term effects to using lifts in shoes note we plan to race her sparingly and retire her to breed in a year or so and 3 can you make any suggestions for resolution which we may not have thought of I appreciate your attention and thank you for the service you are providing. By raising the heel you actually increase load on the superficial flexor tendon contrary to what you would think. Considering that you are planning to retire this mare and breed her remember that if she has very long sloping pasterns and this is why she is running down you want to avoid that trait in any stallions you are considering. Although individuals may perform quite well with any number of conformational types we should try to avoid doubling-up on any one conformational trait that could predispose to physical problems even if both parents our outstanding individuals. Genetic potential is only as good as the physical package that will enable it to be successfully expressed. Home Contents Foals News Stallions Horse Division Team Members Feedback Send mail to webmaster@nwmanagement.com if you encounter any problems with this web site.
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    • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - http://www.ahsa.org/press/2000/reiber.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE. REIBER WITHDRAWS FROM WORLD CUP FINAL The American Horse Shows Association announced today that dressage rider Cheri Reiber has withdrawn her horse G Tudor from the World Cup Dressage Finals in s-Hertogenbosch Holland being held from March 23-26 2000. The 12 year-old bay gelding by Tudor KWPN owned by Reiber was presented to the veterinary panel on March 22 and held overnight for re-inspection. Reiber withdrew from the competition when G Tudor was found to be lame from the early development of a hoof abscess on the morning of March 23. Sherry Frank Assistant Secretary General of the AHSA spoke with Reiber over the last few days as the situation developed. Timing is everything we re very proud of her and everything she has accomplished. Reiber purchased G Tudor as a three-year-old and has trained him to grand prix level. ENDS For further information please call Chris Stafford Director of Communications on 606 225 6923 or via email cstafford@ahsa.org.
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    • Value of Radiographs - http://caltest.nbc.upenn.edu/LARAD/course/ctext2-4.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: THE VALUE OF RADIOGRAPHS cont'd SECTION 1 INTRO TO RADIOGRAPHY RADIOGRAPHIC ANATOMY Section 1 Figure 1-1 through 1-6 Section 2 Figure 1-7 through 1-13 Section 3 Figure 1-14 through 1-21 Section 4 Figure 1-22 through 1-28 SECTION 2 THE VALUE OF RADIOGRAPHS Section 1 Figure 2-1 through 2-13 Section 2 Figure 2-14 through 2-25 Section 3 Figure 2-26 through 2-62 Section 4 Figure 2-63 through 2-69 Section 5 Figure 2-70 through 2-83 Section 6 Figure 2-84 through 2-90 SECTION 3 DIFFERENTIALS OF BONE DISEASE Section 1 Figure 2-29 through 2-33 Section 2 Figure 2-34 through 235 Section 3 Figure 236 through 239 Section 4 Figure 240 through 243 Section 5 Figure 244 through 247 Section 6 Figure 249 through 251 Section 7 Figure 252 through 257 Section 8 Figure 258 through 265 Section 9 Figure 266 through 285 Section 10 Figure 286 through 295 Section 11 Figure 296 through 2100 Section 12 Figure 31 through 38 Section 13 Figure 310 through 318 Section 14 Figure 319 through 325 Section 15 Figure 326 through 332 Section 16 Figure 333 through 340 Section 17 Figure 341 through 347 Section 18 Figure 348 through 376 Section 19 Figure 377 through 386 Section 20 Figure 389 through 396 Section 21 Figure 397 through 3100 References Figure 2-63 is a radiograph of a horse s knee. The horse was found in the field non-weight bearing with swelling surrounding the joint and was sensitive to palpation and manipulation of the carpus. Differential diagnoses include traumatic injury involving the soft tissue structures and or bone. Figure 2-63 demonstrates a severely comminuted fracture of the accessory carpal bone. Figure 2-64 demonstrates how radiographs can help prove or disprove a tentative diagnosis. However when hoof testers were applied the horse seemed particularly sensitive along the distal and lateral aspect of the hoof. Your differentials How about a fractured coffin bone a hoof abscess and or a deep bruise A posterior digital nerve block with a ring around the front of the pastern region was performed to be certain that the lameness was attributable only to the foot. Figure 2-65 illustrates a fracture involving the wing of the third phalanx. Radiographic views of the foot of an acutely lame horse found out in the field can be seen in Figures 2-66 and 2-67 The radiographs indicate that there is a hoof wall separation which is indicative of a foot abscess of course you already knew that Figure 2-68 is another radiograph of an acutely lame horse's foot and the only radiographic abnormality is ossification of the collateral cartilage sidebone Sidebone is a secondary radiographic finding which does not cause an acute nonweightbearing lameness and is not relevant to this horse's clinical history. Horses can have fractures of the coffin bone that initially will not be visible on radiographs. Therefore follow-up films taken up to two weeks later would be necessary in order to confirm the fracture. In Figure 2-69 there is a small fragment of bone or calcification involving the extensor process of P3 It appears well rounded and smooth. This too is a radiograph of an acutely lame horse in which the lameness was attributable to the foot. Horses with these radiographic changes are not acutely lame and therefore this is a secondary radiographic finding not related to the lameness. Copyright 1995-2000 University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.
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    • Wet - Dry - Hot - Cold - http://www.anvilmag.com/farrier/wtdrhtcl.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Wet Dry Hot Cold Their Effects on Fungi Bacteria C Mike Wildenstein CJF published in ANVIL Magazine March 1995 In 385 b.c.e. Vegitus stressed everyday maintenance of the hooves of horses and made clear that it is preferable to treat an ailment as soon as it appears. The hooves were to be coated with a product that promoted the growth of the horn. It is generally thought that in Greco-Roman times horses were hot shod therefore the wearing down and deterioration of the hooves must have been a concern. Vegitus recommended these two ointments 1 three heads of garlic one bunch of rue about 20 gm alum in flakes 1 kg lard one handful of fresh donkey dung the ingredients to be mixed and boiled for application to the hooves while traveling 2 1.5 kg tar 0.5 kg wormwood nine heads of garlic 0.5 kg lard 0.75 liter old oil one sextarius vinegar the ingredients to be mixed and boiled. Vegitus gave suggestions for strengthening the hooves The circumstances of standing in a very clean stable without manure or moisture with stalls having oaken flooring strengthens the hooves. The sole as the most permeable of the horn tissues is most affected by bacterial and fungal infections. Hoof cracks chipped areas and horseshoe nail holes create environments conducive to fungal or bacterial growth. Susan Kempson show that poor-quality horn becomes even more permeable with prolonged soaking whereas normal horn did not become more permeable with prolonged soaking. Permeable horn also creates an environment conducive to microorganisms and fungi. Greasy hoof dressings seal in these fungi and microorganisms and create the anaerobic lacking oxygen environment needed for their proliferation. Microorganisms fungi and yeast are found on healthy hooves and being opportunists they take advantage of defects that provide the proper environment for proliferation. We need to be able to recognize the damage created by Fusobacterium necrophorum in the frog and more importantly deep in the central sulcus where it causes devastating effects on the integrity of the hoof. Learn to recognize the thin sole with a crater-like surface created by Staphylococcus and Spirochaeta microorganisms that are behind canker. The most talked-about demons of the hoof are pseudoallescheria boydii and scopulariopsis creating onychomycosis the dreaded white line disease. Inform your clients about feed supplements like Farrier's Formula to aid in the growth of good quality hooves. Discuss the benefits of routine hoof soakings and products like CleanTrax to eliminate the fungal infections that damage hooves.
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    • Conners to appeal $12,000 fine after Skalato is stripped of Caulfield Guineas victory - smh.com.au - Sport - http://www.smh.com.au/news/0011/21/sport/sport3.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Conners to appeal 12 000 fine after Skalato is stripped of Caulfield Guineas victory smh.com.au Sport Tuesday November 21 2000 Home Sport Article News Page One National World Features Arts Entertainment Column 8 Editorial Text Index Sport Sport News SportsToday Rugby Heaven League HQ The Pavilion RealFooty Biz Tech Business News Money Manager Trading Room I.T. News Icon Extra Letters News Review Spectrum Travel Sydney Weather TV Guide Visiting Weekends Away Market Shopping Jobs Property Cars Auctions I.T. Jobs Classifieds Services Advertise. paper e-mail handheld Help Audio video SPORT Conners to appeal 12 000 fine after Skalato is stripped of Caulfield Guineas victory Hollow victory Skalato heads for the winning post in the Caulfield Guineas. Photo PAT SCALA Skalato was last night disqualified from his Caulfield Guineas victory last month after a 9 hour stewards'inquiry. Skalato tested positive to the banned substance Ketoprofen a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory used to ease muscle soreness in a urine sample taken after the 750 000 Group 1 1 600m event. The colt's Sydney trainer Clarry Conners was fined 12 000 by Victoria Amateur Turf Club stewards over the positive test and Conners's son and assistant trainer Heath was fined 4 000. Among the witnesses to give evidence yesterday were veterinary surgeons John Crowley of Sydney and John Van Veenendaal of Melbourne. Connors will lose his winning trainer's fee of 48 750 and Skalato's Guineas jockey Patrick Payne will lose his winning bonus of 24 375. Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal representing Conners said an appeal would be lodged against last night's decisions within 48 hours. The stewards'report stated Mr Clarry Conners was found guilty of a charge of having brought Skalato to the Caulfield racecourse of the 14th October 2000 for the purpose of engaging in the Caulfield Guineas when it was found on analysis to have had administered to it a prohibited substance namely Ketoprofen. Meanwhile Group 1 warrior Sharscay will step out in a barrier trial at the Gold Coast today before embarking on a campaign that trainer Gerald Ryan hopes will lead to another autumn carnival campaign in Sydney. Sharscay has not raced since his gallant second to Streak in the Sydney Cup in May but Ryan is delighted with the way the nine-year-old is progressing. I may run him first-up in the Villiers around Christmas time or wait for the Bernborough Handicap. The Listed Bernborough Hcp 1 615m will be run at Doomben on January 6. Ryan was forced to scrap a spring campaign for Sharscay when the gelding developed a hoof abscess. An interesting newcomer is 1999 Silver Slipper Stakes winner Passmore formerly trained at Rosehill by Jack Denham. The four-year-old has not raced since finishing last at Warwick Farm on June 12 which followed a narrow Rosehill win his first since the Silver Slipper when he defeated Shogun Lodge. AAP go to top In this section Wales put up fight that was never on cards Strife of Ryan Girdler may miss final Conners to appeal 12 000 fine after Skalato is stripped of Caulfield Guineas victory Corruption questions put on hold Gabba looking green and mean Sunshine Boys bring ray of light Allan's mind on Cronje as he hits 300 Bid to curb southern spectacle Fighting a return to rugby's dark ages Hewitt set to hand Scud Masters spot Three young guns head out to build castles on the sand-belt courses of Melbourne Fortune spurs Tottenham on Time to give Farina free rein with Socceroos Site Guide Archive Feedback Privacy Policy Copyright C 2000.
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    • Hoof Wraps - http://www.equinehealthcare.com/products/ecbjwp4/itm00119.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Hoof Wraps Magnetic-NRG Hoof Wrap USD99.00. Constructed of high quality closed cell rubber with velcro tabs for adjustable fit. Each wrap contains a unipolar magnetic strip. Magnetic strips stimulate the natural healing process and pain relief alleviating problems assiciated with slow hoof growth navicular disease stone brusing ring bone side bone improper shoeing hot nails quarter cracks founder hoof abscess thrush brusied soles. Ref Description Price Quantity Required Add To Basket 130340462 Hoof Wraps 99.00 1 pair Proceed to the checkout and view the contents of your basket.
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    • Flying Changes - http://www.pvda.org/page8a.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Flying Changes. Flying Changes. League Final Winner forced to Withdraw from World Cup Final. In 1995 when the World Cup Final was held in Los Angeles CA Robert Dover had to withdraw Devereaux due to a hoof abscess. Christine Taurig Etienne 66.02 From the www.uset.com website PVDA Member Barn Fire. At the end of March long-time PVDA member and AHSA R judge Susan Carr Turning Point Farm Clarksburg MD lost one of her horse barns in an electrical fire late at night. Susan was one of 3 dressage riders featured in The Equiery's September 1999 annual dressage issue. Check out their website for more information including dressage horses for sale www.darkhorsestables.com USDF Jr YR photo contest PVDA Member Elizabeth Goodwin won second place in the Posed category. supposed to change The following whips are permitted for schooling only A standard longeing whip and 2 whips no longer than 6'including lash. The CORRECT version of 1921.9 should read The following whips are permitted for schooling only A standard longeing whip and 2 whips no longer than 6'including lash. One whip no longer than 4'including lash may be carried in all classes except AHSA USDF Championships AHSA Junior Team Championships USET Championships USET Qualifying and Selection Trials and Observation classes. Exception Competitors riding sidesaddle may carry a whip in AHSA USDF Championships. New AHSA Freestyle rule For the benefit of those who may not be familiar with the new freestyle requirement which is effective as of 12 1 99 it reads as follows AHSA Rule Book Art. 1928.9 Except at AHSA USDF Championships in order to enter a freestyle class at any AHSA level a horse rider combination must have competed in the highest test of the declared freestyle level or any test of a higher level at an AHSA recognized show. 1999 AHSA Awards Honor Equestrians and Dressage Today The AHSA announced the winners of its annual awards in January at its convention in Las Vegas Nevada. Recipients included Debbie McDonald who was named 1999 Equestrian of the Year John Jack Fritz who received the 1999 Sportsmanship Award Maj. Three Dutch stallions topped the Sporthorse Owners and Breeders Association's SOBA list of North American FEI-level dressage sires for 1999. Darwin Roemer Zonnatetti Pion owned and ridden by Donna Day of Franklin New Jersey is the leading sire of FEI dressage horses. Darwin's thee FEI-level offspring averge 65.68 percent and include Impressario owned and ridden by Lynda Alicki-Gilchrist Inkognito owned by Susan Miller and Robert Howard and Intendo owned by Julie Taylor. For more information on SOBA call 850-893-8532 e-mail or visit the web site at Olympic Dressage Calendar and Officials. 29 Grand Prix Special Saturday Sept 30 Grand Prix Freestyle individual dressage medal ceremony Judges. Mary Seefried of Australia Reserve Judge Technical Advisor. www.olympics.com Official Site Olympic Co-ordination Authority www.uset.org USET www.horsesport.org FEI www.olympic.org International Olympic Committee IOC www.ahsa.org AHSA Don't Miss George Stubbs Last Trip To Virginia. The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts will exhibit a comprehensive collection of works by famous equestrian artist George Stubbs 1724-1806 from Feb. The exhibit has been assembled by the Yale Center for British Art as a memorial to the late collector and horseman Paul Mellon by gathering for the last time artwork from Yale and the VA Museum of Fine Arts and those from Mellon's private home in Upperville VA. The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is located at Boulevard and Grove Avenue in Richmond VA. The Stubbs Tour catalog is 26.00 call the Museum Shop 800-943-8632. If you do not receive yours by February 28th please contact Hilltop Farm at 410-658-9898. The Virginia Dressage Association's Northern Virginia and Charlottesville chapters will host a Celebrity Musical Freestyle Dressage Competition to benefit the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation on May 13 2000 at Culpeper's Virginia Commonwealth Park. The afternoon and evening program will feature horses performing dressage movements to music from the beginning First level to the advanced Grand Prix level. Horse and rider teams will be judged by a panel of celebrities including former Senators Howard Baker and Nancy Kassebaum former Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger actor Tom Berringer actress Sissy Spacek and film director Hugh Wilson. Lorraine MacDonald an international dressage judge from Canada will also preside. Special Patron seating is available and includes admission for all programs afternoon refreshments a catered and specially prepared dinner under the tent at ringside with the Celebrity Panel of Judges. Between performances there will be a variety of exciting and interesting exhibitions. Sunday May 14 the Virginia Dressage Association's Northern Virginia and Charlottesville chapters will host a dressage show recognized by the American Horse Show Association. For information on Patron seating call Marlene Eagleburger 804 977-7175. Flying Changes Archives Front page What is Dressage Who are We Juniors Young Riders Shows Programs Special Events Events Calendar Newsletter Other Interesting Sites Join Us Email Us.
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    • equipodiatry.com, Penetration Wounds of the Equine Foot - http://www.equipodiatry.com/penewoun.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: equipodiatry.com Penetration Wounds of the Equine Foot. Background Podiatry How To. Topic of the Month hoof.net Links NORTHERN VIRGINIA EQUINE. O'Grady DVM MRCVS Penetration wounds of the equine foot can be classified as indirect or direct. Most indirect penetration occurs through the sole-wall junction commonly known as the white line Figure 1 This vital area of defense lies between the sole and the hoof wall and its stability depends upon adequate strength and thickness to protect it from trauma. Once the structure of the white line has been disrupted bacteria enters and migrates to the subsolar tissues causing a localized abscess commonly known as a gravel. Debris gravel penetrates the white line and mechanically introduces bacteria into the circulatory system of the foot. that puncture or are forced through the protective horn sole or frog to the underlying sensitive tissue. The site of penetration and vital underlying structures involved become major concerns when evaluating the severity of the injury. It is the opinion of the author that all injuries of this type be considered as potentially career or life threatening until proven otherwise. Indirect penetration wounds Conditions that cause mechanical breaks or weakness in the continuity of the white line are improper trimming leading to hoof imbalance long toe-underrun heel syndrome excessive toe length heels too high h oof wall separations white line disease seedy toe aggressive removal of sole and chronic laminitis. Excessive moisture or dryness may also contribute to weakness in the white line. Once a hoof abscess is present the animal will show marked lameness increased digital pulse heat and one may see soft tissue swelling in the lower limb on the side of the infection. After the foot is cleaned and trimmed properly visual examination will generally show that the white line is widened and contains small discreet fissures. Establishing drainage is the most important aspect of therapy. The offending fissure is opened on the hoof wall side of the white line using a 2 mm bone curette or other suitable probe. A small opening is sufficient to obtain proper drainage and care must be taken to avoid exposing solar corium as it will invariably prolapse through the opening and create an ongoing source of pain. Drainage is enhanced by the application of an Animalintex R poultice for the first 48 hours. Under no circumstances should an opening be created in the adjacent sole. Instead a small channel should be made on the hoof wall side of the white line in a vertical direction following the tract to the point where it courses inward. Delay in treatment promotes excessive soft tissue involvement and migration of the infective process through the coronary band. This scarring becomes significant for high speed performance animals and for breeding stock that are allowed to develop dished horn capsules due to long toes or any other hoof imbalance. Pain that persists after coronary band rupture or when drainage is established requires immediate veterinary attention with radiographs to rule out early bone infection. Most horses with subsolar abscess spontaneously recover within a few days of treatment a few develop complications such as osteomyelitis which can become life threatening. Prevention Prevention is achieved through proper hoof care and centers around promoting a strong solid white line which resists penetration by debris. Excessive toe length increases the bending force exerted on the toe leading to a widening and weakening of the white line. To prevent gravels it is important that the foot be trimmed in a manner that accentuates a strong healthy foot. The use of hoof hardeners Keratix R and bedding the horse on shavings or sawdust may be useful to harden the feet during extremely wet weather or when the horse is being washed frequently such as during horse shows. During dry weather a hoof dressing such as a combination of cod liver oil and pine tar mixed in a ratio of 3 1 painted on the entire foot may help to contain moisture. Preventing indirect penetration is therefore dependent on providing adequate protection to the underlying sensitive structures. The hoof capsule has a natural ability to provide such protection and it is imperative that we strive to enhance these strong features through proper trimming. Excessive removal of protective horn is a common practice as emphasis is often placed on eye appeal instead of functional strength. The final outcome is determined by the depth of penetration size of the penetrating object location of penetration tissues involved and the duration of time before treatment is instituted. When a foreign object such as a nail piece of wire or glass is identified its location depth and direction of penetration must be evaluated with the aid of radiographs. If a foreign body especially a nail is found in the foot a radiograph should be taken with the object in place Figure 2 This is especially important when dealing with puncture wounds to the frog because after the object is removed the elastic nature of the frog seals up the wound much the same as a piece of rubber. It is commonly believed that a wound will not become infected if it bleeds after a foreign object is removed and antiseptic is applied. Bacteria is carried into the deeper structures with the foreign body seeds the area and when the wound seals upon removal of the object drainage is prevented and abscessation occurs. Puncture wounds in the area of the sole can lead to infections or fractures of the coffin bone while puncture wounds that penetrate the frog or bar have a high probability of affecting other vital structures such as the deep digital flexor tendon and its sheath the navicular bone the navicular bursa and the coffin joint. Conservative medical therapy consisting of soaking the foot and systemic antibiotics will invariably fail if these structures are involved unless sufficient surgical debridement is performed early to allow drainage of these tissues. If the coffin bone is involved any fractured or abnormal bone should be removed and drainage established. When vital structures over the frog area are involved a surgical procedure known as a street nail surgery is performed. In this procedure a window is cut around the puncture wound all devitalized tissue is removed and drainage is established. Successful treatment requires an early and accurate diagnosis coupled with aggressive therapy. Figure 1 Ground surface of hoof Figure 2 Lateral x-ray which reveals nail extending to navicular bursa.
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    • Infections - http://www.patentskon.com/english/infections.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Hoof infections and their cause bacteria The obvious connection between a lame horse and a hoof in a bad condition can be seen when a visible hoof abscess leads to lameness. Such a hoof infection often results in swelling of the suspensory ligament and the flexor tendon also. That there is a great difference between an apparently healthy hoof and an absolutely healthy hoof can be understood when the trimming of a hoof reveals old dried-up hoof abscesses which appear as cavities in the hoof. Another hoof infection causes pressure-sensitive tender hooves and the horse then reacts to the use of a tong This is particularly evident with so-called trotter hoof cancer a condition in which the sole of the hoof is blood-filled and has a very loose consistence the horse accepts even maximum pressure when the hoof is healthy Swollen suspensor ligament and flexor tendon are in most cases the result of hoof infections and can be relieved quickly by treatment of the hoof infection. A common condition When the shoe is removed for reshoeing a hoof shod 4 or more weeks ago a putrescent mass of dead hoof material blackened by bacterial action may be seen. A deterioration of the connection between sole and hoof capsule may be evident even when the hoof is trimmed radically and there may be hoof cracking in the barrs bleeding and more or less obvious stone bruises. It is here that there is a continuous contest between the horse's defence against infection and all the different bacteria to which the hoof is exposed. You as a horseowner groom trainer and farrier are involved in this conflict. Your weapons in the struggle are Anti-Tetanus vaccine Iodine and Copper sulphate. Tetanus is always present in the hoof environment and horses should always be vaccinated against this scourge. Australian producers of veterinary medicines recommend intervals between vaccinations of from one year to four years considerably more frequently than is customary in Sweden. Iodine is strongly antibacterial and is therefore suitable for combatting infections. Trim the hooves radically cut away all black tissue attacked by bacteria treat with copper sulphate by direct application of the powder or a 60 gr liter solution.
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    • Farrier Science - http://www.neosoft.com/~iaep/pages/farrier/farrierscience.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Farrier Science. Farrier Science Secrets of foot care Review Therapeutic hoof related products by Dr. Ric Redden Take a look at Equine Podiatry Center a great web site by Dr. University of Tennessee Do you remember that pair of shoes that hurt your feet Now you know how your horse's hooves feel when improperly shod or trimmed. So how do you select a qualified farrier Obviously you want someone who is knowledgeable proficient and professional. Some individuals can satisfactorily shoe a normal horse but are stumped when an unusual problem occurs. You want a farrier who understands anatomy physiology and pathology of the hoof and leg and is experienced in correcting problems. As with most craftsmen your farrier should make the job look effortless and attractive. In today's horse industry winning can be worth thousands of dollars. For a horse to be effective in performance or pleasure riding it must be properly shod with each hoof correctly balanced. They should conduct themselves in a competent manner treat your horse properly and service their accounts. As in any service oriented business farriers must keep up to date on the latest information and technology including membership in professional organizations and attending seminars clinics and workshops. The American Farrier's Association has three levels of certificationIntern Farriers Certified Farriers and Certified Journeyman Farriers. Intern farriers have completed a farrier school passed a written test on anatomy gaits and shoeing practices. They also must pass a practical test shoeing a horse to an accepted standard in a specified time. Certified farriers must have been shoeing for at least a year and passed both a written and a practical test including making a sample set of shoes. A Certified Journeyman farrier has shod horses for a minimum of two years and passed a written and a practical test shoeing a horse with handmade shoes to a set standard in two hours. Ask horse owners and veterinarians for references of capable farriers in your area. HORSE INFORMATION phone 4239747295 fax 4239747297 HOOF CARE FOR HORSES. You are neglecting your horse's hooves if a farrier is not trimming or shoeing your horse periodically. This prevents such problems as thrush a bacterial hoof infection. Muckingout is removal of wet and soiled bedding and adding fresh bedding to the horse's stall. Horses should be trained at an early age to have their legs and hooves handled and to stand properly while being trimmed shod or cleaned. The length of time between trimming varies depending on how fast the hoof wall grows whether the terrain wears down the hoof and the activity of the horse. But all horses even broodmares and foals need to have their hooves inspected and trimmed regularly by a professional farrier. HORSE INFORMATION phone 4239747295 fax 4239747297 November 18 1997 Chronic Foot Soaking Soaking the equine foot in solution may not be beneficial since excessive moisture damages the hoof wall Stephen E. O'Grady DVM As far back as I can remember soaking the equine foot has played a major role in the treatment of common foot ailments such as abscesses puncture wounds corns foot bruising and laminitis Figure 1 Over the years I have questioned the therapeutic value of this practice. Does soaking the foot actually draw infection out increase circulation or does it just plain soften the foot In my opinion the principle indication for soaking feet is to soften hard hooves so that it's easier to pare the sole to expose and drain an abscess. In this circumstance foot soaking is performed over a very limited time period 12 to 24 hours What happens to the foot during chronic foot soaking that's done on a regular basis for days or even weeks to draw out an abscess or treat sole bruising etc. As the softening process continues the horse begins to walk on the sole creating another source of discomfort. Damages Periople It is believed that soaking damages the protective barrier periople on the hoof wall and creates a stretching of the white line on the solar surface thereby allowing additional microorganisms to penetrate and further damage the wall. Chronic foot soaking for an abscess can actually prolong the healing process. In many cases the pocket resulting from the accumulation of exudate from the abscess will be prevented from draining and drying up as the softened structures of the chronically soaked foot compress the affected area. Use A COFA Poultice An alternative method of localizing abscesses or drawing out inflammation is done through the use of a poultice. The poultice provides a warm moist hydroscopic environment which stays in contact with the foot 24 hours a day but does not have the detrimental effects of continuous soaking. There are many good commercial poultices on the market Figure 2 A medicated poultice Animalintex 2 is an excellent first choice when a poultice is indicated. The Animalintex poultice made of multiple layers of medication-impregnated cotton sheets is immersed in hot water the excess water is squeezed out and the poultice is applied to the foot covering the ground surface and extending over the coronary band. Moist heat applied to the coronary band may also help an abscess break out spontaneously. Another useful form of poultice is a combination of wheat bran and Epsom salts 2 parts bran and 1 part salts This poultice is cumbersome but has certainly withstood the test of time. Packing the foot with Ichthammol or a combination of Ichthammol and glycerin is also used frequently with good results according to reports. An ideal foot bandage is a medium-sized disposable diaper covering the enclosed medication. 3 A rubber Easyboot can also be used for protection but is difficult to place over a hoof that is bandaged with a poultice. Two clinical situations in which foot soaking has traditionally been a major part of treatment involve hoof abscesses and foot bruising. Similarly with chronic subsolar foot bruising foot soaking has been prescribed to draw out the inflammation and discomfort. Treating Abscesses When presented with a horse that is acutely lame and shows pain every-where on hoof testers soaking in hot water during the first 12 to 24 hours may be useful to localize the abscess. Subsolar abscesses gain entry to the underlying corium through a defect or separation in the white line or a penetrating wound through the sole. The area of pain is localized with hoof testers and then explored superficially with a hoof knife until the point of entry is located. In the case of a suspected nail abscess the foot is poulticed until soft enough to explore or until the nail abscess has ripened and can be drained. When the tract is located in the white line the abscess is drained by notching out the adjacent hoof wall using a bone curette rather than removing any sole Figure 3 By using a small bone curette the tract can be followed at an angle under the sole. The sole is left intact for protection and no sensitive tissue is exposed Figure 4 A large opening is not necessary for drainage. If pressure is applied to the adjacent sole and additional exudate is expressed or if a bubble is observed there is adequate drainage. When weight is borne on the affected foot exudate will be continually forced out and drainage will be maintained. Soaking the foot once in a hypertonic solution at the time an abscess is drained may also have some merit. However in order for any solution to draw infection or clean up the affected area the solution must be hypertonic which can be achieved by saturating it with a salt. Chronic foot soaking for an abscess can actually prolong the healing process. In many cases the pocket resulting from the accumulation of exudate from the abscess will be prevented from draining and drying up as the softened structures of the chronically soaked foot compress the affected area. Alternatively my preference is to flush the wound under pressure with a dilute solution of povidone iodine Betadine Betadine is an antiseptic but also has antimicrobial and astringent drying properties. Gauze sponges saturated with Betadine are applied to the bottom of the foot and a bandage is applied. The antiseptic pack is changed on a daily or every-other-day basis until the tract is dry and soundness has returned. Alternatively once marked improvement has been observed a wide web shoe with a 5 16-inch hole drilled directly over the draining tract in the white line may be applied. Cotton saturated with an antiseptic is packed in the drilled hole and a stud guard is screwed in the hole to keep the medication in place Figure 5 The medication is changed on a daily basis. Puncture Wounds If a puncture wound in the sole has occurred veterinary care is necessary. If a large wound is created excess granulation tissue will prolong the healing and cornification of the tissue in the defect. Foot Bruising Subsolar bruising may be a cause-and-effect situation in that there is usually a predisposing factor causing the bruising. The sole is not designed to support weight and flat-footed horses are prone to chronic foot bruising. Flat soles may be normal for a particular horse or may be caused by a disease process such as a flexure deformity previous or chronic laminitis by farrier care as in the case of the long-toe low-heel conformation by excess removal of hoof wall leading to sole pressure or by excessive removal of horny sole. Foot soaking has traditionally played a major role in the treatment of bruised soles in an attempt to draw out or relieve inflammation. In reality chronic soaking may make the problem worse by softening the foot to the point where the sole provides even less protection to the sensitive corium above. It's my opinion that treatment of foot bruises should be directed toward toughening the hoof capsule relieving inflammation systematically using Butazolidin and possibly a vasodilator and correcting the cause of the bruising. Instead of soaking the horse is placed in a stall with shavings or sawdust to allow the feet to dry out. Preparations which toughen the hoof capsule and sole can be applied daily if desired. This may consist of not removing any sole from the ground surface backing up the toe from the dorsal wall and moving the plane of support in a palmar direction. Bill Moyer is a square-toe egg bar with the sole surface of the shoe well concaved using a hand grinder Figure 6 The bar shoe will provide more surface area to the foot and the concave solar surface of the shoe will eliminate direct pressure of concussion on the bruised sole. Conclusion There has been very little if any veterinary research on the therapeutic value of soaking horses'feet. It may be one of those age-old traditions that have been passed down from horseman to horseman or maybe somebody once said it was a good thing to do and no one has wanted to contradict that. If we look at the anatomy of the foot its physiology and the thickness of the hoof capsule it becomes questionable whether soaking in water provides any benefits. As foot soaking remains a controversial issue between the veterinary and farrier professions continued communication between both parties is essential to assess its benefits. Distributed in the United States by Kustom Enterprises Nicholasville Ky. Frank Gravlee has been developing equine nutritional products for two decades. His greatest success came with development of a supplement for the horse's hooves. On the subject of supplements he says it is good to keep in mind how quickly both good and bad nutritional changes should be seen in the hooves. If a horse does have a noticeable hoof problem and a nutritional program is begun to solve it there should be a positive difference emerging from the coronary band within eight to ten weeks. Whether from wheat rice oats or other grains bran contains phytate which is high in phosphorous which blocks absorpton of calcium in the small intestine creating a systemic calcium deficiency undermining hoof health. Biotin is often thought of as the most important ingredient in a diet for hoof health. Gravlee says Biotin alone is not enough to correct poor horn quality in most cases as it is only one of many nutrients needed by the adult horse. In fact the adult horse is said to have no dietary requirement for biotin unless under stress conditions such as intense work traveling being stabled for long periods or being fed a low-quality diet. And even under these conditions biotin deficiency is relatively rare and is usually accompanied by many other dietary deficiencies. Horses which respond to biotin supplementation alone approximately 5 of those with poor-quality horn show large holes in the outermost layer of the wall when viewed under a microscope. Gravlee says Methionine proline glycine and glutamine are some of the major building blocks of healthy connective tissue or collagen. Copper and vitamin C are also necessary serving as catalysts in the formation of strong and healthy horn. All these nutrients should be supplied via diet or supplementation for healthy hooves. Essential fatty acids are necessary for a healthy shiny coat as well as the proper moisture maintenance and pliability of the hoof structure he says. These fatty acids can be obtained from grain unprocessed grain oils cooked whole soybeans or the lecithin found in processed grains and supplements. Healthy hooves require zinc for the prevention of defective keratin Dr. You can provide the proper quantities of zinc through diet or supplementation. Salt requirements beyond metabolic needs are based almost entirely on the amount a horse sweats while trace minerals are a metabolic need and are relatively steady irrespective of exercise and ambient temperature. When salt and trace minerals are fed together in block or loose form horses are force-fed trace minerals according to their salt needs. Gravlee suggests feeding a high-quality hay a single balanced supplement and grains as needed. He believes however that it is generally a good idea to provide horses free-choice loose salt to ensure their salt needs are being met. Therefore salt-depleted or addicted horses may bite off a chunk and swallow it creating an abundance of hoof-destructive urine. Gravlee recommends his Farrier's Formula supplement for the healthiest feet possible. He emphasizes that his formula was developed through comprehensive nutritional profiles of hundreds of horses and was later subjected to independent university studies in which hoof parings were examined under electron and light microscopes. These findings showed that feeding Farrier's Formula produced noticeably better-organized and stronger horn. Frank Gravlee DVM MS CNS graduated from Auburn University School of Veterinary Medicine and practiced for several years before attending graduate school at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During a three-year residency in nutritional pathology he received a Master's degree in nutritional biochemistry and intermediary metabolism and is a board-certified nutrition specialist. Gravlee has written several articles on the relationship between laboratory findings and clinical problems in the field of equine nutrition. is spearheading an effort to introduce legislation in the form of the Practicing Farrier Certification Act. This act is currently being presented to state government officials in South Carolina North Carolina and Georgia. The Act will require practicing farriers to 1 certifiy with a state approved national certification body 2 carry a state mandated minimum of professional liability insurance 3 certify within 12 months of passage of the act if currently uncertified 4 to obtain liability insurance within 90 days passage of the Act 5 To register with the state department of agriculture 6 to pay an annual nominal license fee to the state to maintain the database and enforcement 7 and to abide by the enforcement of the department of agriculture. Of course there are some other minor contingencies in the act but these are the main points of relevance Officials within the state departmennts of agriculture have been notified of the proposal along with the applicable subcommitties. Liotti stated that legislation of this type has been both needed and anticipated but also added that up until this point in time farriers may have expected and successfully resisted regulation of any kind but today's equine industry demands this bare minimum of qualifications and standardization. Your organization or publication is encouraged to contact Equine Consumer Ltd. concerning any requests for information and we also urge you to conduct an interview with Mr. Not only are consumers getting effective representation but the welfare of our livestock is being protected. equineconsumerltd@juno.com Sent to Porcilina@aol.com ARFFMain@aol.com DressageCT@Equiresource.com DTletters@aol.com equuslts@aol.com gerlbetty@aol.com gdcta@america.net FranJurga@aol.com smeiler@aol.com hrsenrider@aol.com editor@thebee.com thunder@netins.net ighahorseaid@earthlink.net vetdata@inland.net mer@eclipse.net soar@waste.org genesis@arktrust.org MikeM@fund.org 102546.1255@compuserve.com Subject Practicing Farrier Certification Act Official Press release 0-6 11-12 20-21 23-24 26-27 32-33 40-47 Jan 1 7 Shoers Inducted Into International Horseshoeing Hall Of Fame Seven farriers have been recognized for their significant contributions to the horseshoeing profession by being inducted into the 1997 International Horseshoeing Hall Of Fame. The 1997 class which was announced in the December 1996 issue of American Farriers Journal includes Doug Butler of LaPorte CO Lee Green of Yucaipa CA H.R. Kappy Kaplin of Wimauma FL George Martin of Ignacio CO Bob Skradzio Sr. of Ambler PA Eddie Watson of Keswick VA and Vincent Whelan of Kingston Nova Scotia Canada. The inductees who were selected from a field of 80 farriers nominated by horse owners shoers equine veterinarians and others in the horse industry bring to 52 the number of members in the Hall Of Fame which is co-sponsored by the American Farriers Journal and the Kentucky Derby Museum. This program honors farriers who have made significant contributions to the shoeing profession and have left an indelible impression on their peers and clients in regards to equine hoof care. Following are footnotes on the seven farriers chosen for the International Horseshoeing Hall Of Fame Doug Butler is the owner of Butler Publishing And Farrier Services and the Butler Graduate Farrier Training school. He is well-known for authoring the widely used farriery textbook The Principles of Horseshoeing. He is an American Farrier's Association Certified Journeyman Farrier a Fellow of the Worshipful Company of Farriers in England and has previously taught farriery and equine care at California State Polytechnic University Sul Ross State University Northwest Missouri State University and Colorado State University. Green has participated in many shoeing clinics to benefit injured or ill farriers and was one of the driving forces behind The Box which raised nearly 64 000 since 1983 to benefit farriery programs. Kappy Kaplin was a farrier in the jumping horse industry for more than 50 years. George Martin has been lauded by horse owners in southwest Colorado for his professional conduct and dependability. Wrote one client in her nomination presentation George possess professional attributes that contribute greatly to his success including an open mind willingness to work with veterinarians sensitivity for the animals he works with and especially his continued quest for knowledge. Bob is one of the best all-around horseshoers and gives more down-to-earth information in his clinics than any person in the country wrote one admirer. Eddie Watson recently retired after 50 years in the shoeing industry. A veterinarian wrote that Watson was the leading farrier in Virginia for more than 30 years and was the mentor for many farriers in the mid-Atlantic area. Vincent Whelan is considered by many to be the top farrier in the Maritime provinces of Canada. I have the assurance of knowing my horses were knowledgeably treated with the most current procedures as well as with kindness and consideration. These seven farriers were selected by a vote of the 52 members of the International Horseshoeing Hall of Fame and staff members of the American Farriers Journal. To nominate farriers for the 1998 class of inductees list them on separate pieces of paper and include any information you feel is important for judges to take into account. Include your name address and phone number and send to American Farriers Journal Attn Horseshoeing Hall Of Fame P.O. For that reason American Farriers Journal has decided to recognize and honor equine vets for their contributions to equine hoof health with the establishment of the International Equine Veterinarians Hall of Fame. Since 1993 the American Farriers Journal in conjunction with the Kentucky Derby Museum has spearheaded the induction of farriers into the International Horseshoeing Hall of Fame. Horse owners trainers farriers and equine veterinarians may contribute to the search for inductees by sending nominations to the American Farriers Journal by Saturday Feb. Each year the American Farriers Journal will honor outstanding equine veterinarians who are keenly involved in foot care in two critical areas 1 the practicing veterinarian who works closely with farriers on foot care concerns in the field on a daily basis and 2 the college or industry equine veterinarian involved in teaching research or other aspects of hoof care. Include any information you feel is important for judges to take into account when considering the nominees. Please mail nominations to Equine Vets Hall Of Fame c o American Farriers Journal P O Box 624 Brookfield WI 53008-0624.
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    • Canada's Gina Smith Makes World Cup Dressage Final Debut - http://www.atlanticrider.com/national71.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Canada's Gina Smith Makes World Cup Dressage Final Debut National International News. Canada's Gina Smith Makes World Cup Dressage Final Debut by Jennifer Ward Canada's Gina Smith of Brockville ON finished in fourteenth position overall yesterday in the annual World Cup Dressage Final held March 23-26 in s-Hertongenbosch NED. Competing against the top dressage riders in the world Smith earned a percentage of 60.20 in the grand prix with Fledermaus a 13-year-old grey Dutch Warmblood gelding by Purioso. The Dutch dominated this year's Final with Coby Van Baalen and Olympic Ferro finishing in second position while Arjen Teeuwissen and Gestion Goliath T were third. representative Cheri Reiber was forced to withdraw G Tudor when it was discovered he was suffering from a hoof abscess. After the grand prix Australian representative Rosamund Ryan's hopes of completing her first World Cup Final came to an end when her horse Excellent was injured by a nail piercing the hoof. Smith a 1988 Olympic bronze medallist spent time in Germany training with her long-time coach Jo Hinnemann in preparation for the Final. Smith earned her World Cup berth and also celebrated her 42nd birthday by winning the 1999 Swarovski Canadian League Dressage Final at last November's Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto ON.
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    • Treating Founder (Chronic Laminitis) Without Shoes--Guest Posts 2-18-2000 to 8-1-2000 - http://members.screenz.com/GretchenFathauer/guestposts4.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Treating Founder Chronic Laminitis Without Shoes-Guest Posts 2-18-2000 to 8-1-2000. Treating Founder Chronic Laminitis without Horseshoes Guestbook posts 2-18-2000 to 8-1-2000 Gretchen Fathauer's replies are in red type. Date 2 18 00 Time 8 38 19 AM Remote User Comments. Of course I could only do this with him in a girth and chest hoist otherwise it was too painful for him to let me trim Today is 02 17 00 and I am down to a relatively healthy frog and taking out hoof mass in the heel area to promote heel flexibility. Sincerely David Gorin 304 924-5897 sarag@neumedia.net Gretchen Fathauer's reply to David Gorin-Wow What an ambitious project God bless you for trying to help this poor horse It is a shock to hear of such a young horse so badly neglected and in such bad shape. I have my fingers crossed for you both Gretchen Fathauer Click here for sling plans sling for sale and update on David's horse Date 2 18 00 Time 10 32 40 PM Remote User Comments. Pat Bishop pbishop@ferno.com Date 2 21 00 Time 2 36 07 AM Remote User Comments. I can't emphasize how uplifting it was just reading your article. My husband is a farrier and has had success treating laminitic and foundered horses with shoes and without.we have an extremely troubling case we are working on right now NOTHING works and I will have the vet check out your page and Dr. The frequent trims make so much sense but it is next to impossible to convince clients that Nelson should be back in 3-4 weeks let alone 1-2x week and I hate to encourage having them do it themselves because either they simply won't or they'll screw it up We will get a copy of Dr. Strasser's book and watch your website for updates It took a lot of time to do I am sure Maggie Mieske mmieske@netonecom.net www.netonecom.net mmieske Gretchen Fathauer's reply to Maggie Mieske-It really is a tough situation trying to help horses whose owners will not follow through. THANK YOU Debbie McRoberts Wade@McRoberts.com Date 3 2 00 Time 3 54 46 AM Remote User Comments. Most signs of navicular disappear w i a few shoeings if the owner will keep the horse in moderate consistent exercise often even if they will not. I have a 21-year-old Morgan who has been experiencing laminitis attacks since he was about 7. I followed their suggestions with the result that he experienced severe rotation. I have years of x-rays tests for Lyme disease Cushing's syndrome have stopped all vaccinations tried heartbars dental impression material do fecal tests now before worming tried sabre sneakers Easy boots Davis boots confinement dry-lotting. Now I am certain it is a largely mechanical problem stemming from incorrect trimming which was exacerbated by the decreased exercise he got when I was away. I have felt for years that he was walking a tightrope and that the trigger was anything that added a little stress like new hay or decreased activity. I am laboriously printing all these site sections for my farrier and vet not because I will change my mind if they don't agree but because it may help someone else. Gerry Nichols gnichols@oasisonline.com Date 3 7 00 Time 12 58 44 AM Remote User Comments. Could I be dealing with another problem This mare was on straight pasture at the time her founder started and is in the field w 8 horses roaming 250 acres but I check them daily and no other horses have had this problem. I read your site several times and probably spent several days researching this on the web. Further horses trimmed or shod very stumpy are short-strided rough-gaited and clumsy. Needless to say stick to your guns Gretchen Fathauer Date 3 7 00 Time 10 27 14 PM Remote User Comments. DMG and MSM has been recommended to give her There is also a Bio-Meth powder out that contains dl-methionine and biotin that I may try Defiately bookmarked this page. are all good but no supplements can do what correct trimming and constant walking around in 24 hour freedom and company will do. I am convinced that the thirteen years of shoes and the corrective shoeing that was done precipitated this. I migrated my severely rotated Morgan from bute and banamine to No-Bute contains organically grown Devil's Claw which is supposedly good for the gastro-intestinal tract. Because I'm such a chicken I decreased the bute as I increased the Devil's Claw. It's available from Claire Norcross at www.emeraldvalleybotanical.com tel number 1-888-638-8262. Hopes this helps someone else Gerry Nichols If you keep on trimming correctly keeping the horse moving with 24 hour turn-out in a herd and hand-walking if needed you should not need this sort of thing too long. You are a life saver and I am so glad I did this method first instead of wasting years on western medicine and fancy shoeing. But I bet you saw her walk out longer-strided and smoother immediately-this is something that will remain with the trim with the exception of ouchy abscessing periods Start soaking her feet daily and keep it up. If she gets real sore especially if it suddenly comes up on one side you probably have an abscess and long soaks in water and apple cider vinegar will draw it out faster. I wanted my project to help her With the help of your web site we now have hope We modified her diet helped her lose weight added magnesium supplements and of course started the Strasser trim. Our vet says with the work we have done we have stabilized her laminitis I'm sure we will be in contact again with many questions and such as we progress with Dusty's treatment for this will be an ongoing process. While at a shareholder's meeting at Abbott Laboratories I saw photos of mouse stomachs-normal and after taking aspirin on an empty stomach-which were scary images to say the least Constant walking will do a better job of keeping heat and soreness down without the bad side effects of drugs. No Do not confine her to a stall at night Laying down for hours will allow pain and inflammation to increase and circulation to be reduced. Even overnight stalling is not OK. Just because it is natural for us to lie down for 8 hours does not mean it is natural for a horse. Jan Medicines and supplements are really less important than the mechanical approach-frequent correct trims and constant movement. Am passing it on to all my horse friends Jan Gretchen Fathauer's reply-If you are going to try to do the trim but want to stick with stall confinement and continued drug use it will not work. If another horse is not with her she at least needs her hay to be put in different locations to motivate her to move more often and more frequent hand walking. during the treatment of contracted hooves several aspects must be considered many of which are similar to the transition from shod to barefoot already discussed earlier. These include discomfort when circulation first returns to the hoof due to a restored hoof mechanism like numb fingers from cold warming up again sensitivity to point pressure since the sole must be kept fairly thin to facilitate un-contraction pain from the deformed lateral cartilages straightening out some degree of inflammation increased circulation necessary for normal healing and an accompanying sensitivity to concussion etc. It must also be understood that movement on whatever ground the horse can tolerate is vital to the reversal of contraction especially during times of inflammation. If natural living conditions are not possible an attempt to open a contracted hoof should not be made. These abscesses are not the result of puncture wounds or infections but rather are the body's natural way of removing dead tissue or tissue damaged beyond repair. Movement is vital for an abscess to exit as quickly as possible and to prevent swelling of the lower leg. She then mentions soaking and poultices to speed drawing out abscesses Coffin bone deformation often present if the hoof was contracted.for a long time.presents a very difficult and long-term rehabilitation requiring up to 2 years until the hoof is completely restored to its normal shape. Laminitis coffin bone rotation and or protrusion may be expected if the contraction is severe and has been present for a long time if the corium of the entire wall had had insufficient curiculation for a long time and the coffin bone suspension is greatly deteriorated. The time factor in reversing contraction is extremely unpredictable taking just weeks or many months If the owner is not willing to give the horse natural living conditions and reasonable time in which to heal reversing contraction should not be attempted. If you have problems with thrush chances are you have recessed frogs buried between high heels and bars. Another thought Jaime Jackson has had-it is possible that farrier's tools that have not been disinfected in between horses could spread infection too. One reason ponies are more founder-prone is that they evolved in conditions where vegatation was sparse naturally lean diet and the terrain was hard and rocky. After reading your article I have realized how dangerous it can be to treat your horses like a child and thinking they need more food when it's cold or keeping them in their stalls to keep them clean. I have heard of many horses having colic because their buckets were frozen over most of the time so they weren't drinking enough. As I mentioned before ponies evolved in habitats with sparse vegetation. Yolanda Moyer yolandamoyer@aol.com Date 3 11 00 Time 8 52 05 AM Remote User Comments. When Max was bad I felt an obvious decrease in heat right after hand walking him and soreness worked out. All the movement he is getting is keeping him feeling better. So any walking will help but it took 2 of us to move her tonight after the gelding ran her soo hard and all her muscles were contracting. Strasser could certainly use some contributions to further her work. Pepcid and tagament help reduce the likelihood of stomach irritation when using bute banamine and aspirin. Do you think the heels can be lowered so much as to cause the flexor tendon to cause additional rotation That is a popular idea but you need to look at the increased leverage on the tendon each time a high under-run heel sinks down momentarily with each step. Also a note for other readers when buying your nippers and files remember you get what you pay for-good equipment make the task much easier and you do a better job. 20 nippers are only useful for building rehab projects when you pull finishing nails through the back of woodwork you are have pulled off and are going to refinish and reuse. Some people are using those little Dremel grinders from the hardware store-using the high-speed cutter attachments for soles and bars and the chain saw sharpening attachment for sharpening hoof knives. Gretchen I originally contacted you in February and your comments and contact with Sue Syme have given me a tremendous amount of hope and support. She gets both feet soaked in cider vinegar for 10-15 minutes apiece each day and this has worked wonderfully Before I started this her feet stank and oozed pus. She has no odor at all now You can back off on the vinegar once the abscesses are cleared but daily soaks in plain water need to be kept up indefinitely if she doesn't get exposed to water any other way during the day. I have stopped the isoxyprine and she will be completely weaned off the nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory Arquel in 1 more week. I've also increased her exercise by hand walking her as frequently as I am able. To all sceptics out there-I am thrilled with the results I am seeing She was sore for about 36 hours after the initial trim my farrier did but she has steadily improved since I have decreased her pain medicine and started the walks. Her soles have a long way to go because she is missing sole in the toe areas of both feet but I believe this will grow in if we continue our efforts to lower her heels and keep her toes short. Also anyone can e-mail me who needs support or just someone to commiserate with Also I would be glad for you to put Metreyna's story on your web site to help other people realize what great results they can see with this program. I know we have a long way to go and we're making mistakes but without your website I believe Teeny's sole would have been penetrated by the coffin bone a month ago Laura Rider DVM curlydoc@hotmail.com I believe your private email to me mentioned old sole peeling off in a layer with new sole growing in underneath. Jan Gretchen Fathauer's reply to Jan-You might consult Jaime Jackson on the pasture warfare issue. He has studied wild horse society quite a bit and is an expert horseman. Once the new social order solidifies things would probably calm down. www.amazon.com carries a great tape Liberty Training by Carolyn Resnick showing some of the neat things you can do with this. A Liberty Training session with him when you turn them out together and right before too might be better to get his mind on something other than lording it over her. Thanks for creating such an informative web page Linda Forest linda@forestassociates.net Date 3 13 00 Time 10 07 41 PM Remote User Comments. Some one said it might be Keratoma But I can't find anything on this Any ideas Thanks Jill realestate@torchlake.com Send photos to Sabine Kells or Jaime Jackson for some feedback. Hi My name is Kevin I live in Tasmania I'm a farrier self taught Have been doing farrier work for over 12 years mostly on general hacking horses and spoilt pets. Your information which I come across by accident is very relevant to what I have been trying to instill in my customers for years that shoeing has a detrimental affect on the horses'hooves as proved by your article. Regards Kevin Fairbrother from New Norfolk Tasmania 7140 email adress Date 3 17 00 Time 2 03 36 AM Remote User Comments. My 10 year old Thorobred has suffered from chronic laminitus brought on initially by fondering on grass. Fortunately my farrior and I decided against this. Christine Bartell bartell@wvi.com Date 3 21 00 Time 12 21 42 AM Remote User Comments. Jan Gretchen Fathauer's reply to Jan-While low thyroid can make a horse more likely to founder thyroid medication alone is not a magic bullet. At the heart of most founder is a lack of hoof mechanism and circulation due to inactivity and incorrect hoof shape. During those times just walking the horse a mile-AFTER a correct trim to reduce toe leverage and restore the bottoms of the coffin bones to a ground-parallel position-would have reduced this heat and stiffness because it helps clear inflammation. Gretchen Fathauer Date 3 26 00 Time 4 16 40 AM Remote User Comments. Thanks again Jan Gretchen Fathauer's reply to Jan-Is there a normal range of time before one rides a lame horse Is there a healing time or doesn't it matter. Thanks again Jan Chasing her to encourage trotting and cantering especially on concussive ground is premature. Listen to your horse-if she doesn't feel up to trotting and cantering yet don't ask for it. Gretchen Fathauer Date 3 27 00 Time 1 57 58 AM Remote User Comments. I showed this article to my boyfriend who is a Certified Master Farrier. When Danny started to trim the horse's feet he noticed a horrible abscess on the sole in the toe area. He relieved the pressure but is wondering how much abscess in the sole can be accepted with severe founder. Strasser on hoof abscesses that recently appeared in Jaime Jackson's newsletter which I certainly recommend to anyone-a great publication Dr. Strasser on hoof abscesses A hoof abscess is a purulent inflammation of the corium where the pressure produced by the accumulation of pus between the corium and the hoof causes the horse great pain and leads to pronounced lameness. According to conventional educated opinion a hoof abscess occurs when the horse has pierced the sole with a foreign object-that is the abscess occurs through infection from the outside. Hoof abscesses however only very rarely arise due to external infecting agents. More commonly the following occurs Corium or lateral cartilage areas which have been compressed for a long time die off. often is the result of contracted feet and the tip of a tilted coffin bone pressing on the toe area sole corium After circulation is returned to these areas the dead pieces of tissue are removed from the living tissue and carried to the outside by pus since the dead pieces of tissue cannot be transported away through the microscopically small blood vessels in the corrium. THIS PROCESS IS VERY COMMON IN THE TRANSITION FROM SHOD HOOF TO BAREFOOT. We are only talking 10-degree rotation That the abscesses have already blown is progress. Do not be alarmed that the coronet band seems to have separated because an abscess exited through it. Achieving a hairline slope of as close as possible to 30 degrees is an outward indication of the bottom of the coffin bone being ground-parallel. When I next edit the page I will include an X-ray of a wild horse's foot showing that having the bottoms of the coffin bones ground-parallel is indeed natural not the high-heeled scenarios that are currently in vogue. Chrissie Vancouver Island Canada26-3-00 pandcnolan@pacificcoast.net Date 3 27 00 Time 11 27 46 PM Remote User Comments. Have done a few trims in the past 4 weeks mare couldn't walk for a couple weeks without hopping This weekend has been walking and trotting and standing on concrete on her own choice. I have a 12-yr-old QH gelding that was diagnosed with laminitis about a year and a half ago. We just watched him closely did a lot of hand walking foot soaking and hoof trimming we were lowering the heels and shortening the toes so I guess we were on the right track He is completely sound today he has been since the inital flare-up and I hope he will remain so. What I do not like about your current situation is that he is not getting enough turnout and movement and herd life. The farrier is concerned because there is still separation on the RF and right now the toe of the LF would also probably be bruised He is a very spirited horse for being older. I hope to be able to move him eventually to a different kind of facility where he can be turned out with other horses all day but for now maybe you can give me some guidance about the turnout situation and what other exercise program you would recommend at this stage. Time 10 03 04 AM Remote User Comments. Hello Gretchen Last fall I took my daughter's horse's shoes off. I had no information such as your site or the Lifetime of Soundness book. The heels are low because they wore down over the winter but the toe is a bit long my farrier said it couldn't be shorter than that because of the dish. As we progress with the barefoot trim will this dish probably grow out Eventually it should. Could the dish have been caused by new stronger wall growing in above the old weaker hoof wall The dish is caused by the weakened laminae nearer the ground not being able to hold the toe wall close to the bone. I mean give up the show season till the barefoot trim could strengthen the hoof Yikes my daughter wouldn't like that option. If her own horses have these problems whatever are they teaching her at the Agricultural College She is going to try to arrange for a clinic at the college with Sabine Kells. I am going to put into practise the trimming methods I have seen here especially on my foundered mare. Thanks for a great site Maureen mht@symaptico.ca Date 3 30 00 Time 1 59 31 AM Remote User Comments. Maureen Jack Gretchen Fathauer's reply-It's never too late I substantially changed Max's hairline slope in his late 20's. If people are interested the archives are open to the public but a person must join to post comments or ask questions. my old address is dead my new address is bethpony@yahoo.com I have tried sending numerous emails to your aol.com address but they are sent back. Derryl Keels vthomp5699@iwon.com Date 4 13 00 Time 11 42 35 AM Remote User Comments. WOW Superb As the new owner of a previously foundered pony I'm inspired to achieve a beautiful barefooted Shetland. We are receiving several drafts soon that will also benefit from all the fantastic information I have been reading for 5 hours now I'm trying to convince a best friend that getting rid of her newly foundered horse due to financial burdens and time consuming treatments may not be the way to go. All Equine Lover's and Owners should at least read your information which I believe is the most logical and detailed information on Laminitis and treating it that I have ever found before deciding to put down sell or dispose of a Laminitic Equine. Thanks so much for opening my eyes to this approach to manage correct and prevent Laminitis from ruining otherwise healthy and pain-free Equines Sincerely Sara Stevens Leasburg Missouri shf@stevenshobbyfarm.com www.StevensHobbyFarm.com Date 4 15 00 Time 9 18 17 AM Remote User Comments. He is even tolerating small amounts of gravel with no ouchiness or bruising. The information on this site has been unbelievable You have done a fantastic job of presenting vast amounts of information. I couldn't confirm a space today since the office was closed but I will hopefully know by tomorrow. Although he at 9 yrs old had never been lame or displayed any clinical symptoms of problems I had his hind shoes removed last October after reading the books and this site. This was much to the dismay of my trainer and farrier who both said he couldn't go and stay in dressage work barefoot but who also couldn't supply accurate answers as to why they felt this way. If you have time in reading your responses posted above I have the following questions. QUESTION 1 You responded with this post to someone If you vet would just study X-rays and hoof cross-sections he would see how illogical heel wedges are for foundered horses. Further horses trimmed or shod very stumpy are short-strided rough-gaited and clumsy. Does this sound typical if you shorten the toe Or even possible In conjunction with this I feel that under saddle the horse has a shorter stride and trips more often than before I started requesting the farrier to change what he was doing. Can you comment on how you would apply this concept to a shod horse showing no clinical symptoms but who lives in a commercial boarding situation where stall confinement 12 hrs a day is typical. I wish more people at the barn where I board would be interested in reading it so we could all discuss it and learn together but perhaps the biggest problem in reaching optimal horse health isn't the horse it's the humans. Thanks for everything Mary marys@aeseducation.com Gretchen Fathauer's reply to Mary Your farrier is making matters worse by shortening the toe and raising the toe angle and heels. Backing up the profile will also effectively shorten the toe without the ill effects of taking sole horn out of the moonsickle area of the toe. I have known confined barefoot horses who do handle being barefoot reasonably well but they did not have the heel-spreading process being agressively pursued. I know everyone will tell you if it ain't broke why fix it Well because if you continue as you are now the horse WILL have trouble later either navicular or founder. Gretchen Fathauer Date 4 27 00 Time 1 05 03 AM Remote User Comments. Bianca Gaugler gauglerk@aol.com Date 4 27 00 Time 2 47 29 AM Remote User Comments. Charles Cloud cloud@ipa.net Gretchen Fathauer's reply-I would dry-lot him until things calm down and then gradually re-introduce him to new grass-half hour for a few days then an hour then a little longer etc. Would ice water help relieve the swelling What other type of prevention can I use my e-mail address is Date 5 7 00 Time 3 09 41 AM Remote User Comments. old Appaloosa gelding Marvin has Cushing's disease which makes horses more susceptable to founder and related hoof problems. Marvin foundered last year and while the founder is not that severe he has had multiple abscesses ever since. Tecumseh MI 49286 rmgoldy@lni.net Date 5 8 00 Time 12 13 03 AM Remote User Comments. My email is equinedriven@aol.com Ive been perusing your website.I'm a writer and I'm doing an article on Founder Laminitis Im going to link your page for the article Thanks so much for this info.I emailed Tristate months ago about the Strasser method to let them know about it. He's a happy and healthy guy thanks to New Bolten's Rob Sigafoos and Sabre Sneaker.and the Strasser method Date 5 8 00 Time 8 25 24 PM Remote User Comments. Thanks for your efforts to put this site together Kris Dalton dalton@theriver.com Date 5 8 00 Time 10 14 54 PM Remote User Comments. Farrier not much help-insists on doing a 4-point trim but it looks awfully violent at the corners at least to me. A couple of questions for the acute phase of probably spring grass laminitis founder How much charcoal when first discovered Continue for how long Average dose is 300 ml. Can you suggest amounts for dolomite DMG Epsom salts for the duration And how do you get the Epsoom salts down em Any other recommendations for the acute phase not highlighted in the books or this website Many blessings on you and yours for this fabulous site. I have been sobbing uncontrollably for days since I found you quite by accident miracle Linda e-mail address Date 5 10 00 Time 1 18 08 AM Remote User Comments. Hope to see more on other hoof-related problems and even some dynamics of motion stringhalt shivering etc Grant Store No I am going to concentrate on chronic laminitis. Thank you for putting out this information for us horse lovers Ann Hill ponyexpress@pdq.net Date 5 11 00 Time 7 47 07 AM Remote User Comments. I was wondering if we needed to keep her locked in a small yard and if I did get her shod wouldn't it hurt her feet more Also my vet told me that laminitis can be brought on by something as small as having a cold drink of water to something like an infected wound. thank you Emma Beaufoy emma lee161@hotmail.com Date 5 11 00 Time 6 10 13 PM Remote User Comments. Gretchen Fathauer Date 5 12 00 Time 2 38 16 AM Remote User Comments. light excercise with him I always thought that he took to much heel off of the horse but he started looking and feeling so good after the first 2 months I didn't say anything It's been a year and his shoeings are about 5 weeks apart he is wearing normal shoes a lean and mean 784 lbs and we just finished our first competative ride of 21miles this past weekend whereas he is find I'm still recovering. Rob Lewis montyrebel@aol.com Gretchen Fathauer's reply to Rob-Glad your farrier stuck by his guns on low heels You are reaping the rewards now. Using Horsneakers would be a good way to do long rides with full protection while having the benefits of barefootedness the rest of the imte. What is the address for the website I seek info for research on laminitis for a speech in my highschool English class Please reply to me at jdkool 99@Yahoo.com Gretchen Fathauer's reply-http members.screenz.com gretchenfathauer Dude Scroll down to the bottom of the page Date 5 18 00 Time 2 24 22 AM Remote User Comments. great site HEART BAR RANCH REINING PERFORMANCE HORSES 3768 TRAIL RD ANDERSON SC 29621 EMAIL hartbar@bellsouth.net Date 5 18 00 Time 2 27 33 AM Remote User Comments. great site HEART BAR RANCH REINING PERFORMANCE HORSES 3768 TRAIL RD ANDERSON SC 29621 EMAIL hartbar@bellsouth.net Date 5 19 00 Time 9 57 52 AM Remote User Comments. Hello I cannot tell you how inspired and hopeful I am after thoroughly and avidly reading your series of articles. I had given up hope for my mare who I regularly introduce as my heartache She started foundering with her previous owner breeder after prolapsing. My friend essentially gave her to me because she was too worried to try breeding her again and I think she also felt she felt she could not give her the attention she deserved she is a lovely mare sweet eager to please a pleasure to ride Since living with me for the past 3 years although I have been very dilligent in watching her diet and for possible founder causes she has foundered over and over again. Recently I have had to change vets because my previous vet was cutting down the distance that he was willing to cover from his clinic. In switching I managed to find a clinic that is providing some radical services including adding a separate equine dentistry practice their studies have found amazing reductions in colics by practicing real dentistry on horses instead of the usual floating I also lucked into a younger vet from the clinic who had relatively recently graduated from veterinary college where they had been doing research on the usage of nitroglicerine in founder cases. He did not sound very hopeful however he suggested that all I could do with the founder episodes happening more often was try to reduce the pain and when it got to be too much I would have to put my mare down. I was worried about the possible side-effects of using nitroglicerine and pain relievers and started doing my own research on the web when I came across your articles. This could be that I am already practicing a relatively natural existence with all of my horses I firmly believe in pasture living over stable living. I felt however that this really presented a dichotomy in attempting to treat my foundering horse believing that grass clover especially is a big contributor to founder. I have noted various things in your articles such as magensium levels that are making me take better stock of my horse-keeping habits and I have a list of things that I will check from a dietary perspective. The trimming practices are something completely new to me I have always been taught that shoeing was a necessity for founders. I am hopeful because both my new vet and my current farrier are young and very interested in trying new things. After many years of watching many farriers and asking questions of them so as to learn I decided to try trimming hooves. I credit the farriers who took the time to let me watch and answer my questions all of these years Cappy rest in peace Bernard Pellatier Emmit Stevens and James Fireball Witherspoon. Anderson Seffner Florida email margyminis@aol.com Date 5 24 00 Time 12 14 30 AM Remote User Comments. Thank you Carolyn email aandchinton@prodigy.net Date 5 28 00 Time 8 46 49 AM Remote User Comments. Help Debbie Collins BreezyD23@aol.com Date 5 31 00 Time 7 31 42 AM Remote User Comments. Is it and why is it Thank you boomer@netwurx.net During an acute laminitis attack walking or standing in cool soft mud can be comforting and help reduce inflammation. FOUR STAR MINIMUM Date 6 2 00 Time 3 46 28 AM Remote User Comments. Hi Gretchen thankfully I'm not in any immediate need of the valuable information you have gathered on your site I've got it boomarked this is just a social visit. Further the soles need to be thinner the bars and heels lowered a lot the quarters scooped and opening cuts made to encourage more heel spreading rapidly. Deanna and Mystery criverbendfarm@hotmail.com Abscessing IS part of the healing process. Am currently treating my horse for chronic laminitis by conventional methods.resection of both hooves padidng and wrapping confinement. Am hoping to convince both the veterinarian and farrier of your methods. Would greatly appreciate your help Christy Smith piedogs@earthlink.net Jaime Jackson's office can refer you to more people 870-743-4603. Supplements somewhat depend on if the forage and hay you are feeding are from nutrient-deficient soil. With limited finances I have been devastated watching the course that founder follows. Vet and farrier assistance has not been satisfactory in my experience. Thank you Mary Berning mberning@mediaone.net You don't need a lot of money to treat founder if you are willing and able to do the trimming and hand walking and soaking that is necessary. I have just started your program and I will keep you posted as to Patton's progress. Thanks Kathy Lee George Henryetta Oklahoma Slueth02@aol.com Call Martha Olivo at 970-260-8474 and leave a message if no answer. Her immediate clinic schedule June 10-Santa Fe NM-contact Margaret Soriero 505-986-8658. It is their charcoal treatment in the first aid section called Toxi-Ban. Have tried the heartbars reverse shoes and glue ons plus glue-ons with pad inserts. OF MY HORSE BEING FOUNDERED AND MANY PEOPLE TELLING TO PUT MY HORSE DOWN I HAVE FOUND THIS WEB PAGE. I HAVE BEEN WORKING ON MY HORSE MYSELF BUT I WILL TRY EVEN MORE TO FINALLY GET IT LIKE YOU HAVE IT. I am looking for any info on treating navicular syndrome I may also be dealing with mild chronic founder altho no one is sure despite the usual clinical work-up. Being stuck in Arizona we have no access to anyone trained in the Strasser or Jackson methods. I really enjoyed the detailed anatomical explanations for a condition I was not really familiar with yet It seems like a very sound and practical treatment program. Frank Orza horsneaker@theriver.com Phone 520-455-5164 Frank is a farrier who invented and makes Horsneakers a custom-made horse boot made from molds of your horse's feet. Martha Olivo will be giving two AZ clinics as well July 29-Phoenix AZ-contact Susan Taylor 480-671-7981 September 30-Phoenix AZ-contact either Susan Taylor 480-671-7981 or Beverly Winan 480-835-5538 Date 6 15 00 Time 3 17 35 AM Remote User Comments. Dear Gretchen I recently found your website in my continuing search for a local farrier to help me with hoof care for my two horses and two ponies. I have believe that is better to leave a horse barefoot with frequent trims rather than shoeing and waiting longer periods for trims. I would very much appreciate any references for informed individuals close to Eugene Oregon who may be albe to offer some guidance. Dear Gretchen I recently found your website in my continuing search for a local farrier to help me with hoof care for my two horses and two ponies. trims rather than shoeing and waiting longer periods for trims. I have a new farrier comming on Saturday to remove his shoes and help me with some trimming. He is not familiar with Dr.Stasser's trim method but I will see if he is willing to work with me using this method. I would very much appreciate any references for informed individuals close to Eugene Oregon who may be albe to offer some guidance. I came home with Sabine's instructions from the pictures I took and the excellent practice we received on the cadaver feet. My farrier and I changed a few things we were doing incorrectly the biggest was not removing enough bar and scooping the sole out enough. The improvement in my gelding's movement is dramatic he trotted into the barn for dinner tonite. My vet is impressed with not only my gelding's progress but he has another client who has been doing photo consults with Sabine and her horse that has been unrideable for three years is starting to be ridden lightly in boots. He told me when I returned my horse's xrays after the clinic that he has convinced two more of his clients to NOT shoe their foundered Cushing's afflicted horses but to go the Strasser route. Dawn Wagstaff kingdom@izzy.net Date 6 17 00 Time 2 01 20 PM Remote User Comments. I have started this list because the existing barefootedhorse list has been deteriorating. Click here to subscribe to naturalhorsetrim This list is a positive support group for horse owners interested in high peformance barefooted horses based on the wild horse model including Jaime Jackson's wild horse studies and in rehabilitating horses using the methods of Dr. Her method is also valuable for sound horses because it promotes longevity and health as well as optimum movement and sure-footedness. We also believe that barefootedness can be a superior high-performance option after correctly conditioning and managing the transition to barefootedness which may involve the temporary use of removable hoof boots. This is an option that we believe is better than shoeing because boots can be used only when needed they allow more hoof mechanism and the horse can enjoy all the benefits of being barefooted the rest of the time. Posts will be confined to rehabilitating horses using holistic and barefooted methods and to high performance barefooted issues. Gretchen Fathauer Moderator naturalhorsetrim Date 6 19 00 Time 10 40 46 AM Remote User Comments. Strasser is interested in travelling to Australia to give a clinic or two. Anyone living in Australia who is interested in attending or in organizing a clinic please let me know gretchenfathauer@prodigy.net Date 6 21 00 Time 2 29 54 AM Remote User Comments. I must admit I was not familiar with treating founder so through a friend I contacted a shoer who does orthopedic shoeing and thought my or should I say Sweetie Pies troubles would soon be over. Gretchen Fathauer Date 6 21 00 Time 6 27 28 AM Remote User Comments. Thanks Again Janet shylow@iland.net Date 6 25 00 Time 4 29 02 AM Remote User Comments. Excellent information thank you Lynn bystrom@spacestar.net Date 6 26 00 Time 5 12 46 AM Remote User Comments. Chimino had his shoes only wears front immediately removed and has been trimmed and the ferrier is due out in a week or so she recently checked him along with the vet and they didn't feel he was ready for his next trim. I have already purchased the grazing muzzle which he has been getting some practice using when I take him out. Very very good Lots of help here Linsey McLean vitamail@earthlink.net Date 7 1 00 Time 12 52 58 AM Remote User Comments. Sincerely Paul Chelle Mangum PCMangum@msn.com Date 7 6 00 Time 7 14 48 AM Remote User Comments. I know absolutely nothing about horses but a very good friend of mine owns a horse and I ran into him today looking extremely depressed. He is in such personal distress that I decided to look it up on the internet and your site is so well-organized that I actually think I understand how that poor creature must be suffering I mean the horse. JoAnne Cesare email joannecesare@aol.com Some people who has succesfully applied the method have. Thank you Yvonne Camtico@aol.com Date 7 25 00 Time 7 43 20 AM Remote User Comments. Are there any other causes of Founder besides diet Thanks Kathy in Annapolis Maryland katwms1@aol.com Grass is not the cause of founder. Use a Dremel carving tool available at hardware stores everywhere. If you want a REAL project come work on my draft mule's massive hooves That the hairlines are ground-parallel is awful. Walking him on blacktop or some other firm ground-AFTER his hairlines are 30 degrees etc.can help spread his heels and achieve hoof mechanism. Back to home page Article in sections with thumbnail photos for fastest. downloads 1 8 15 2 9 16 3 10 17 4 11 18 5 12 19 6 13 20 7 14 21 Article in sections with full-sized photos for print-outs 1 8 15 2 9 16 3 10 17 4 11 18 5 12 19 6 13 20 7 14 21 To Strasser case studies-thumbnail photos for faster. downloads To Strasser case studies-large photos Please sign my guest book Photos of my pets My farm Click here to subscribe to naturalhorsetrim I strictly moderate this listserv to weed out fluff. Some mixed grass and clover-some mixed grass alfalfa clover and heavier on timothy. 2 each first cutting 2.50 second cutting picked up at my farm. Frustrated not being able to find anything but straight alfalfa Call me at 740-674-4492. Copyright by Gretchen Fathauer 2000.
      [Contents]
    • Related Founder/Laminitis Links - http://www.montana-art.com/links.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Related Founder Laminitis Links. Thank You Page Please visit this page to see businesses that have donated goods and services to help save Kate. Kate's Team More about the owner veterinarian and farrier that are working together to rehabilitate Kate. Owner's Journal This journal uses photos and text to cover the daily ups and downs of caring for a chronically foundered horse. Kate's X-Rays Periodic radiographs are being taken of Kate's hooves Kate's Shoes Some photos of the shoes Joe designed for Kate. What is Meant by the Term Foundering hopeforsoundness.com Gene Ovnicek oshaproducts.com Treating Founder Chronic Laminitis Without Horseshoes www.horseshoes.com laminitis page Explaining Laminitis and its Prevention-a book Northwest Laminitis Center Hoofcare and Lameness Magazine 1999 Bluegrass Laminitis Symposium A Brief Elementary Introduction to Laminitis Rural Heritage.Com Excellent website go to the blacksmith section and you can email questions to a farrier. K2Equine Supply The Grazing Muzzle is recommended and used by many veterinarians to prevent problems caused by overeating such as laminitis founder and colic. If you are unable to keep your horse confined or want him or her to be able to stay with the herd this is a great solution Horse hoof repair by Rusty's Equine Hoof Repair Hoof repair quartercracks hoof wall separations hoof wall abscess hoof bar cracks hoof wall disease hoof wall resection hoof wall reconstruction Please visit.
      [Contents]
    • HBOC'99: Proceedings - New Horizons in Therapeutic Shoeing and Hoof Care - http://www.agric.gov.ab.ca/livestock/horses/hbo9906.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: HBOC'99 Proceedings New Horizons in Therapeutic Shoeing and Hoof Care New Horizons in Therapeutic Shoeing and Hoof Care. Rod Sigafoos Contents. So now what Morphologic morphometric hoof balance Dorsal-palmer plane An angular dilemma M M balance M-L Dynamic balance M L Horseshoeing and Science Hoof Balance a Modern Approach Running shoes for what. Attaching the shoes Shoe augmentation References Introduction Over the last few decades new technology has brought remarkable advances to many industries. It is hard to imaging engaging in a sport today without the benefit of advanced plastics and other materials that make competition safer easier and more enjoyable. Prior to 1954 when New Balance R introduced the modern running shoe to the Boston Marathon the state of the art for this race was the leather soled bowling shoe. foam polyurethane graphite and many others have dramatically reduced the number of foot injuries and shortened racing times. Our methods for trimming and shoeing the horse were primarily anecdotal with trial and error being the state of the art for most lameness therapy. For many of the equine sports steel has been replaced with lighter materials such as aluminum and titanium. The myriad variety of shoe designs has virtually eliminated the need for the handmade forged horseshoe. Advanced polymers that have become the hallmark of the human athletic industry are now becoming more and more common place on the horse's hoof. Why all the fuss Trimming and shoeing the horse's hoof has always been a controversial subject often pitting owners trainers farriers and veterinarians against one another. But why all the fuss How can something so seemingly simple something that has been done for many hundreds of years create such disagreement among professionals How can you as a perhaps somewhat frustrated horse owner assess the way your horse has been trimmed and shod Before we ever get to the point of applying the shoe to the hoof we need to trim the excess growth from the hoof wall. If this is the case we should be able to trim an even amount of toe and heel from the hoof or trim the same amount of hoof from one side of the foot or the other Figure 2 However and this is the important part it is also possible to preferentially trim more from one area such as the toe or the heels or one side of the hoof than another. Changing the orientation of the coffin bone relative to the ground is referred to as changing the balance Figure 3 Balance relative to the horse's hoof is determined in two planes the front to back usually called dorsal to palmar abbreviated DP and side to side medial to lateral abbreviated ML orientation of the horse's hoof. raising or lowering the heels the dorsal palmar DP balance is changed. If the farrier trims more off of the inside of the hoof than the outside or vice versa the balance has been changed in the medial lateral ML plane Figure 4 If the farrier trims a consistent thickness of hoof wall off of the hoof from heel to heel the balance has not been changed in either the DP plane or the ML plane. However due to uneven hoof growth normal hoof wear lameness or disease or a variety of other factors it may be necessary for the farrier to change the hoof balance in either the ML or DP plane. A bit of biomechanics What happens when a farrier changes the hoof balance in the ML or DP plane What structures are affected when the toe is shortened and the measured hoof angle is raised What happens when the hoof is trimmed lower on one side than the other Probably one of the most profound and least disputed effects of changing the balance on a horse occurs on the Deep Digital Flexor Tendon abbreviated DDFT when the hoof is trimmed preferentially in the DP plane Figure 5 This tendon shown in purple attaches from the groups of the flexor muscles on the upper leg and extends down the leg to attach to the underneath side of the coffin bone PIII Trimming more hoof wall from the toe than the heel will move the end of the coffin bone downwards effectively shortening the distance from the tendon's attachment on the coffin bone to the muscle. If we view the horse from the side while he is walking we may see that he sets his hoof down flat or toe first or perhaps heel first Figure 7 It has been shown that most horses will set their feet down flat or heel first with very few setting their feet down toe first 1 However as we decrease the hoof angle we increase the tendency for horses to set their feet down toe first. For example if a farrier trimmed the medial side of the foot shorter than the lateral side the horse may start to set the lateral side down first if we watched the horse walk coming toward us Figure 9 This concept is frequently employed when it is necessary to return a horse to a flat strike pattern if the horse has begun setting the foot down unevenly in the medial to lateral plane. There is an old adage that states that a horse's hoof turns towards length This means that if a hoof is shortened on one side say the medial side for example the hoof will turn toward the longer side the medial side This concept is frequently used when attempting to correct a foal that is toed in or out. So now what Any time a farrier trims a horse's hoof she is faced with the question Do I change the balance The farrier must always decide Do I take more off the heel than toe or more off the toe than heel or trim the foot evenly Do I trim more off the lateral side or more of the medial side or trim the foot evenly Hoof balance in both the medial to lateral plane and the dorsal palmar plane can be assessed in two methods. Morphologic refers to the subjective evaluation of the shape of the hoof and limb whereas morphometric refers to the precise measurement of these structures. Using this method we usually evaluate the symmetry of the hoof or compare symmetry between two hooves e.g. Evaluation of hoof balance using this method usually involves the assessment of the symmetry of the hoof. There are a number of methods or parameters we can use to evaluate the symmetry. The following are some examples of parameters that are frequently used to determine morphologic morphometric hoof balance in the horse in both the DP and the ML planes. Although it is very difficult to get an accurate measurement of a horse's hoof angle the average approximate angle of the front foot ranges from 50 to 55 degrees. Most people agree that as a rule the hoof should be trimmed so that the front of the foot is parallel to the front of the pastern Figure 10 Notice that if we trim more foot from the toe than the heel of the hoof or vice versa the front of the hoof is no longer parallel to the pastern. The angle of the sole and the toe wall is increased and the pastern rotates backward Figure11 An angular dilemma. We have mentioned earlier that preferentially trimming more hoof wall from the toe of the hoof will increase the measured hoof angle measured using a hoof gage decrease the stress on the DDFT and increase the tendency for the horse's hoof to contact the ground heel first. But how accurately can we measure the toe angle Even more importantly is it possible to change the angle of the hoof without changing the position of PIII changing the stress on the coffin bone or changing the way the hoof contacts the ground The answer is of course that it is quite simple to change the measured hoof angle without affecting the other aspects of the hoof. One simply has to trim off the front of the hoof wall Figure 12 We can see that thinning the lower section of the hoof wall at the toe will significantly change the measured hoof angle without changing the orientation of the coffin bone. It is important therefore to differentiate between the measured hoof angle and the angular position of the coffin bone when discussing hoof balance in the DP plane. The various methods that have been described and there are many to determine hoof balance are referred to as hoof balance parameters These parameters usually presume that symmetry of the hoof wall is normal and ideal. They include but are in no way limited to the following Comparing the lengths of the medial and lateral heels The foot would be considered asymmetrical and therefore unbalanced if one heel was longer than the other was. Comparing the weight-bearing plane of the hoof relative to the long axis of the cannon bone With the leg held in the flexed position one can sight down the cannon bone and observe if the weight-bearing plane of the hoof intersects the long axis of the cannon bone. Observing the position of the coronet relative to the ground when the horse is standing with the foot flat on the ground This observation is made when observing the horse from the front. The foot would be considered asymmetrical and therefore unbalanced if the coronet was not parallel to the ground. Bisecting the hoof wall The hoof would be considered asymmetrical and therefore unbalanced if the hoof could not be bisected relative to an imaginary line drawn through the frog. Notice that distance a is longer than distance b Dynamic balance M L The second method we have of balancing the hoof involves evaluating the movement of the animal. We can observe the way the foot contacts the ground the strike pattern the way the foot is placed under the leg the way the hoof breaks over when it is lifted from the ground along with many other aspects of the movement Figure 13 Table 1 shows some of the different types of morphologic morphometric and dynamic balance techniques. Dorsal palmar Toe pastern alignment Strike pattern flat toe first heel first Medial lateral Heel length Strike pattern flat lateral side first medial side first Medial lateral MCIII Sole intersection 90 Break over direction Medial lateral Coronet relative to the ground Foot placement relative to the ground. Medial lateral Bisecting the hoof sole Medial or lateral swing phase deviation winging or paddling Medial lateral Heel position in ventral plane Rotation of hoof at the end of the stance phase. Unfortunately in many cases one needs to decide between using a morphologic morphometric balance method or a dynamic method to balance a hoof. For example a horse may have a symmetrical hoof but sets the hoof down on the outside first referred to as a lateral strike pattern With this horse one would have to decide whether it is more important to have a symmetrical hoof and allow the horse to continue to land on the outside of the foot or to trim the hoof asymmetrically i.e. Horses with marked dynamic asymmetry however will have a greater tendency toward lameness problems of other kinds. In general one usually tries to find the best compromise between hoof symmetry and dynamic symmetry for any individual animal. Is there any scientific quantifiable way to determine hoof balance in horses Most people define scientific within the context of the scientific method This means that in order to prove an idea one has to meet two requirements. Second the results of this study have to be repeatable by others knowledgeable in the field. Most of the techniques that are used to balance the hoof are anecdotal they are based on personal observations with out the benefit of any type of scientific control. In the 1700's one of the more common methods for treating illness from the common cold to tuberculosis was blood letting This practice came from the belief that the illness was related to bad blood Removing some quantity of this affected blood would improve the health of the treated individual. those who would have improved without treatment in any case simply was held to prove the efficacy of the treatment. Unfortunately it is quite likely that we do not understand the basic nature of the biomechanics of horses sufficiently to be able to accurately make hoof balance determinations. Although it is important not to discount observations made by an experienced farrier or veterinarian for this type of subjective evaluation is currently the state of the art it is important to take these observations for what they are worth. As is true with any science or industry anecdotal observation eventually surrenders to controlled objective assessment. This single finding has contributed significantly to an improvement of the health and soundness of racing Thoroughbreds. Other studies have shown that break over time can only be reduced to a certain minimum value a finding very important when shoeing horses with limb interference problems 2 These are only a few of the many studies that will eventually improve the science of horseshoeing. In fact the wrought iron shoe was a substantial asset to civilizations in that it significantly improved the durability of horses and consequently the mobility of armies. Unfortunately however there are many horses that need a little more than the conventional shoe to perform to their fullest potential.Almost anyone who has been in the horse business for any period of time has had a bad experience with horseshoe nails. This may involve a mild bit of foot soreness following the shoeing or an abscess or even a catastrophic permanent lameness. In some cases an event as simple as a lost shoe can escalate into a chronic lameness problem. This malformation along with the loss of the weight-bearing support provided by the wall can result in a chronic lameness. Given the problems associated with the nails clearly a better approach is needed to attach shoes to the horse's hoof. Work done at the University of Pennsylvania's Applied Polymer Research Laboratory has produced an effective glue-on shoe that can be used successfully with all types of competitive horses. One shoe called the Series One is a conventional aluminum shoe that is attached to the hoof wall using two high tech fabrics a special type of polyester and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene. The fabric is then saturated with an acrylic adhesive and is wrapped over the hoof wall somewhat like putting on a sock. In 1954 New Balance R introduced to athletes competing in the Boston Marathon the first shoe specifically designed for running. Today there is virtually no sport that does not have a specifically designed shoe available from a host of competing manufacturers. The design features of these shoes include sport-specific support design specifically tuned cushioning lightweight and soles designed specifically for the intended sport. One of the projects currently underway at the Applied Polymer Research Laboratory is to investigate the incorporation of specialized polymers into shoe designs. These include materials found in human athletic shoes such as EVA Ethylene Vinyl Acetate foams thermoplastic honeycomb core materials and viscoelastic urethanes to name a few. 1 Clayton HM Comparison of the stride of trotting horses trimmed with a normal and a broken back hoof-pastern axis. In Proceedings American Association of Equine Practitioners 33 289-298 1988 2 Clayton HM Sigafroos RD Curle Effects of three shoe types on duration of breakover in sound trotting horses. He is the head of Farrier Services at the new Boulton Center University of Pennsylvania and in this capacity provides therapeutic farriery to out-patients and hospital cases. He is also the head of the Horseshoe Research Laboratory and a pioneer in adhesive technology and hoof repair compounds. This information is maintained by Sylvia Schneider at Pondside Web Productions in conjunction with the Horse Industry Section of Alberta Agriculture. Top of Document The user of this information agrees to the terms and conditions in the copyright and disclaimer Copyright C 1999-2000 Her Majesty the Queen in the Right of Alberta.
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    • THE WARMBLOOD HORSE - HOOF CARE FORUM - http://www.warmbloods.net/VirtualServers/warmbloods/hoofcaredisc9_toc.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: THE WARMBLOOD HORSE HOOF CARE FORUM. Hoof Care Home Contents Search Post CONTENTS. hot or cold stonee 3 15 99 SAND CRACK PROBLEM FIONA 3 3 99 Re SAND CRACK PROBLEM Cris 3 7 99 Re SAND CRACK PROBLEM 3 6 99 Farrier Discussion Sites Laura Whitford 2 26 99 Re Farrier Discussion Sites. Try Horseadvice.com NM Jenninfer 3 20 99 contracted heels randy 2 10 99 German Hoofcare Forum Cheval Web Service 1 23 99 Angles for shoeing feet hind fore Karen Stefonick 1 14 99 Re Angles for shoeing feet hind fore student 3 4 99 Next day lameness Elaine 1 5 99 Re Next day lameness student 3 4 99 white line disease farrier science clinic@fuse.net 1 3 99 Re white line disease rschilds@tsixroads.com 2 23 99 Re white line disease peachy9853@aol.com 2 22 99 white line disease farrier science clinic@fuse.net 12 28 98 Re white line disease rschilds@tsixroads.com 2 23 99 Re white line disease Jim D Smith Lindale TX 75771 12812 cr499 2 11 99 white line disease farrier science clinic 12 28 98 Article 60 12 6 98 Horseshoes Holly 11 20 98 hoof problems 11 9 98 Re hoof problems 12 6 98 Re hoof problems 11 16 98 Re hoof problems 11 11 98 Re hoof problems 11 9 98 Re hoof problems 3 11 99 nasty cut JD 11 2 98 Help for your cuts Valerie 11 26 98 Re nasty cut christy 11 5 98 Re nasty cut JD 11 6 98 Re nasty cut Mia 11 2 98 Re nasty cut JD 11 2 98 nasty cut JD 11 2 98 yucky cut JD 11 2 98 Re yucky cut fiona 3 3 99 Re yucky cut fiona 3 3 99 I need as much info on White line diease as I can Mia 10 26 98 Re I need as much info on White line diease as I can Strider 12 20 98 Re I need as much info on White line diease as I can Yonoson F. afarrier from New York 1 26 99 picking feet Nicki 10 3 98 Re picking feet fee 3 4 99 Re picking feet Kristi 11 11 98 Infrmation on wb-sportshorse list Celia Clarke 9 23 98 Bruised Coffin Bone Deborah 7 4 98 Re Bruised Coffin Bone 12 1 98 Re Bruised Coffin Bone 12 1 98 Re Bruised Coffin Bone 12 1 98 also TG 6 26 98 Wear on Toe hana 6 25 98 Re Wear on Toe TG 6 26 98 Thrush deep in foot Deborah 6 15 98 Re Thrush deep in foot karen taylor 3 14 99 Re Thrush deep in foot karen taylor 3 14 99 Re Thrush deep in foot 12 6 98 low heel can it be corrected Lauren 6 9 98 Re low heel can it be corrected 12 27 98 Re low heel can it be corrected 12 27 98 Re low heel can it be corrected sbuchner@interacs.com 6 13 98 Re low heel can it be corrected CC 6 11 98 Should I remove his shoes GM 5 6 98 Re Should I remove his shoes sbuchner@interacs 6 13 98 White line Disease rr 5 6 98 Re White line Disease sbuchner@interacs.com 6 13 98 Re White line Disease farrier science clinic@fuse.net. sbuchner@interacs 6 13 98 Soaking foot with abscess Terry 4 23 98 Re Soaking foot with abscess grace 12 6 98 Squared rear toes Julie 4 11 98 Re Squared rear toes sbuchner@interacs.com 6 13 98 Re Squared rear toes CC 4 20 98 Re Squared rear toes hunter mom 4 14 98 Re Squared rear toes Hansen 12 4 98 Club Foot Jerry S. 4 11 98 Re Club Foot dunne@ualberta.ca 10 10 98 Re Club Foot sbuchner@interacs.com 6 13 98 Re Club Foot Roz Moskovits 4 24 98 Re Club Foot moses 3 1 99 Hoof Flares brent 4 10 98 Re Hoof Flares sbuchner@interacs.com 6 13 98 Re Hoof Flares Angela 5 2 98 Re Hoof Flares 5 2 98 Re Hoof Flares AM 4 13 98 Re Hoof Flares 12 5 98 Last changed May 03 1999.
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    • E3 Information about Horses - http://www.nauticom.net/www/algae/horse/
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: E3 Information about Horses. Thoroughbred Race Horses Farriers and Hoof Care Warmblood Horses Warmblood Laminitis White Line Abscess Fungal Overall Health Race Horses VICAR WINNING GRADE 1 FLORIDA DERBY PUT YOUR. A HEAD IN FRONT Proven Safe Over 2 million pounds consumed 96 by humans. Our E 3 Earth s Essential Elements Aphanizomenon flos-aquae wild grown and natural is Certified Organic World Champion Athletes attributed Aphanizomenon flos-aquae for winning performances. IF WE SAID WE DISCOVERED THAT E 3 APHANIZOMENON FLOS-AQUAE Allows your horse to perform at its peak Supports the immune system making your horse less susceptible to stress related illnesses. and viruses Aids in repairing damage from Laminitis Fungal Abscess and Whiteline Disease Improves Hoof Quality Dapples out your horse Improves and Enhances your breeding program Marked Improvement of baby and mother during weaning Provides nutrition that no other food is capable of matching Is part of the daily feed program of many of the nations top Championship Horses WOULD YOU BELIEVE US DON'T JUST TAKE OUR WORD FOR IT Here is what a few of the experts will tell you about E 3. If someone were to ask me the most significant benefit to ourThoroughbred race horses that are eating E 3 is that E 3 enables them to perform at their class level peak. Angel Usategui World Champion Paso Fino Owner Breeder Florida I met Jean Brooks from the American. she published in the AWB Whisperer The AWS National Breeding Director Nikki Atwell purchased a TB mare. Author of Traits of a Winner trainer. for Kentucky Derby Winner Unbridled Trainer of Eclipse Award Winner Banshee. Nafzger Trainer of Eclipse Award Winner Banshee Breeze and. Vicar Winner of Fountain of Youth GR1 Florida Derby The nutritional components of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae can be seen on the MICRO-NUTRIENTS page. That's over 64 Micro-nutrients A few examples include Glycine Calms the nervous system. guarantees it quite like we do You Can't Loose OUR GUARANTEE IF YOU ARE NOT TOTALLY SATISFIED WITH OUR E 3 Aphanizomenon flos-aquae AT ANY TIME UP TO SIX MONTHS THE MONEY YOU SPENT ON E 3 WILL BE. NO QUESTIONS ASKED NO HARD FEELINGS NO SMALL PRINT Improve the quality of your life Improve the quality of your horses life two of your most prized possessions. for PENNIES a day 48 cents Farriers and Hoof Care Warmblood Horses Vet Couldn't Believe the Difference The AWS National Breeding Director Nikki. quoted from Jean Brooks Thoroughbred Race Horses Farriers and Hoof Care WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT. E3 Aphanizomenon Flos Aquae Laminitis Comparing E 3 to other supplements.you can see results. Brian Eastman CPA Horseshoeing NY Abscess Reuben Miller is a farrier with a long-standing reputation. Wayne Blevins Horseshoer Trainer CA Fungal The E 3 eating horses in my clientele do not develop. Angel Usategui Owner Breeder FL Overall Health Double L Zero is a 1976 AQHA stallion. Joe and Jenny Decker NY Feeding your animals the essential minerals and vitamins. Dean Bader DVM CA Thoroughbred Race Horses Warmblood Horses MAIN WHY E3 E3 BREAKDOWN NUTRITION CONTACT US ARTICLE BEAUTY SECRETS E-MAIL HORSES Y2K DIABETES ADHD ORDERING VIEW GUESTBOOK SIGN GUESTBOOK 1999 Vision Inc. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease.
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    • Michelle - http://www.redwrench.com/mischorse/michelles_horse_pages.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Michelle's Ponies Pages Last Updated 07 31 2000 Use F5 to refresh if you haven't been back in a while and this page looks the same. Our Horses Rhythm My Riding Horse on a Road Training Ride New Added 04 23 00 Luna My Endurance Prospect Bessie Filly At Large Vaengur My Hubby's Icelandic Horse Updated pictures of Vaengur Sandy Magic and Rhythm Magic the 2 year old Foxtrotter More Pictures of Our Horses Audrey her Arab and Rhythm I on a ride near home Jeff Audrey I riding at Cherry Creek New Added 06 11 00 Audrey I riding at Mancos New Added 07 02 00 Sig Creek New Added 07 30 00 Audrey I riding in the New Mexico Badlands New Added 07 02 00 Sandy and Magic on Winter Pasture Added 01 04 00 Sarena Rhythm and Magic on Summer Pasture Pedigrees Magi's Pedigree MFT Luna's Pedigree Arab Sarena's Pedigree Arab Rhythm's Pedigree MFT Sandee's Pedigree QH Vaengur's pedigree is not online as I can't type in Icelandic. For Sale the saddle pictures will stay up even when the saddles are gone 16 Saare Endurance Saddle C Tree 18 Stubben Columbo Dressage Saddle 1900's Antique Ladies Saddle By Isaac Cherry 1999 17 Ortho-Flex Patriot Officer's Model Saddle SOLD 1999 17.5 Ortho-Flex Caliente Saddle SOLD 199 17.5 Wintec Sport Trail Saddle SOLD Our Icelandic treeless saddle SOLD A Big Horn Saddle SOLD Hoof Info Rhythm's hooves Vaengur's hooves Sarena's hoof puncture and solar abscess Feed Info Details on what we feed rations Added 01 30 00 Supplements we feed including pictures of beet pulp Gear Info Suunto Advizor Heart Rate Monitor Our Saddles Tack Evaluating bit severity general Added 12 14 00 Evaluating my bits'severity Added 12 14 00 Sidepulls I use Our ReactorPanel saddle Our Used Sharon Saare saddle Our NEW Sharon Saare saddle Saare vs. Marciante Sarena's Australian saddle New Added 11 22 00 Miscellaneous Pony girth My camping list Our truck and trailer My saddle fit issue with an Ortho-Flex A Bob Marshall Sport Saddle Ringworm on our horse eeew Pictures of my first horses 20 some years ago Beverly and her Paso Finos Ocho and Red Riding in the Mancos Days Parade New Added 07 31 00 Recommended Horse Haulers compiled from RideCamp Miscellaneous stuff compiled from the CTR alias. Back to Michelle Jeff's Home Page Send me email michrowe@frontier.net This site is powered by Microsoft's IIS 5.0 Window 2000 and Front Page 2000.
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    • Footrot in sheep: 2. Diagnosis - http://www.nre.vic.gov.au/web/root/domino/infseries/infsheet.nsf/948cf8407d6ac5d...
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Diagnosis Notes Series No AG0446 David G Hinton Kyneton Current@May 1998 Click on icon to open Adobe Acrobat file AG0446.pdf. What to look for the signs of footrot Diagnosis Conditions similar to footrot Further information The coloured sheet Signs of Footrot should be attached to this Agnote. What to look for the signs of footrot The signs of infection vary from mild reddening inflammation of the interdigital skin skin between the digits or toes to complete separation of the horn of the hoof. Infection commences when bacteria lodge on the interdigital skin causing inflammation the skin-horn junction then begins to erode and the horn starts to lift. Sheep infected with footrot become progressively more lame and exhibit the following signs in progressive order 1. Under-running or separation of horn around heel sole toe and finally to the outside hoof wall. Factors affecting signs of footrot The rate of spread of footrot through a flock extent of under-running and speed of development of footrot signs in individual feet all depend on the four factors listed below. All must be considered in assessing any footrot outbreak Environment moisture and temperature in the pasture. New horn growth is often deformed by underlying infection and this provides a diagnostic sign. During dry periods the disease naturally regresses in a flock lameness will decrease accordingly but infection will survive in many feet. The succulent nature of footrot affected feet attracts flystrike. Consequently flystruck feet and associated body strike are a common feature of footrot outbreaks. Severe pain and lameness are always associated with flystruck feet and this causes animal welfare problems. Diagnosis An accurate diagnosis is essential as early outbreaks of footrot can be difficult to distinguish from other diseases. An early and precise diagnosis will assist in designing the best treatment program reducing costs and avoiding treatment failures. Animal Health Officers and veterinarians are able to confirm a diagnosis. They can also take samples which will enable a laboratory to confirm the presence and virulence of D. nodosus Scoring To describe footrot at its various stages a scoring system has been developed the Modified Egerton Scoring System. Score Description Appearance Dermatitis scald Gray in diagram Under-run horn. No lesion sign of disease 1 A limited mild interdigital dermatitis scald 2 More extensive interdigital dermatitis. 3 Severe interdigital dermatitis and under-running of the horn of the heel and sole 4 Severe interdigital dermatitis and under-running of the horn of the heel and sole but with the under-running extending to the walls of the hoof. Conditions similar to footrot Diseases and conditions that can appear similar to footrot are Foot abscess usually only one foot affected with swelling and pus. This condition is not uncommon creates an ideal environment for footrot bacteria to infect appears similar to the early stages of virulent footrot and is very similar to benign footrot. Benign Footrot Beating Footrot 39 pages including colour photos available from NRE offices. Spring Footrot Eradication 20 page guide to rapid cure method available from NRE Information Centre and NRE offices 6.95. This publication may be of assistance to you but the State of Victoria and its officers do not guarantee that the publication is without flaw of any kind or is wholly appropriate for your particular purposes and therefore disclaims all liability for any error loss or other consequence which may arise from you relying on any information in this publication.
      [Contents]
    • Abcess Problem - Between Rounds - http://www.chronofhorse.com/ubb/Forum5/HTML/000134.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Abcess Problem Between Rounds. Between Rounds Horse Care Abcess Problem profile register preferences faq search UBBFriend Email This Page to Someone next newest topic next oldest topic Author Topic Abcess Problem rescuemom Member Posts 290. Registered Jan 2000 posted 05-18-2000 03 16 PM Are there any hard and fast rules about how long it should take an abcess to blow My horse was shod 4 14 and the farrier accidentally quicked her. Is it unusual for an abcess to take this long to resolve Any suggestions re change of approach to the problem IP Logged Lionheart Member Posts 316. Hey devildog really enjoyed the Ethics and Morals i'll post on your thread to get it back up to the top. Registered Jan 2000 posted 05-22-2000 11 38 PM Thanks Calico I am glad you enjoyed the booklet IP Logged JB Member Posts 540. IP Logged All times are ET US next newest topic next oldest topic Administrative Options Close Topic Archive Move Delete Topic Hop to Select a Forum List of Forums Dressage Hunter-Jumper Eventing Sport Horse Breeding Hunting Horse Care Contact Us The Chronicle of the Horse Online Privacy Statement All editorial content Copyright 2000 by The Chronicle of the Horse. The opinions expressed are solely those of the authors and not those of the Chronicle of the Horse the Chronicle of the Horse takes no responsibility for such statements.
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    • Contracted heels - http://www.horse10.com/Applications/contractedheels.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Search Site In association with Equine Research Inc. Background information provided by Equine Research Inc. To Search the Web Contracted Heels Use of the Luwex rim pad flat will increase the movement in the heel area and allow the heels to expand preventing friction that can contribute to restriction of heel expansion. The Luwex flexible mesh full pad with AirRide hoof cushion can be used to provide frog pressure and encourage natural heel expansion. CONTRACTED HEELS What are contracted heels This is a condition where the foot is narrower than normal literally contracted especially at the heel. One such factor is trimming or shoeing in such a manner that eliminates pressure on the frog when the foot is on the ground. Sometimes a horse will keep the heel of his foot off the ground because of pain resulting from navicular disease sole or frog abscess sesamoid fracture or inflammation flexor tendon inflammation or suspensory apparatus damage or because of mechanical problems such as contracted deep digital flexor tendon and moderate to severe bucked knees. In a few cases genetics or a congenital malformation will result in a heel that is narrow and appears contracted. Other possibilities are lameness at fast speeds or a slight lameness that disappears with exercise. Chances are that if the contracted condition was induced by improper shoeing over a period of time the animal won t be lame. How are contracted heels treated Restoring normal frog pressure and restoring moisture to the hoof will are the only ways to treat primary contracted heels. If contraction is secondary to another problem as listed above the correction of that problem will automatically result in the resolution of the contraction. Veterinary assistance is recommended to correctly determine the primary cause and establish the best means of treatment. During this period corrective shoeing must be repeated as the hoof grows out until it is normally expanded. Naturally if the contracted condition is secondary its cure depends entirely upon the alleviation of the primary problem.
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    • The Horse Interactive -- Features, Nov. 1997: Thrush - http://www.thehorse.com/1197/thrush1197.html
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: The Horse Interactive Features Nov. ESSENTIAL HORSE HOME November 1997 Features Index Knowledge Bank Lamenesses See also The Art of Therapeutic Shoeing THE SCOOP KNOWLEDGE BANK THI HOME November 1997 Thrush By Christina S. Ball DVM Thrush is characterized by a thick black discharge Thrush is a very common word for those of us who have been spent any amount of time around horses. But does everyone know what thrush is How do you prevent it or how do you treat it once it has set up shop within your horse's hooves Thrush is a disease of the foot that usually occurs within the frog the wedge-shaped structure on the bottom surface of the foot and its sulci the grooves next to and in the middle of the frog The disease is characterized by a very soft frog and sulci. Usually thrush does not cause lameness if the disease stays in the superficial external and non-sensitive area of the frog. Thrush also can cause enough degeneration of the frog that portions of that structure have to be removed by your veterinarian or farrier. Thrush is most commonly associated with poor management practices or conditions. The full pad is good because it will protect their feet from rocks or help absorb shock in order to prevent lameness. As a result this long-term exposure to moisture and bacteria sets up the perfect environment for thrush to thrive. I am just warning that if your horse develops thrush after wearing full pads he she might need to have the shoes reset more frequently than the usually recommended six to eight weeks. This is an excellent practice not only for preventing thrush but also in checking for any foreign objects that might have found their way into your horse's foot such as nails or rocks. If you live in an area like I do-Central New York state-it is impossible during the months of March through June to have anything short of a mudslide in your paddocks. But daily foot cleaning will help offset the otherwise muddy conditions and will go a long way in helping prevent thrush. Some examples are Kopertox or Thrush Buster. Other medications can be used such as a dilute bleach solution tincture of iodine or a 10 formalin solution. These solutions can be applied topically to the frog to help resolve the infection watch your clothes most of these products will stain them forever Wearing gloves to protect your hands is a good idea. The thrush may be long gone but the foot remains quite sensitive from the chemical irritation of the treatment-use these products as directed and don't overtreat. If you don't think you are making headway with the infection within a few days contact your veterinarian. Thrush Or Canker There is another disease of the hoof which can be confused with thrush. This disease is called canker which is why you should have your veterinarian out to check your horse if you don't get resolution of the supposed thrush infection quickly. The difference between thrush and canker is that with canker the tissue in and around the frog is not destroyed but proliferates grows excessively The cause of this disease is unknown and although secondary infections of the hoof usually occur a purely bacterial origin has not been proven. These two diseases also are treated a bit differently so early distinction between the two is important. Canker usually is treated by removing the abnormal tissue either with the horse standing or sometimes under general anesthesia if extensive debridement of the hoof tissue needs to be performed. One of the most important aspects in treating this disease is keeping the hoof in a clean and dry environment. More On Thrush What if you examine the hoof and the entire frog is unhealthy or perhaps even loose For these cases your veterinarian and or farrier needs to get involved. If you are having trouble resolving the infection or if your horse is lame please consult your veterinarian. He or she can confirm whether or not your horse has thrush and recommend further treatment if necessary. The Scoop The Essential Horse Knowledge Bank Contact Us Subscribe Advertise 1997 The Horse.
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    • Large Animal Radiology - Quiz 3 - http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/larad/quiz/quizc.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Large Animal Radiology Quiz 3 Large Animal Radiology Quiz 3. You are called out to a nearby farm to look at an 8 year old 17.2 H Hanoverian mare that has been in training for show jumping and dressage during the past year. They have cut away some of the sole of the foot hoping to break open an abscess but found nothing. The following radiograph is the most remarkable one that you get The next day you return to Showplace with your radiograph. Copyright C 1995 University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.
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    • DairyBiz -- Animal Health -- Lameness and Hoof Health - http://www.dairybiz.com/archive/a_health_35.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: DairyBiz Animal Health Lameness and Hoof Health. AUGUST 1999 Lameness and Hoof Health Steven L. Berry DVM MPVM Department of Animal Science UCD Introduction. The 3 most common reasons for premature or involuntary culling of dairy cows are reproduction mastitis and lameness. The economic loss from lameness is due to premature culling lost milk production milk discard due to treatment with antibiotics treatment costs and reproductive inefficiencies. Research from New York calculated that the average case of lameness costs the producer about 300. This equates to a loss of 90 cow lactation if we have a lactational incidence of 30 as reported in New York 150 cow lactation if we a 50 incidence as reported in Florida or 180 cow lactation if the incidence is 60 as reported in UK and the Netherlands. The cost per case was found to be similar in various studies but the cost per herd is proportional to the lactational incidence. L ameness is a multifactorial disease and is directly related to how cows are managed. Some of the contributing factors are nutrition hygiene cow comfort freestall management walking surfaces time spent standing on concrete hoof health and claw trimming. Prevention is more economical that treatment but close observation and prompt treatment of lame cows will decrease the duration and thus the cost of each case. A preliminary study from Sweden reported that cows had 30 more sole ulcers and 25 more severe sole hemorrhages when trimmed once instead of twice yearly. Many producers in the US do not trim cows on a regular basis because of the perceived cost of trimming. Functional hoof trimming is designed to balance the effects of wear and growth and will be explained more fully later in the paper. These are the direct result of insult or injury to the corium and are lesions we generally attribute to laminitis Similar incidence figures have been reported from Florida but the summer incidence was higher than winter. Keep in mind that we have taken an animal whose natural environment is pasture varied surface often yielding and put her on concrete for much of her life. By understanding the normal anatomy and function of the cow's foot we can keep the foot functional and prevent many of the lameness problems. This and other pictures in this handout are from Cattle Footcare and Claw Trimming by E. Lameness is a multifactorial disease and is directly related to how cows are managed. Some of the contributing factors are nutrition hygiene cow comfort freestall management walking surfaces time spent standing on concrete hoof health and claw trimming. Each digit of the foot then is comprised of four bones the long pastern bone proximal phalanx P1 the short pastern bone middle phalanx P2 the pedal bone distal phalanx P3 and the navicular bone. The proximal and middle phalanges are outside of the claw and the distal phalanx and navicular bones are inside the claw. The digital cushion lies below the pedal bone and has 2 functions 1 to cushion the corium from the pedal bone and 2 to pump blood back up the leg when the cow walks. The two claws are divided by the interdigital space and connected by smooth hairless skin. The interdigital space is narrow especially between the heels which can trap manure and lead to interdigital dermatitis. Healthy corium equals healthy horn and diseased corium equals diseased horn. The coronary corium produces the wall of the hoof which grows downward from the coronary band at about 5 mm 1 4 inch per month. The laminar corium produces the laminar horn that attaches the abaxial dorsal and a small part of the axial wall to the pedal bone see Figure 3 Therefore the pedal bone is firmly attached and suspended inside the toe of the normal hoof. Cattle on pasture will walk on varying surfaces some hard and some yielding. The sole and wall tend to wear flat due to the abrasive and shearing forces from walking on concrete. Overgrowth will generally result in a hoof that is too long and the toe the toe angle is too shallow The goals of functional trimming are to distribute the weight evenly between the 2 claws of the foot to leave sufficient horn to protect the corium and to trim the claws to their normal shape and proportion. Most producers on a regular hoof trimming program trim cows at dry off. Most cows could also use a mid-lactation trimming or at least an evaluation to determine if trimming is necessary. Toussaint Raven from the Netherlands developed the method of functional trimming described below. On many Midwestern dairies the cows do not have to walk very far and hoof trimmers may rest the lateral heel by trimming it about 1 8th of an inch lower than the medial heel. On most of our western dairies the cows walk greater distances and have more wear on the heels. Allowing the lateral claw to rest will facilitate healing. R emember the correctly trimmed normal foot should have a flat weight-bearing surface wall and sole and should be flat across the toes and heels and flat front to back. Laminitis can be peracute hours acute day to days or chronic weeks to months The most common condition is chronic subclinical laminitis. The most common hypothesis regarding the pathogenesis of laminitis is that endotoxins are produced in the gastrointestinal tract during subclinical or clinical rumen acidosis. These endotoxins are absorbed into the circulatory system and cause thrombi or small blood clots that can affect the peripheral circulation especially in the feet. he following are the most common hoof abnormalities that lead to lameness Sole and white line hemorrhages originate from damage to corium with the blood being incorporated into the horn as it grows. These will become visible several weeks after the insult depending on the thickness of the sole and rate of growth. A sole abscess or white line abscess can occur if the hemorrhage becomes infected. Sole separation results when the corium is damaged transiently produces weak or damaged horn and then normal horn production resumes. White line disease starts with fissures due to hemorrhage and poor quality horn formation. Papillomatous digital dermatitis footwarts heel warts digital dermatitis etc is a superficial dermatitis that occurs most often on the rear feet at the commissure of the interdigital space near the heels. Interdigital phlegmon foul in the foot footrot is a bacterial disease that is generally caused by a synergism between two bacteria.
      [Contents]
    • Laminitis Simplified - Hyperion Farm, Inc. - http://www.hyperionfarm.com/laminitis_simplified.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Laminitis Simplified Hyperion Farm Inc. Simplified Home Up Feedback Search Guest Book Company Profile LAMINITIS SIMPLIFIED Submitted to Hyperion Farm Laminitis Page by Sandy Loree December 7 1999 Laminitis has the reputation of being a devastating complicated disease. Over the years many people have dedicated immense time and effort studying laminitis striving to find a cure. We are all aware of the symptoms of laminitis the pain the typical laminitis stance sunken hairline wavy growth rings increased pulse rotated coffin bone dropped sole and extended whiteline. There seems to be several conditions laminitis is associated with toxins stress flu carbohydrate overload fresh green grass obesity and infections. Until now an effective and dependable treatment method has not been found I have been managing founder cases by controlling the load share between the hoof wall and the sole since 1994. I am excited that the results of doing so have been excellent consistent repeatable and dependable. Please access my website at www.horseshoes.com 5sequine for detailed photos and description of some typical cases. The only limiting factors to the end result is the original genetic makeup of the hoof and permanent tissue damage as a result of the foundering process. For the reader to appreciate my interpretation of laminitis and founder more information is needed about the weight bearing systems within the hoof about the principal of load share between the hoof wall and the sole about the principle of tissue overload and about how to unload the hoof wall. Position of the bones locomotion and suspension are dictated and controlled by the ligaments and tendons. The weight bearing load is transferred down the leg from one bone to another through the articulating joints. The volar surface is protected by the sole callous while the dorsal surface is protected by the hoof wall. The principle of controlling the load share between the hoof wall and the sole refers to controlling the load share between these two weight bearing systems. From my experiences as a farrier and horseman I have learned that the sole of the hoof can be tender and easily bruised. Based on over sixty cases I have applied sole support it has been proven to me that the sole is capable of carrying most or all the load from a given foot for an extended period of time. When put to use the sole is stimulated to thicken and toughen and its load carrying capacity increases. TISSUE OVERLOAD When any given body tissue is asked or forced to endure a functional load greater than it is capable of supporting that tissue will fail in the form of an injury. Second the animal itself could be suffering a systemic condition that causes the various body tissues to be temporarily sick An individual tissue thus may be too weak to carry a normal load. Factors that contribute to this scenario are improper hoof care management inadequate nutrition extreme environmental conditions lack of exercise to stimulate circulation or an inferior circulatory system due to genetics or previous injury. Regardless of the combination of scenarios for any given case it can be said that the tissue is in an overload situation. If a tissue is being injured by an overload situation the load must be removed to initiate the healing process. Historically laminitis occurs when the horse experiences a rather large serious systemic stress. The sick laminae is stretched and torn with no physical limitation to how far the hoof wall can be separated from P3. Another reason is because the laminae happens to be located at the end of the leg. Circulation to the extremities of the limbs is a challenge at the best of times and that problem is magnified when the body s chemistry is out of balance. Also when the horse is generally feeling poorly it will tend to stand in one place thus the circulation to the lower leg is further reduced due to the lack of stimulation from movement. These cumulative reasons cause the laminae to be quickly placed in a severe overload situation with no natural way to be unloaded. WHAT IS FOUNDER Founder is what happens to the hoof if the laminae overload is not reversed quickly. The unnatural displacement of the hoof wall causes mechanical restriction of the blood circulation to key areas within the hoof. This serum usually cannot escape through the hoof wall or the sole callous and thus collects in pockets under the wall or the sole. These seroma pockets can abscess and fester for several weeks before breaking out somewhere usually at the coronary band. The characteristic buzzing pulse may be present before hoof wall displacement or after but it is associated with severe inflammation and trauma. If the injury causing load is not removed the laminae and various other tissues of the hoof continue to be injured. CHAIN OF EVENTS OF LAMINITIS FOUNDER 1. Within a few hours of on-slaught of the systemic stress the weight bearing load forces the wall from P3 tearing the laminae. Inflammation and seroma pockets are serious factors. Without some form of reversal of the overload situation the condition will remain chronic. PREVENT FOUNDER To prevent the hoof from foundering remove the load from the hoof wall and the laminae when the horse is experiencing a systemic condition that historically leads to laminitis. The horse s health and environment must be carefully managed to enhance the rejuvenation process. When favorable ground conditions are not available or when the sole callous is insufficient the foot can be fitted with a commercial sole support system to cushion and artificially extend the sole to or beyond the rim of the hoof wall. For those who are leery of using sole support it should be noted here that when the hoof founders with no intervention the wall is displaced until the sole comes in sufficient contact with the ground to take a portion of the load from the wall. This results in bruises and holes in the sole eventual deformities to the tip of P3 and possible damage to the circumflex artery. If the load ends up being born through the sole anyway then it makes sense to manage the load on the sole to avoid these typical symptoms of sole overload. Care must be taken to distribute and cushion the load over the entire area of the sole cavity taking advantage of as much surface area as possible and avoid pressure points. Please refer to my website www.horseshoes.com 5sequine to learn about products and techniques of applying sole support to successfully unload the hoof wall and manage laminitis. RECIPE FOR TREATMENT OF LAMINITIS Here is my recipe for treating laminitis. When the horse is suffering a systemic condition that could lead to laminitis or if the horse is exhibiting symptoms of laminitis action must be taken immediately. Initiate farrier care to unload the wall NOW This will minimize damage and suffering on acute cases. Initiate veterinary care to treat the systemic problem that triggered the laminitis. Pro-active mechanical drainage via grooves cut through the hoof wall and poultice application are effective to minimize the pressure. During these traumatic times it is important to keep priorities in perspective. That load must be minimized throughout the healing process or the laminae will continue to be injured and the situation cannot be resolved. When the horse is suffering periods of pain relative to inflammation and serum pockets do not give in to the temptation to abort unloading of the wall in favor of treating the more immediate symptom. It may however become necessary to temporarily remove the sole support system to initiate drainage. Areas of extreme tenderness or exposed sole corium can develop anywhere but will usually be at the toe area or around the apex of the frog. Administer anti-inflammatory agents Rasp horizontal grooves in the hoof wall at the toe Apply a poultice over the grooves Monitor the situation closely Make adjustments as required 4. Deep soft bedding such as sand or saw dust to encourage laying down Nutrition shelter social company Free roaming exercise is important but avoid overdoing it Lay the horse off work 5. Use a moderate level of sole support when possible Use a quality support system to cushion and distribute the load Keep the horse s body weight down Provide soft dry ground conditions Monitor the situation and make adjustments as necessary Refer to www.horseshoes.com 5sequine for techniques to manage sole overload 6. Maintain a reduced load on the wall until the new wall and laminae are grown 8 to 12 months Reset the sole support system at 4 to 5 week intervals WHAT TO EXPECT DURING THE TREATMENT PROCESS For pre-founder cases while the horse is suffering a systemic condition that is known to trigger laminitis if the hoof walls are unloaded early before the lameness symptoms appear the feet will not founder and the horse will remain sound. The application of quality sole support to cushion and distribute the sole load provides pain relief from pressure points on the sole area. Unloading the wall relieves the strain on the injured laminae. For acute cases with the horse displaying lameness symptoms and or when the hoof wall has been displaced from the coffin bone immediately upon unloading the wall the horse will experience considerable relief of pain associated with the strained or traumatized laminae. First Two To Ten Weeks Of Treatment The horse s soundness will gradually improve as the injured laminae heals and the associated inflammation subsides. However it is to be expected that the horse will experience periods of severe pain until the inflammation is in control. There is a risk during this period that the horse begins to feel so good it may over exercise causing injury to the newly rejuvenated laminae and inflammation of the sole. The new hoof wall is smooth without the typical wavy growth rings associated with laminitis. SUMMARY Laminitis is simply a condition of tissue overload. Laminitis is simple to manage if it is treated as an overload condition and the weight bearing load on the laminae is removed early. By unloading the wall and laminae most complications associated with laminitis are minimized or non-existent. Once the wall is unloaded the new wall generating from the coronary band becomes attached with healthy laminae as the wall growth progresses toward the ground. The subject of this presentation is Laminitis but it is important to note that other ailments involving the hoof wall or laminae can be effectively managed by unloading the hoof wall. Hoof wall cracks flares dished profile extended whiteline and crushed heels are all symptoms of tissue overload. He has made presentations to the Guild of Professional Farriers and to the 1999 Bluegrass Laminitis Symposium. His website is found within the Farrier and Hoofcare Resource Center www.horseshoes.com For further information on 5S Products and the benefits and techniques of controlling the load share between the hoof wall and the sole access the 5S website at www.horseshoes.com 5sequine Readers with questions and comments are welcome to post them on the 5S Equine Bulletin Board which is found in the Products and Services Bulletin Board section in the Farrier and Hoofcare Resource Center. Notice To our knowledge all graphics used at this site are public domain or used with the author's permission. If you spot any artwork that is not properly credited please contact webmaster@hyperionfarm.com See our Privacy Statement and our Disclaimer Copyright 1999-2000 Hyperion Farm Inc.
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    • Sunday Times - sport - 22 November 1998 - http://www.suntimes.co.za/1998/11/22/sport/sport27.htm
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: sport Home Business Times readRight Big Break Cybercards Imbizo Forum Search Archive FAQ Site Map National Gauteng Cape KwaZulu-Natal Contents National Soccer Rugby Cricket Contents National Gauteng Cape KwaZulu-Natal Contents 22 November 1998. Sport De Kock's string on track DAVID MOLLETT. WHAT a difference a year makes. Just 12 months ago the bottom fell out of trainer Mike de Kock's world his stable at a standstill because of a virus and his dream of winning his first championship in tatters. De Kock is probably not everybody's cup of tea because he seeks neither favours nor patronage but simply fairness. This month De Kock has won the November Handicap with Smart Money and the Allen Snijman Stakes with Star Defence. Today weather permitting he has a big chance of winning the Dingaans at Turffontein with either Horse Chestnut or Within Reason. Then it is the big one the J B Met at Kenilworth on the first Saturday of February-and De Kock admitted he could have a very nice hand I'll be entering Horse Chestnut Star Defence Smart Money and Golden Hoard he said. Golden Hoard who has overcome the hoof abscess which resulted in his missing next month's Hong Kong Vase is still in the Cape in the care of trainer Joey Ramsden.
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    • http://lam.vet.uga.edu/LAM/LM000061.HTML
      • Abstract:
        Document Excerpt: Disclaimer These notes are just that they are not intended as a substitute for textbooks. They are intended for use in conjunction with lectures given in the veterinary curriculum at the University of Georgia. However the author cannot be responsible if this information is misunderstood or misconstrued because it has been taken out of context of the lectures the notes were designed to accompany. GENERAL Significance Incidence Etiology of Foot Lameness in Dairy Cattle Anatomy Hoof growth Conformation Trimming Examination for lameness Local anesthesia Nerve blocks 1. Midmetatarsus Intravenous Regional Anesthesia Principles of Treatment Blocks Wiring claws together Amputation Arthrodesis Amputation vs Arthrodesis Tendon sheath resection B. E.G FOOT AND MOUTH Prevention of Digital Lameness C. ODDS AND SODS CARPAL HYGROMA CONTRACTED TENDONS MUSCLE TENDON RUPTURES PERIPHERAL NERVE PARALYSES DOWNER COW SYNDROME TETANUS OVINE FOOT ROT A. Etiology of Foot Lameness in Dairy Cattle Nutrition. Experience knowledge of farmer Anatomy Topographical anatomy of the abaxial surface of a bovine hoof. Notice the asymmetry the lateral claw has a greater weightbearing surface area. Posture normally the hindlimbs should be parallel but with damage to the lateral claw leading to base wide toe out conformation the medial claw bares more weight. b Dorsal and palmar plantar proper abaxial digital nerves III IV. Midmetatarsus a Medial and lateral plantar nerves. Method expose joint ventrally to drain curette cartilage wire claws block. Postop antibiotics bandage rest Amputation vs Arthrodesis Economics. stem from abnormal production of soft horn abnormal shape altered weight bearing. Analgesics Aspirin no withdrawl Phenylbutazone long withdrawl Corticosteroids controversial at best contraindicated in horses Antihistamines. If ascends to coronary band try to avoid removing full length of wall in dorsal 2 3 of foot decreases stability 5. Etiology Predisposing factors-trauma to coronary band dry enviroment laminitis. Single vs multiple latter associated with systemic disease Clinical signs proportional to depth. Remove toe by trimming to decrease motion to decrease pain. Heel Erosions Chronic Necrotic Pododermatitis Etiologic agent Bacteroides nodosus Fusobacteriun necrophorum Heel erosions. Probably an extension of interdigital dermatitis. Eventual result abnormal shape of foot altered weight bearing. Possible role in pathogenesis of solear ulceration complex. Pathogenesis theory only Abnormal angulation of P2 P3 so that articular surfaces are not parallel. By definition the lateral wall growth curves under the sole weightbearing on abaxial surface of wall. Interdigital Necrobacillosis Foot Rot Etiology Fusobacterium necrophorum Schematic illustrating the typical location of interdigital dermatitis foot rot Pathogenesis. Interdigital Dermatitis Definition Inflammation of interdigital skin without extension to the subcutaneous tissues. Bacteroides nodosus Fusobacterium necrophorum Exudation of PMNs etc inflamed when dermis involved. Interdigital Hyperplasia Corns Hyperplasia of the interdigital epidermis hypodermis and hyperkeratosis. Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis Dermatitis Verrucosa Etiology probably spirochaete possibly Bacteroides Nodosus Epidemiology incidence 3-80 of herd affected appears contageous. Common location for papillomatous digital dermatitis verrucose dermatitis heel warts Clinical Symptoms. Swelling dorsal suggests DIP joint palmar suggests retroarticular abscess heel abscess infected tendon sheath. Astringents Formalin 5 CuSO4 10 Twice week C. Lateral luxation of the patella congenital 4. Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture Predisposition high weight sudden twists. Neurological signs when fracture of exostoses fused vertebrae apply pressure to cord. Humerus Midshaft young animals rest alone internal fixation 5. Prognosis supposedly worse at origin or insertion White Muscle Disease in calves.
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